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Router table fence help.

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Forum topic by spclPatrolGroup posted 06-28-2010 07:36 PM 1351 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2355 days


06-28-2010 07:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question router

I built my router table using a top from rocker, below is a link. The fence is attached by two slots on either side, often i struggle trying to get the fence set perfectly parallel to the miter slot, I have been trying to come up with a solution to this, but havent thought of anything I am sold on yet. Any ideas?

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=21291


9 replies so far

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spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2355 days


#1 posted 06-28-2010 07:51 PM

To clarify my problem, I like to use one side of the fence to line up my piece, and I take the other side off, each side attaches to the angled aluminum in back. I was cutting some tendons on a tongue and groove bit, if the fence is angled, then depending on where you line up your piece on the fence, it may cut different depths.

I was thinking of mounting an Incra jig to my table, http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11494&filter=incra but I would have to find a way to mount it behind, as the picture shown looks to be a longer table than mine.

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Eric_S

1551 posts in 2656 days


#2 posted 06-28-2010 08:19 PM

I’m not sure I fully understand. You are just trying to have the fence parallel to the miter slot so that you can adjust depth of cut? You don’t need to. move the fence to the front of the bit and lock down one side. Then pivot the other side until you get the depth you want. By pivoting, you’ll change the angle you need to enter the table, but it will still be against the fence so it doesn’t matter. The depth is based on the perpendicular angle between fence and bit.

If you are actually trying to use the miter slot with the fence, then yes they need to be parallel. You can use a block of wood cut diaganolly into two wedges. attach one to the miter slot and the other along the fence. Loosen the fence and slide the miter so that the wedges meet and the fence adjusts parallel to the miter track. lock it down and your good to go.

Another option is to disregard the miter slot completely and make a sled for your fence.

-- - Eric Noblesville, IN

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spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2355 days


#3 posted 06-28-2010 08:43 PM

The problem with just using the fence is my piece is only 1.5” wide, and the bit is wider, which is why I use my miter gage, since it gives me something solid to hold it against. But I have been discusing with the wood working group at work, an idea for a home made tendoning jig that woudl rid along the fence.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3109 days


#4 posted 06-28-2010 09:09 PM

I’m not following.

on a router table, much like a drill press- the fence does not need to be parallel to the miter slot, and generally you either work with the miter slot, or the fence, but not at the same time – hence the no need for them to be aligned.

to set a depth of cut there are other methods like measuring bars, and test pieces.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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spclPatrolGroup

233 posts in 2355 days


#5 posted 06-28-2010 09:28 PM

hmm, basically I am running a 1.5” piece across a 3” bit, its very hard to do this without being able to hold it tight against a miter gage, even when holding it along with a scrap is hard to do, which is why I liked using my miter gage, but I think I have come up with plans for making a tendoning sled that will solve my problems.

With Fence

WithMiterGage

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3109 days


#6 posted 06-28-2010 09:33 PM

yeah a sled would be more suitable for this type of work.

mind you – even the Incra fences actually have the “miter” sled ride on the actual FENCE, and not in the miter slot, since you don’t really (practically can’t – it would be a waste of fence ‘reach’) align the fence to the miter slow on those tables.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2716 posts in 2747 days


#7 posted 06-28-2010 10:02 PM

Dave, I started to answer this, but decided I could show you pictures more clearly. I’ll try to take some tonight and get them to you later.

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

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Kent Shepherd

2716 posts in 2747 days


#8 posted 06-29-2010 08:15 PM

I do agree with using a sled, but if you want to set up your fence like you asked, here are the pictures I promised. I start by measuring the distance from the fence to the miter slot in the center. You need it as close as possible to being set right with the bit

Then measure each end and set the fence as straight as you can.

Clamp a piece like this to the miter gage and set it against the fence in the middle by the bit

Then move side to side in the slot. When it’s right, it will barely touch at every point. Adjust the fence as needed. This should just takes a few minitues. The biggest issue will be having the fence right to to bit. You may have to tweak it.

Hope this helps you
Kent

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

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ChrisCarr

196 posts in 2359 days


#9 posted 06-29-2010 09:34 PM

Instead of having to measure for alignment every time you could just add a t-square on your fence to ride the edge of the table. (the table edge will have to be square with your miter slot ofcourse.)

Take a look at the picture on this page (this is what i am talking about.)...

http://drlgroupllc.com/PHOTOS.aspx

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