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Forum topic by Eric S. posted 10-17-2016 05:27 PM 534 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eric S.

15 posts in 81 days


10-17-2016 05:27 PM

So I’m planning on upgrading my tools slowly (I have a cheapo 8pc set that I started with), and I think I’ve decided to go with Thompson tools. So my question is, what order would you upgrade in? I’m probably going to order one or two in the next couple of days, and I’m thinking maybe a skew and spindle gouge.

Thoughts?

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.


20 replies so far

View gargey's profile

gargey

457 posts in 236 days


#1 posted 10-17-2016 05:47 PM

Here’s the order I’d buy tools in if I was a turner:

1) Nail gun
2) Auriou 6” modelers rasp
3) Jackhammer
4) Hotley low angle block plane with rosewood handles
5) Hammer
6) Sandwich
7) Lie-Nielsen side rabbet plane pair

That’s a pretty good starter kit to get you going building furniture. The basics.

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Eric S.

15 posts in 81 days


#2 posted 10-17-2016 05:51 PM

I’m not sure what sort of lathe you have, but please upload a YouTube video of you turning a bowl with a jackhammer.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

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gargey

457 posts in 236 days


#3 posted 10-17-2016 06:01 PM

You don’t turn a bowl with a jackhammer. You use a jackhammer to turn a circular spindle into square stock by attaching a blade to the bit, and timing the impulses to be 4x the angular velocity of the spindle. Duh.

You guys never need a 2×2 board when all you have is 3” spindles???

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Eric S.

15 posts in 81 days


#4 posted 10-17-2016 06:04 PM

Ah, so if I have a 4×4, I turn it down to a 3” spindle, then use the jackhammer to get it down to a 2×2… Got it.

I’ll keep this in mind the next time I’m out in the woods with nothing but a lathe, a jackhammer, and the wrong size piece of wood! (Although I frequently bring my table saw camping…)

Lol

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1738 posts in 599 days


#5 posted 10-17-2016 06:28 PM

I don’t know what you turn mostly but for me, I use spindle gouges and a diamond parting tool the most so those are the ones I’d upgrade first. I know skews would be first on a lot of people’s lists but I rarely use them so they wouldn’t be a priority for me.

Once I got the gouges and parting tool, I’d skip the jackhammer and go straight to the sandwich. I’m hungry…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Eric S.

15 posts in 81 days


#6 posted 10-17-2016 07:09 PM

The parting tool I have sucks, but it’s easy to sharpen and if it gets a bit dull, it burns part of the project that I’m getting rid of anyway, so it’s not high on my list. Eventually I’ll replace it, but I want bang for my buck right now. It seems like spindle gouge is the way to go, and since I do like my skews, maybe my original plan isn’t so bad.

Does the sandwich come with a beer? I’m thirsty.

Thanks!

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View Leo Van Der Loo's profile

Leo Van Der Loo

28 posts in 219 days


#7 posted 10-17-2016 07:53 PM



So I m planning on upgrading my tools slowly (I have a cheapo 8pc set that I started with), and I think I ve decided to go with Thompson tools. So my question is, what order would you upgrade in? I m probably going to order one or two in the next couple of days, and I m thinking maybe a skew and spindle gouge.

Thoughts?

- Eric S.

I would replace the tools I use the most, rather than some you hardly ever or never use.

-- Have fun and take care

View gargey's profile

gargey

457 posts in 236 days


#8 posted 10-17-2016 08:30 PM



Ah, so if I have a 4×4, I turn it down to a 3” spindle, then use the jackhammer to get it down to a 2×2… Got it.

I ll keep this in mind the next time I m out in the woods with nothing but a lathe, a jackhammer, and the wrong size piece of wood! (Although I frequently bring my table saw camping…)

Lol

- Eric S.

