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Forum topic by UncleStumpy posted 10-13-2016 07:18 AM 311 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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UncleStumpy

707 posts in 1775 days


10-13-2016 07:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip trick gluing metal

I have a customer that wants a thin metal veneer put over the face of a picture frame.

Without going into boring details, I want to know if any of you guys know what kind of glue to use?

I have come to a semi conclusion that maybe a metal gluing 2 part epoxy would work. Like the single unit 2 tube style you get at Home Depot etc.

Will this work or does anyone have a different approach or a trick?

Thank you in advance!!!!! Ray

-- "They don't want it perfect - they want it SPECIAL"


11 replies so far

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1667 days


#1 posted 10-13-2016 11:25 AM

The glue I use is called gilding size I use it for attaching Gold copper and silver to wood.

There are other products avaliable, Mattese is one

and another

-- Regards Robert

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Jim Jakosh

17154 posts in 2568 days


#2 posted 10-13-2016 11:54 AM

I would use contact cement!

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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dhazelton

2324 posts in 1759 days


#3 posted 10-13-2016 11:55 AM

How this are we talking? If we’re talking almost a foil I’d use 3M spray adhesive sprayed on each surface, allowed to tack up and then affixed to each other. If you’re talking actual metal I’d use a two part epoxy with each surface roughed up with coarse paper really well.

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Cooler

270 posts in 306 days


#4 posted 10-13-2016 12:36 PM

For picture framing gold, imitation gold, silver, and imitation silver leaf are all available. Almost all “gold” frames are imitation leaf or simply gold painted. Real gold leaf is available and I’ve used it. I sourced from Genuine Gold and Burl in California. I have not had dealings with them in over 20 years so I don’t know if they are still in business.

Pre-finished moldings are the rule in picture framing. So I would try to find the right molding with the right finish first.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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doubleDD

5223 posts in 1506 days


#5 posted 10-13-2016 01:03 PM

Hi Ray. I used 2 part epoxy to attach 2×2’s to the metal rails for my lathe bed extension. (posted) No problems. Jim’s idea of contact cement would work also. We used a lot of that while on the job for metal to wood.
Hey I missed you Tuesday at Tim’s. He had a nice selection. Take care.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#6 posted 10-13-2016 01:21 PM

JB Weld

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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DrDirt

4169 posts in 3205 days


#7 posted 10-13-2016 01:58 PM

If you are doing leaf type work the above is the way to go.

If the metal is more rigid, like doing ‘hammered copper’ over a wood frame. I would use clear Silicone instead of a rigid epoxy bond, because the wood will still move.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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Cooler

270 posts in 306 days


#8 posted 10-13-2016 02:07 PM



If you are doing leaf type work the above is the way to go.

If the metal is more rigid, like doing hammered copper over a wood frame. I would use clear Silicone instead of a rigid epoxy bond, because the wood will still move.

- DrDirt

I agree. Or E6000 which is a flexible styrene based adhesive and is much stronger than silicone adhesive and excellent binding nonporous items.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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tyvekboy

1337 posts in 2476 days


#9 posted 10-13-2016 04:41 PM

I would also consider contact cement if the metal is not too rigid.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

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Cooler

270 posts in 306 days


#10 posted 10-13-2016 05:06 PM



I would also consider contact cement if the metal is not too rigid.

- tyvekboy

My experience is that you really have to rough up the glue side of the metal when using contact cement. It does not seem to adhere well to smooth nonporous surfaces. Sanding the glue surface with a very coarse grit will help. And of course there is no clamping required, an advantage.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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MrUnix

4221 posts in 1662 days


#11 posted 10-13-2016 05:59 PM

Look over here: Glue this to that – metal to wood

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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