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Forum topic by supermaltese posted 10-17-2016 11:05 AM 351 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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supermaltese

2 posts in 55 days


10-17-2016 11:05 AM

I am attempting to install a basic ramp in my living room tomorrow. It will be about 72” long with an 8” rise. I haven’t measured the angle yet. Supposing it’s 10 degrees, how do I cut the angle on my plywood using only a circular saw?


7 replies so far

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Mikesawdust

276 posts in 2505 days


#1 posted 10-17-2016 11:26 AM

seams easy enough to measure in 7 3/4 inches on one end, strike a line from the corner to there; this will give you eight inches of rise assuming you are using 3/4 inch. Next repeat from the opposite end and you should end with a rectangle 40” x 72” with two wedged pieces to set the angle. Simply add supports underneath.

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#2 posted 10-17-2016 12:56 PM

If you are talking just beveling the edge.

You can block the ply or a board 6 feet long on an 8 inch block/cinderblock.

My circular saw has a bevel adjustment – - set the bevel so that the blade is vertical… when the sole is sitting on the angle

To cut the ply – clamp a straight edge and you can cut the bevel

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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smitdog

229 posts in 1572 days


#3 posted 10-17-2016 01:44 PM

You mean cutting the sharp angle at the end that meets up with the lower floor, like this pic?

The dotted red would be the cut you are talking about?
If so, it’s a bit of a pain but I would attach a thicker piece of wood, like a 2×6, to the edge of the cut to give your saw plate something to sit on then set your blade to 80 degrees (or 90 degrees minus whatever angle you figure it to be). Your blade won’t go all the way through but it makes for a nice guide for a handsaw to finish the cut. Just make sure your screws to hold the 2×6 on are down below where your saw blade will reach! :) Here’s another pic to help illustrate:

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

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Snipes

99 posts in 1711 days


#4 posted 10-17-2016 02:22 PM

Nice job smit!

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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supermaltese

2 posts in 55 days


#5 posted 10-17-2016 07:28 PM

@smitdog Thank you very much. In my head I had imagined something similar, but I couldn’t figure out how to do it. I can’t really stand it upright, but the 2×6 attached, and it lying down will not be too difficult. This will work just fine. Thank you.


You mean cutting the sharp angle at the end that meets up with the lower floor, like this pic?

The dotted red would be the cut you are talking about?
If so, it s a bit of a pain but I would attach a thicker piece of wood, like a 2×6, to the edge of the cut to give your saw plate something to sit on then set your blade to 80 degrees (or 90 degrees minus whatever angle you figure it to be). Your blade won t go all the way through but it makes for a nice guide for a handsaw to finish the cut. Just make sure your screws to hold the 2×6 on are down below where your saw blade will reach! :) Here s another pic to help illustrate:

- smitdog


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smitdog

229 posts in 1572 days


#6 posted 10-17-2016 09:58 PM

Happy to help! And don’t worry about getting it too perfect, the tip will flex quite a bit so you can screw it down and force it into place easy enough!

-- Jarrett - Mount Vernon, Ohio

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3209 days


#7 posted 10-18-2016 03:05 PM

Can also for that floor meeting face, use a belt sander.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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