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Advice on motor for pre-WWII Delta 1460 lathe

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Forum topic by madebyhand posted 10-11-2016 12:36 PM 1233 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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madebyhand

9 posts in 54 days


10-11-2016 12:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: delta rockwell lathe woodturning

I just purchased this pre-WWII lathe from a guy who’s dad bought it in New Zealand before the war. It’s the same lathe as the Delta 1460, just the international version. It came with a lot of accessories, including the jack shaft that slows the lathe speed down for metal turning, etc. However, the guy I bought it from didn’t have a motor. But he said it would be easy and very affordable to find a motor that would drive the lathe. He said I could probably even find something at Harbor Freight. However, I have no idea what motor I should look for. I’d like to keep it as affordable as I can, but have something that works great. I’m currently building a base/table and plan on outfitting the motor right under the table top and will mount the jack shaft on a lower shelf, and will connect the two to the headstock with link belts, like this similar lathe:

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!


36 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#1 posted 10-11-2016 01:02 PM

Ideally, you’d find out the speed and hp rating of the motor originally specified for that lathe and find one with the same specs. If you can’t determine that information, you’ll probably want a 1 hp (or maybe even larger if you plan to turn metal) 1725 rpm motor. The main thing you’ll have to determine is what speed motor you need to give you the spindle speed range with the pulley sizes you have. You should shoot for having the spindle turn around 150-200 rpm at your largest pulley reduction and around 4000 rpm at the smallest.

What a lovely machine! I’m very jealous ;-) And welcome to LumberJocks!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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madebyhand

9 posts in 54 days


#2 posted 10-11-2016 01:35 PM

Hey, thanks HokieKen! I appreciate your reply, even if I do live in UVa country! According to this article on the 1460 lathe, the 1460 wasn’t originally sold with a motor…the buyer had to get their own. In the 1950’s they started offering two additional options:

1. Catalog No. 46-311 included the basic 1460 lathe with the stand and the No. 82-710 1/2 H.P. motor.

2. Catalog No. 46-321 included the 16-speed lathe (the Jack shaft…which I have) with the stand and the motor.

This article also shows specs for two different motors:

(A) No. 62-610 1/2 H.P. Motor. Capacitor start, 115v., 1725 r.p.m., 1/2” diameter single shaft, ball bearing. With switch, cord and plug.

(B) No. 82-710 1/2 H.P. Motor. Capacitor start, 115v., 1725 r.p.m., with on-off switch.

So basically I have no idea what motor would work well for this lathe, nor where to buy it.

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#3 posted 10-11-2016 01:52 PM

Based on that info, I’d definitely go with a 1725 rpm motor. I’d look for something in the 3/4-1 hp range but 1/2 hp would probably work since that’s what was sold with it in those later models.

Here is a grizzly motor on Amazon that fits the bill. You should be able to find one similar for less $ if you do some digging online and check CL. If you find a few options and have questions, just post them and I’ll be glad to help where I can. As long as you don’t mention that “other school” again. ;-P

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1190 days


#4 posted 10-11-2016 02:14 PM

I have that lathe, or the US version. I have no idea what motor came with it originally, but I put a 2hp 3phase motor and use a 3hp Hitachi VFD on it.
It’s a pretty bullet proof machine built very sturdy. It’s not going to hurt it by changing to a larger motor, unless you want to keep it original…...A motor is a motor. It spins to produce a turning effect. The pulleys and horsepower are what determines the motors effectiveness.. If you are going to turn just spindles, stay with the smaller motor, but for bowls, go with a more substantial motor…........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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Roy Turbett

49 posts in 3039 days


#5 posted 10-11-2016 03:00 PM

+1 on a 1750 motor with a pulley configuration of 200 – 4000 RPM. Its also well worth the extra for 3 phase motor and a VFD. A 1 hp motor should be fine because of the limited swing. If you add riser blocks to turn larger bowls, a larger motor will help but is not absolutely necessary. I have a Powermatic 90 with riser blocks and the 1 hp motor with a VFD is adequate.

