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Glider rocker arms

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Forum topic by William Bentley Jr posted 07-02-2010 03:57 AM 2127 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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William Bentley Jr

79 posts in 2912 days


07-02-2010 03:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m currently working on a glider rocker (adirondack style) and would like to know if anyone can give me some insight on the location of the rocker arms or how to figure the location from the size of the chair! Glider arms are 8.5 inches center of bearings if that helps.

-- William, http://customwoodshop.webs.com , http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bentleys-Woodworking/217746434941356


4 replies so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5621 posts in 3738 days


#1 posted 12-13-2010 06:41 AM

An older post so this has probably been long resolved, but it struck a chord with me as I bought some hardware from Lee Valley a while ago and of course in my normally slow progress didn’t get around to installing the hardware ‘til recently. For the life of me I could not find the information sheet that originally came with the hardware and I was afraid that if I tried to figure it out that not only would I be slow in getting this project done but I’d also screw up the expensive hardware. So pride firmly being stomped on I contacted LV, explained why I was calling and ‘hey presto!’ not only did they explain to me how to install the hardware they both snail mailed and emailed me a pdf a copy of the instructions! I guess the moral of this story is check with the vendor, they can be really helpful!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

10535 posts in 3454 days


#2 posted 12-13-2010 02:57 PM

I’m sure there are some vendors that would be that helpful but, LV certainly leads the pack when it comes to customer service…...and product quality, too.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View EMagic's profile

EMagic

9 posts in 1269 days


#3 posted 06-15-2018 04:43 PM

Mounting your glider brackets in parallel (holes equally spaced top to bottom) will allow the glider to remain flat when it moves front to back (laterally – actually like a parallelogram). If you offset the holes, the top or bottom holes further apart this will produce a rocking effect in your chair/bench as it travels front-to-back. With top holes closer together, your chair will lift in the back as it travels back. If your top holes are further apart, your chair/bench will lift in the front as it travels back. see the photo (fig 2a). I suggest taking some strips of scrap stock and 4 pins to replicate the arms, and a top and bottom rail with holes spaced until you find what would be a suitable rocking effect. The closer your holes are (front to back) the more significant the rocking effect becomes. You will see this in your stock samples. I drilled two holes at 22” top and bottom rails, then drilled equally spaced increments on each piece about 1/2” apart and put the pins in several positions until I found which rock would be suitable. My arms were at 6.5” Center-to-Center. HTH

-- Eddie, Irmo, SC

View EMagic's profile

EMagic

9 posts in 1269 days


#4 posted 06-15-2018 05:41 PM



Mounting your glider brackets in parallel (holes equally spaced top to bottom) will allow the glider to remain in parallel when it moves front to back. See fig 1A in photo. If you offset the holes, it will produce a rocking effect in your chair/bench as it travels front-to-back. Top holes spaced closer than the bottom will lift the back as it travels front-to-back. Top holes spaced further apart than bottom will lift the chair in the front as it travels front-to-back. (see fig 2A & B)

I suggest taking some strips of scrap stock and 4 pins to replicate the arms, and a top and bottom rail with holes spaced until you find what would be a suitable rocking effect. The closer your holes are (front to back) the more significant the rocking effect becomes. You will see this in your stock samples. I drilled two holes at 22” top and bottom rails, then drilled equally spaced increments on each piece about 1/2” apart and put the pins in several positions until I found which rock would be suitable. My arms were at 6.5” Center-to-Center. HTH

parallelogram).

- EMagic


-- Eddie, Irmo, SC

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