Exactly. You’re coming along nicely – learn a little bit every day.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#9 posted 10-17-2016 10:13 PM

Skews are easy to sharpen so they would be lower on my list.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View jeff's profile

jeff

988 posts in 2926 days


#10 posted 10-18-2016 09:41 AM

Yes which tools do you use the most?.And what type of turning do you do?.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 329 days


#11 posted 10-18-2016 12:16 PM

What do you have in your 8-piece set? I started with a 16-piece set, but it didn’t include a bedan, so that was my first “add-on” (but I built one rather than buying one). Next I got a couple of extra skews so I could experiment with different grinds because I find the skew to be probably the most versatie out of all the tools I’ve used, and there are so many different ways you can grind them—different bevel angles, skew angles, edge profiles, flank profiles—endless possibilities. Next I’ll probably be making a larger bedan, because I’m finding it a close second when it comes to versatility, but harder to master.

But that’s just me. I’m not recommending either skews or bedans, but I do recommend you think about what kind of tool you can do the most with and presents the most possibilities for customization to fit your creative needs.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 762 days


#12 posted 10-18-2016 01:03 PM

Since we don’t know what you have now…
I like a wider skew for most things; 1” is my go-to, after than my 1.5” for rough work. I only use my 1/2” for really small work. I have tried different grinds and like the straight blade much more than the curved; and it is easier to hone.
You may want to talk to Doug and see what he suggest for what you are turning. I only have one of his tools and it is the 3/8 detail spindle gouge which I really like. When I use up my Sorbys I will probably replace them with more of Dougs.
I’m not sure why you are burning the wood with your parting tool? Is it on the tip area or is it rubbing and burning on the sides? Like the skew, I only hone my parting tool as it is quicker than going to the grinder.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1882 posts in 1595 days


#13 posted 10-18-2016 02:01 PM

Buying what you use most is great advice!

We don’t know what size lathe you have or type turning you like to do! If you are a pen turner all you need is a roughing gouge, parting tool, and skew. If making bottle stoppers or pepper mills a 3/8” and 1/2” spindle gouge cannot be beat. If turning long spindles 3/4” or 1” skew is essential.

At one time thought Doug said he doesn’t sharpen or put a bevel on his scrapers & skews. I know still has a statement about all tools come already sharpened and I could be wrong.

JMHO, don’t need an exotic steel skew both carbon & HSS work just fine. Several years back bought new HT KRYO 1/2” steel skew. Did not see where it held and edge better than HSS. I am about to replace that skew and my P & N 3/4” HSS skew. I am looking at Ashley Iles, Crown, & Sorby HSS skews. I use my skews a lot especially 1/2”. Also going to replace my 3/8” & 1/2” spindle gouges and will be buying those from Doug Thompson.

Recommend requesting some free catalogs from Craft’s Supplies & Packard Wood works. If buy more than one turning tool from those folks get a discount. Catalogs usually have more information than web sites like usable tool length.

https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/

-- Bill

View Eric S.'s profile

Eric S.

15 posts in 81 days


#14 posted 10-18-2016 04:12 PM

Thanks for all the info guys!

For more info on me. I’m turning on a Rockler Excelsior.

This is the set of tools I have now:
https://www.amazon.com/SAVANNAH-WOOD-LATHE-CHISEL-8-PIECE/dp/B004MM3MES

As far as what I’m turning, I’m turning anything I can think of turning. I’m new to this, and so I’ve been doing bowls, boxes, ornaments, honey dippers, wine toppers, etc… So I’m looking for the best tools for flexibility.

-- Why waste the money buying it, when I can spend twice as much on new tools, a week online researching new techniques, and a month building it.

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 762 days


#15 posted 10-18-2016 05:33 PM

I’m not familiar with the Savannah brand but they look like they should be a good starting set.
Your parting tool is flat (like mine) so you have to be sure to make a relief cut; that may be why you are getting some burning.

I will stay with my original of the 3/8 detail spindle gouge because of what you say you are turing (Ornaments, honey dippers, toppers) which may all have a lot of detail. Usually the detail spindle gouge is ground much more “pointy” to get into tight areas.

If you are not honing your flat blades I would give it a try. None of mine have been to the grinder in at least a year. A decent width hone makes life much easier. Based on their product line this is probably a pretty good set.
http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=145107&Category_Code=sharp-dmt-mshrp
JMHO but your skews should work well if razor sharp.

I might would go with an additional bowl gouge in order to have different grinds available.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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