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madebyhand

9 posts in 54 days


#6 posted 10-11-2016 03:52 PM

Thanks guys! Sorry for my ignorance regarding motors (I’m more of a hand tool guy). So it sounds like a 1hp would be suitable. I was hoping to find a motor for under $100, rather than $188, so I’ll keep looking.

Not sure about doing 3phase as that would require getting 3 phase power into my workshop, right? And I’m sorry, but I’m not very clear about what a VFD is. What is it and do I need it? Budget is a big concern for me, so I’d love to get this running for as little $ as possible.

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#7 posted 10-11-2016 04:16 PM

The VFD (variable frequency drive) allows you to run a 3 phase motor on residential single phase service.

VFD is nice because you can control speed electronically but it’s definitely not a requirement. Just a regular single phase capacitor start motor will do nicely. Watch e-Bay as well as Craigslist. For your budget, I think what you’re going to be looking for is: 115 V Single Phase AC motor (or 230 V if you have service in your shop for it), 1/2 to 1 hp (the bigger, the better), 1725 rpm.

Edit: I would also look for ball bearing motors. Sleeve bearing will be cheaper but given the radial loading of the belt, won’t last nearly as long.

Also, as a rule, 3 phase motors will be cheaper than single phase in similar hp and speed ratings. So, if you can find a VFD at a good price, you may come out ahead going the route Jerry did.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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madebyhand

9 posts in 54 days


#8 posted 10-11-2016 04:53 PM

Would this motor work? More than I want to spend, but I’m not seeing much cheaper:

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-hp-agricultural-farm-duty-motor-68288.html

Thanks!

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#9 posted 10-11-2016 05:00 PM



Would this motor work? More than I want to spend, but I m not seeing much cheaper:

http://www.harborfreight.com/1-hp-agricultural-farm-duty-motor-68288.html

Thanks!

- madebyhand

Yes that one will work. It doesn’t say what kind of bearings it has so it’s probably sleeve bearings. Get a 20% off coupon and save yourself another $32. I’d say it’s worth a shot at that price at least.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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madebyhand

9 posts in 54 days


#10 posted 10-11-2016 06:42 PM

Thanks! Are Harbor Freight coupons easy to find?

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Wildwood

1881 posts in 1594 days


#11 posted 10-11-2016 07:25 PM

I would look for something better than a Harbor Freight motor, even if cost more. This one comes with 1 year waranty and better manual than will find at HF.

http://www.grizzly.com/products/Motor-1-HP-Single-Phase-1725-RPM-TEFC-110V-220V/G2532

Don’t know where you live but would check with local electric shop or supply house might find a better deal. Those old 1/2 HP motors bought back when lathe was new problably as good as today’s China made 1 HP.

-- Bill

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#12 posted 10-11-2016 07:40 PM



Thanks! Are Harbor Freight coupons easy to find?

- madebyhand

Yep. Here is where you can print one.

If you want to swing the extra $50 or so, the motor that Wildwood links is probably a better one. Although, the HF motor does have good reviews.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Rick M's profile (online now)

Rick M

7903 posts in 1840 days


#13 posted 10-12-2016 07:43 PM

Go buy an American motor for that American iron. Call a local motor shop and ask if they have a used Baldor or other quality motor for sale. 1/2hp will work but too weak IMO, I would want 1hp.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#14 posted 10-13-2016 11:09 AM



Go buy an American motor for that American iron. Call a local motor shop and ask if they have a used Baldor or other quality motor for sale. 1/2hp will work but too weak IMO, I would want 1hp.

- Rick M.


For the record, I agree with Rick completely. However, I don’t think you’re gonna hit that with your budget. If you do put the HF motor on there, go ahead and start saving some $ to replace it down the road. That is a killer lathe and at some point, you may find you want to beef up the drive.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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madebyhand

9 posts in 54 days


#15 posted 10-13-2016 11:56 AM

Thanks Rick & Kenny. I have no idea what kind of shop to look for. I looked up “motor shop” on Google maps and all that came up is auto shops.

BTW, both my wife’s parents are Hokies, and I used to live in Hokie country!

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