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Forum topic by Whofan posted 10-14-2016 01:00 PM 404 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Whofan

8 posts in 1051 days


10-14-2016 01:00 PM

Good morning, We recently moved to a home where my shop is now in an un heated area. I have heaters for when I am in the shop but it will be subjected to bitter temps as we are in western NY. I’m On top of the paints and stains but I am concerned that I need to take steps perhaps with my equip. , batteries, yada yada. I would appreciate any feedback in this regard. Thanks, Kirk

-- Kirk, Upstate NY


12 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#1 posted 10-14-2016 01:29 PM

Heat kills batteries, not cold so no worry there. Other than your comfort there’s no reason for concern.

View Goat0311's profile

Goat0311

13 posts in 203 days


#2 posted 10-14-2016 01:42 PM

I am in the same boat as you, I live in Central NY. My shop is in a detached garage, I have been slowly insulating it throughout the summer and am currently bouncing back and forth between my options to heat it and trying to make it so everything will stay warm and dry. If you were to leave it in the garage with our weather elements I foresee problems with batteries draining quickly and recharging constantly, lubrication on equipment in cold temps freezing causes more friction and potential damage, and the biggest problem all the stored wood. As you might know in upstate NY one day its 20 degrees and the next day its 60 degrees, storing wood in a non controlled environment like that will become an issue.

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Goat0311

13 posts in 203 days


#3 posted 10-14-2016 01:46 PM



Heat kills batteries, not cold so no worry there. Other than your comfort there s no reason for concern.

- dhazelton

Im sorry but your wrong. Cold kills batteries as well, thats why it can be harder to start your car in cold weather, your phone battery drains very quick when you don’t keep it warm, and your power tool batteries will be dead if you leave them long enough in a shop that isn’t heated.

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

326 posts in 995 days


#4 posted 10-14-2016 02:11 PM

You will also need to do some rust prevention on tools, iron and steel tools will need a coating of oil or wax to prevent the condensation from heating and cooling cycles from ruining your surfaces. I have never used it, but Boeshield is often recommended as a rust preventative. I have had good luck with Paste wax, it is cheap, easy to apply and does not leave residue on your stock. It also reduces friction when using tools.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1956 days


#5 posted 10-14-2016 02:35 PM

You’ll want to get the waterborne finishes to an area where they won’t freeze. That may be as simple as building an insulated box and put a light bulb in it. Glue as well, although glue can go through a few freeze/thaw cycles (according the Titebond) without being ruined….but it’s not recommended. Solvent based stuff is fine in the cold.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Whofan

8 posts in 1051 days


#6 posted 10-14-2016 02:39 PM

Thanks folks, Any issues with firing up a table saw that’s been sitting at 10 degrees , Id hate like hell to seize up something. Guess I’ve been spoiled. Oh yeah, Nail guns. Just wondering Kirk

-- Kirk, Upstate NY

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1956 days


#7 posted 10-14-2016 03:18 PM

You won’t seize anything up…at least not on the saw; personal extremities may be a different story. On the saw, if the belt has a set it may take a little longer for it to smooth out. No idea about nail guns, never tried them in cold conditions.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Goat0311

13 posts in 203 days


#8 posted 10-14-2016 03:26 PM

What kind of space are you dealing with? Just curious cause why don’t you consider some options for heating it? I know a lot plays into that decision whether or not your gonna live there for a long time, cost and so on.

View Whofan's profile

Whofan

8 posts in 1051 days


#9 posted 10-14-2016 03:46 PM

at this point I can’t justify the fulltime heating option. I’ll tell you the one thing I love is having the shop on the main floor. I had never really thought about it. Or maybe as I’m getting older those basement stairs were getting longer and steeper. You know I don’t need to keep it 68, even 48 would be better. Hmmm, never know. Thanks for the feedback. I was trying to explain this site to my daughter, she just doesn’t seem to get it, my wife does though.

-- Kirk, Upstate NY

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

756 posts in 1458 days


#10 posted 10-14-2016 07:52 PM

I just turn on a space heater an hour or so before I go out. It’s cold, but that takes the edge off. The only tool I have an issue with us my planer. When cold, the rollers are slick and don’t grab the wood to move it through. I have to make sure to run the heater on it a bit first.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#11 posted 10-14-2016 10:46 PM

“Cold kills batteries as well, thats why it can be harder to start your car in cold weather.”

Yes, some cold cranking amps are lost in cold weather but you’re also trying to start an engine with sludge for oil and with all the metal contracted. Come spring or a warm day your battery is perfectly fine again. Yes – you can run down a battery when it’s sub freezing out if your car is not in a good state of tune but I meant kill like permanently ruin. Excess heat will ruin a battery.

I used to work with a lot of photographers and they kept batteries in the refrigerator.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3675 posts in 1729 days


#12 posted 10-15-2016 12:58 AM

I pretty much do like Brian. But where I live when it gets down to around 15 below or more you really can’t warm that garage enough to work comfortably. That concrete garage floor sucks the heat like nothing else. I’ve got my garage fully insulated and it’s great till those really fierce temps hit. Here in another month or so I’ll pack and store all my liquids; stains, varnishes, glue and whatever to keep things from freezing including my battery operated drills. It’s a PITA to have to make frequent trips back to the Man Cave for something I forgot. But it’s what you got to do.

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