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Forum topic by ScottM posted 10-06-2016 04:09 PM 367 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ScottM

346 posts in 1613 days


10-06-2016 04:09 PM

Not really sure if the title is correct, but I’m looking for technique advice for creating an effect like this one. How is the curved inlay piece created, or how would you create it? I can’t see creating it manually with a bandsaw since it would never end up being so smooth that clamping the pieces back together would not give gaps.

So would you create a template for the desired curve and then follow that template with a router and collar or bearing?

Just curious on how others see this done.


10 replies so far

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2227 days


#1 posted 10-06-2016 08:04 PM

That is not an inlay. It is simply a thin piece of dark wood sandwiched and glued between a curved cut lighter wood. Look at the end view.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2416 posts in 2388 days


#2 posted 10-06-2016 09:28 PM

Planeman40 has it right. That is how I did this front:

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View Halc's profile

Halc

133 posts in 1068 days


#3 posted 10-06-2016 09:54 PM

A link to a video is here:

https://youtu.be/lR9_CjQYZj4

If you’re a member of Fine Woodworking, printed instruction are at http://www.finewoodworking.com/2013/04/04/a-unique-cutting-board

I made the cutting board, but my inlays curved too sharply and I had a hard time with the glue up. Make sure your curves are gentle.

View bbrown's profile

bbrown

173 posts in 3018 days


#4 posted 10-07-2016 11:07 AM

This is just what I would call a “line”; looks like about a 1/16” thin strip. You need to make a template and then route out the shape. I do a lot of ‘Line and Berry’ type inlay which involves patterns built using parts of circles. For that I use the Lie-Nielson radius cuter, which is a wonderful, well-made tool. For straight lines I use a dremel on Stewart -MacDonald base and I clamp on a straight edge to use a guide. These cover almost all of my inlay uses; I do some very complex inlay for Federal furniture. But for this shape, I think a template would be best; you can use guide bushings with the template, but I don’t think that is necessary.

-- Forest, Virginia ; Micah 6:8

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ScottM

346 posts in 1613 days


#5 posted 10-07-2016 12:02 PM


That is not an inlay. It is simply a thin piece of dark wood sandwiched and glued between a curved cut lighter wood. Look at the end view.

- Planeman40

Yeah, I know that part. My question is, how the through curves are cut so smoothly? I’ve tried taking a piece of SYP and free hand a curved cut with my band saw but it looks like crap. So I’m wondering, how do I make it look good?

View Roger's profile

Roger

19883 posts in 2270 days


#6 posted 10-07-2016 12:35 PM

Yeah, I know that part. My question is, how the through curves are cut so smoothly? I ve tried taking a piece of SYP and free hand a curved cut with my band saw but it looks like crap. So I m wondering, how do I make it look good?

- ScottM

Try a new bs blade

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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Planeman40

805 posts in 2227 days


#7 posted 10-07-2016 12:59 PM

Most likely the curve was cut on a bandsaw and machine sanded with the outer curve sanded with a floor mounted belt sander and the inner curve sanded with a drum sander. I would imagine some touch-up work would be needed with hand sanding using flat and curved sanding blocks. If you are concerned about the ragged edge left by the band saw blade, you may want to try honing the side of the bandsaw blade while it is running with a fine sharpening stone to remove some of the sharp edges from the set teeth. This makes a smoother cut, but it also reduces to some degree the ability to cut a tight curve radius.

As to the ability to follow the line of the curve when sawing, that comes with practice. Rather than cutting down the center of a penciled line, learn to cut down the edge of the line with the edge of the bandsaw blade just kissing the edge of the line.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

872 posts in 1750 days


#8 posted 10-07-2016 02:48 PM

Here is another good video on the technique:
http://youtu.be/p1lyz1p7C2s

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

215 posts in 928 days


#9 posted 10-07-2016 04:12 PM



Here is another good video on the technique:
http://youtu.be/p1lyz1p7C2s

- SuperCubber

Good video.

-- John

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

346 posts in 1613 days


#10 posted 10-07-2016 04:41 PM


Here is another good video on the technique:
http://youtu.be/p1lyz1p7C2s

- SuperCubber

Good video.

- bigJohninvegas

Definitely. I think this is what I was looking for. In watching it, I was wondering if it would have been easier, and cleaner, if he kept lowering the router bit to cut all the way through instead of splitting the groove with the band saw. Either way, I think this was what I was looking for. Thanks for the link!

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