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Forum topic by birdguy posted 06-28-2010 05:42 AM 1202 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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birdguy

73 posts in 1574 days


06-28-2010 05:42 AM

I am intrested in getting a good set of chisel but want to spend no more thain 150$ on the set who makes a good set that also holds a good edge I don’t use them a lot but its v nice when I need them I prefer wooden handel and want a min of 4 chisels more like 6 or 8 but quality comes first as long as I can get outher sizes later of the same type


13 replies so far

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swirt

1945 posts in 1639 days


#1 posted 06-28-2010 03:39 PM

The Narex chisels at Highland Woodworking were very highly rated by FineWoodworking last year. (Caused their price to go up by $10 too). www.highlandwoodworking.com/narexboxed6-piecebenchchiselset.aspx They were rated highly for edge retention and finish.

The only drawback I see is that they are metric, but that rarely comes into play as a problem. I haven’t used them as most of mine are refurbished old Stanley’s but if I were in a market for new, I would give them a shot.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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live4ever

983 posts in 1677 days


#2 posted 06-28-2010 05:20 PM

+1 on the Narex. I got them last year and they are a tremendous value.

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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DrDirt

2474 posts in 2409 days


#3 posted 06-28-2010 06:18 PM

Stanley re-introduced their 750 chisel style as the new “Sweetheart” not sure what the set goes for but this is the model that Lie Nielson patterned their chisels after, and they are awesome!

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

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birdguy

73 posts in 1574 days


#4 posted 06-28-2010 06:48 PM

I saw a two cherries set how they hold up?

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Woodcanuck

128 posts in 1667 days


#5 posted 06-28-2010 06:53 PM

Another plus for the Narex ones. I got a set from Lee Valley last year and I’ve been pretty happy with them so far. I haven’t put them through their paces too much, but I’ll be working on a project shortly that will give them more of a challenge.

Swirt: Interesting that you got metric ones…mine are imperial measurements, I guess they make both.

-- Ian - Life's a game, if you don't play, you can't win.

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a1Jim

112170 posts in 2244 days


#6 posted 06-28-2010 07:05 PM

even if you use chisels on a regular bases Marple’s works well and hold up well for around $60 you can get a set of six. I have much more expenses chisels but always go back to my Marple’s . Just because they don’t cost $200 each doesn’t mean there bad chisels. I’ve had one set for more than 20 years. So unless your looking to impress someone Marple’s work great.

http://www.amazon.com/Irwin-Industrial-M444-SB6N-6-Piece/dp/B000RG2Y56

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000294/3621/Irwin-Blue-Chip-Chisel-Set-8-piece---Best-Value.aspx?refcode=05INFROO

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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swirt

1945 posts in 1639 days


#7 posted 06-28-2010 07:48 PM

@Ian, are you sure they are imperial? Leevalley lists them as metric too. I don’t have them, just read the reviews and was planning to buy them, then ran across a good collection of vintage Stanleys and went that way instead.

The article in Finewoodworking (Issue 200) was nice because they compared them in use then examined the edges to see how well they held up. The Narex edged out the Irwin because they had the same edge retention rating, but has smaller flats on the side which made them better for dovetailing. The Narex even edged out the LieNielsens in Chopping but lost to LN in dovetailing and ergonomics. Tied the LN in edge retention and “out of the box” which is impressive.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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Mike67

96 posts in 2003 days


#8 posted 06-28-2010 09:22 PM

Suggest you also look at the wood handled footprint chisels. I really like the balance and they hold up pretty well. They’re not mentioned often but you’ll see they did well in that FW article.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1665 days


#9 posted 06-29-2010 01:55 AM

What type of chisels are you looking for? Just bevel edged bench chisels? Firmers? Mortisers?

For bevel edged chisels, I have been happy with my Grizzly Japanese chisels. They seem to be nice general use chisels. Cheap enough and the quality seems fine.

A lot of the European bevel edged chisels like 2 Cherries, Hirsch, Sandvik are quality.

The Crown chisels that Woodworker.com sells as Mortise chisels are actually pretty nice (Although I would call them registered firmers rather than mortisers.)

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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birdguy

73 posts in 1574 days


#10 posted 06-29-2010 02:15 AM

Just a regular type didn’t know of so maany types sompting for general use clean up a cut/dado
Square corners…..

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1665 days


#11 posted 06-29-2010 02:53 AM

That sounds like some bevel edge chisels.

Also decide if you would like some of the nice long paring chisels that really reach down into places.

Some come with a bend and are called cranked neck chisels. Real knuckle savers.

These particular examples are a little more expensive than your target price but you might consider getting a few single cheap but usable bench chisels. If you just get a “set” of chisels that you might not really get as much use out of them. Put the real money where it will do the most good for something special that matches what work you do.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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a1Jim

112170 posts in 2244 days


#12 posted 06-29-2010 05:43 AM

Those are beautiful David ,but if BG is going to to have one set of chisels I would not want chisels that long the kind of work I do I’ve never needed chisels that long even though I have a set that long . It’s hard to control a chisel that long for dovetail work or cleaning up tenons.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1665 days


#13 posted 06-29-2010 06:49 AM

Jim:

I completely agree with you.That is exactly why I was quizzing him a little to find out what he was going to do with them. It hurts sometimes to pay a premium price for a single chisel instead of a discounted price for a complete set, but I would recommend anyone to have fewer sizes of chisels and more types.

Also, if he wants to get a few sizes and then fill in the others to match as he goes, I would stay with one of the brands that will have matching pieces available in the long run. Maybe a nice starter set of Sorby or Lie-Nielsen that he will be able to get fills if it is important to him for them to match. I have a few odd ones that really feel alien when I pick them up because I am not used to the feel of them. Matched handle styles make that a lot easier to deal with.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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