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Forum topic by Jack Lewis posted 10-12-2016 11:38 PM 648 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jack Lewis

78 posts in 546 days


10-12-2016 11:38 PM

After several attempts at trying to eliminate the beetle tracks and remains left behind, it dawned upon me, the powdered remains left behind was a residue of the beetle’s elimination process as it chewed, digested and eliminated the wood fibers. Hence, these fecal products are infamously a breeding ground for nasty bacteria which could cause a serious infection if it was to enter into an open skin abrasion or cut. I now take precautions with any open skin cut or sore and preventive measures such as gloves. While gloves are not the best answer, I do use one on my hand nearest the cutting edge of gouges to protect from the heat and slivers of the high speed chips, all of which can break the skin. And after each rest session, which occurs more often nowadays, I lather my hands with a bacterial soap, just in case. This might seem like “hollering wolf” to some but we do what we have to do!

-- "Now we are getting no where, thanks to me"


7 replies so far

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 921 days


#1 posted 10-13-2016 03:36 AM

Another reason to buy KD lumber.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View Leo Van Der Loo's profile

Leo Van Der Loo

29 posts in 226 days


#2 posted 10-13-2016 06:11 AM

Heck this is about 60 years to late for me, I guess after ingesting some of the bug parts and frass I must be immune by now, haha

-- Have fun and take care

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1887 posts in 1602 days


#3 posted 10-13-2016 09:57 AM

If wearing a dust mask or respirator bug leavings not a problem. Yes, could kill all bugs in our turning wood if placed it in a heated kiln. Other than being too costly, risk of drying defects more probable.

I have encounter larvae still living and ants while tuning other than design change not a problem. My best guess is try to turn away those holes or tracks or leave as is. Here are few examples love or hate- em!

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/107560

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/NhGih26EkR8/hqdefault.jpg

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/OD1nDC0jy6A/hqdefault.jpg

This one of the many wood toxicity charts can find online bug and bug leaving least of our worries.

http://www.woodbin.com/ref/wood-toxicity-table/

-- Bill

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3393 posts in 1672 days


#4 posted 10-13-2016 11:12 AM

Jack,

Dietary Information
The live ones you can eat, a very high source of protein, a kinda human payback for white ants, just get a drinking straw and suck em up! no snorting them!

Other by products
The beetle tracks you can gather up and turn into shellac for food glazing or simply wood surface treatment

-- Regards Robert

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

452 posts in 1403 days


#5 posted 10-13-2016 11:22 AM

Contracting some sort of infection from bug excrement is probably near the bottom of the list in risks associated with wood working.

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1432 posts in 2231 days


#6 posted 10-13-2016 06:10 PM

Saturate the frass with CA – anything living after that won’t be.

-- BOVILEXIA: The urge to moo at cows from a moving vehicle.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#7 posted 10-13-2016 06:45 PM

After several attempts at trying to eliminate the beetle tracks and remains left behind, it dawned upon me, the powdered remains left behind was a residue of the beetle s elimination process as it chewed, digested and eliminated the wood fibers. Hence, these fecal products are infamously a breeding ground for nasty bacteria which could cause a serious infection if it was to enter into an open skin abrasion or cut.
- Jack Lewis

Can you point to any studies or research that supports that claim? Not all ‘poop’ is created equal, and wood boring insects have a very different digestive system than warm blooded critters. I have never seen or heard of any dangers to humans from frass, other than possible respiratory issues from breathing it (which is true for just about any powdered substance that is inhaled).

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You might want to cut back on your use of antibacterial soap as well – as the FDA recently noted, antibacterial products are no more effective than soap and water, and could be dangerous. Here is a good article at the Smithsonian that lists a few other reasons: Five Reasons Why You Should Probably Stop Using Antibacterial Soap

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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