LumberJocks

Switching out a 220 volt motor to 110

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Blade66 posted 10-11-2016 01:47 AM 325 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Blade66's profile

Blade66

9 posts in 2493 days


10-11-2016 01:47 AM

I am looking change the motor on my TS from the 2hp 220volt to a 110 volt version if possible. Have moved and onlynplace I have to use the saw doesn’t have 220 volt, only option I see is to switch out the motors since the motor on my CT104 don’t appear to give the option of simply moving wires around on it. Just wondered if anybody has done this switch up and could recommend a good 110 volt motor to look for.


11 replies so far

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3667 posts in 1182 days


#1 posted 10-11-2016 02:16 AM

Your current motor should have a name plate identifying a frame size on it, sometime as shorthand listed behind “FR”. You’ll need to get one with the same frame for the purpose of mounting it where and how the current motor is. You’ll likely not find a true 2hp motor that will run on 120V, about 1.5hp true power is all you should expect from a reputable motor manufacturer when running on only 120V. You need to keep an eye on the full load amperage (FLA) and service factor amperage (SFA) on the new motor that will be replacing your current one and be sure you have the ampacity with your new service to run it.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#2 posted 10-11-2016 11:07 AM

What he said^^^. Also check motor rotation, most are reversible, some are not. It kind of sucks if it spins the wrong way.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#3 posted 10-11-2016 12:05 PM

Run a 240V circuit.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 587 days


#4 posted 10-11-2016 10:24 PM

Did you pull the cover plate off your existing motor? Many of these are 120/240 volts and it is merely a matter of moving a few wires around…usually explained on the inside motor plate.

View rbm328's profile

rbm328

10 posts in 343 days


#5 posted 10-12-2016 12:50 AM

my grizzly TS is 220/110 20a switchable

View Lee's profile (online now)

Lee

51 posts in 339 days


#6 posted 10-12-2016 04:33 AM

Ok, assuming the motor is not dual voltage, adding a dedicated 230 volt outlet is much cheaper and a lot easier than replacing the motor

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1744 posts in 600 days


#7 posted 10-12-2016 11:22 AM



Ok, assuming the motor is not dual voltage, adding a dedicated 230 volt outlet is much cheaper and a lot easier than replacing the motor

- Lee


Run a 240V circuit.

- rwe2156

+1 Assuming your service panel has the space, even if you don’t feel comfortable doing it yourself and have to pay an electrician, it’s not likely to cost much more than what a good 115V motor will run you and you won’t be sacrificing any power or performance by going to a smaller motor. As mentioned above, you’re not going to get a TRUE 2 hp motor that runs on 110. Beware of manufacturers that state their 110 motor outputs more than 1-1.5 hp.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

1134 posts in 174 days


#8 posted 10-12-2016 03:25 PM



Run a 240V circuit.

- rwe2156

AGREE

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Blade66's profile

Blade66

9 posts in 2493 days


#9 posted 10-12-2016 05:05 PM

Thanks for the replies, guys, unfortunately running a circuit is not an option for me since, the only place I can use my saw is in the garage at my work after hours of course. It’s set up for automotive repair of the fleet of cabs we service (I’m an auto tech during the day :))
The boss is not open to paying to run a 230V circuit just so I can use my tablesaw.

I think I will just sell the saw, as much as I hate to, for its a nice saw and I got a good deal on it but realistically got no where to use it because of the power issues, not to mention having moved and no longer have my own shop space anymore. Time to kneel in the end zone on this one.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

827 posts in 684 days


#10 posted 10-12-2016 05:17 PM

Auto fleet repair?

I’m surprised there is not a 220V source there already (welder, compressor, etc.)

A long extension cord to reach a welder outlet would be cheaper that either a new motor or circuit.

View Blade66's profile

Blade66

9 posts in 2493 days


#11 posted 10-12-2016 07:19 PM



Auto fleet repair?

I m surprised there is not a 220V source there already (welder, compressor, etc.)

A long extension cord to reach a welder outlet would be cheaper that either a new motor or circuit.

- splintergroup


There is several 220 circuits but are wired directly to the various units.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com