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Making Prototypes

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Forum topic by TTF posted 10-05-2016 04:03 AM 454 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TTF

154 posts in 2645 days


10-05-2016 04:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw jig

One of the things I need to do with my new table saw set-up is figure out the storage and availability of all the stuff that goes with it: push sticks, blades, feather boards, pencils … lots more. I easily get into analysis-paralysis / pinterest overload trying to figure out what to do.

I decided to slap together the simplest and cheapest prototype cart I could to get going, so I could solidify my ideas. Anyone else take this approach?

This might lead to better ideas, or may still be there 10 years from now.

-- Troy | http://tf-workshop.com | The more I see nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator. - Louis Pasteur


21 replies so far

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a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#1 posted 10-05-2016 04:16 AM

When making something I really want to be just right I make a prototype too.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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tomd

2027 posts in 3238 days


#2 posted 10-05-2016 05:33 AM

Looks fine to me.

-- Tom D

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BurlyBob

3697 posts in 1733 days


#3 posted 10-05-2016 05:56 AM

Troy if it fits and works it’s a success. I think you solved your issue quite nicely. Now come on over and give me some ideas.

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Redoak49

1964 posts in 1456 days


#4 posted 10-05-2016 10:47 AM

I often do that. Making a prototype out of cheap materials before expensive ones makes sense to me.

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Lazyman

706 posts in 855 days


#5 posted 10-05-2016 01:05 PM

Will your crosscut sled fit on top of the cart? If not maybe making the cart just a little shorter would work? One of the annoyances in my shop is figuring out where to put the sled when I am not using it but I want it to be handy, since I switch back and forth quite a bit.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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jbay

819 posts in 367 days


#6 posted 10-05-2016 01:15 PM

I prototype everything in Sketchup.
You don’t actually get to feel it, but it gives you a pretty good reality of it,
and it’s easier to make changes to.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#7 posted 10-05-2016 01:29 PM

If I am making mulitples, then I make prototypes, otherwise I sketch it out and start building.

Wood dowels on the sides of the rolling cart will carry the blades easily. Use about 1/2” diameter, drill on an angle so that the dowel will slant upwards slightly and leave it about 2” long.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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Fred Hargis

3950 posts in 1961 days


#8 posted 10-05-2016 01:30 PM

Pretty much what I did:

Not sure why the photo looks so fuzzy, but the box in the bottom section holds my blades, several partitions across the width gives each it’s own slot…to make it easier to see what I want I labeled each slot with the blade that’s in it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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JBrow

822 posts in 388 days


#9 posted 10-05-2016 02:27 PM

TTF,

I built an immobile cabinet that completely filled the cavity under the extension table. A shelf is mounted about the midway up from the bottom. A tall drawer on slides fills the lower part of the cabinet. The drawer keeps me from stooping to retrieve items in the back of the cabinet near the floor. The slides make pulling out the drawer easier, especially since its contents are heavy. The doors have an interior recess where I can hang various table saw tools such as the arbor wrench, inserts, and etc. The outside of the doors are where the push sticks and a pocket holds the mitre gauge. A series of selves built as a separate unit set on the shelf and are home to feather boards. The cabinet is dimensioned to allow access to the table saw adjusting bevel handle. A panel sled sets between the metal support legs and the cabinet.

This cabinet has worked well over the years. The only problem is when I have stowed the mitre gauge with an auxiliary fence attached. The auxiliary fence can sometimes interfere with the opening of the door.

In your case a similarly wide cabinet could be built, wider than the one you show. But to do so, the metal support legs would have to be moved to the edge of the table saw extension table. Alternatively, the cabinet could be outfitted with a pair of leg levelers mounted on the top of the cabinet and adjusted to provide support to the extension table and thus eliminate the metal legs altogether.

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Rick Dennington

5183 posts in 2662 days


#10 posted 10-05-2016 03:59 PM

TTF,

I don’t make prototypes of projects or jigs and fixtures…I get a design or plan in my head of what I want to build, and then sit sown at my drafting table and lay it out….scratching my head and erasing a lot till I get it the way I want it….It’s a good thing I got a degree in mechanical drafting…lol….It helps..!! Nearly all the shop furniture, work benches, and jigs are done this way….Very seldom do I use another plan from magazines, but I have in the past a few times when I see a project I really like, and don’t need to design it myself…...

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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TTF

154 posts in 2645 days


#11 posted 10-06-2016 02:11 AM

Bob – I do need to get out your way sometime.

-- Troy | http://tf-workshop.com | The more I see nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator. - Louis Pasteur

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TTF

154 posts in 2645 days


#12 posted 10-06-2016 02:14 AM

Lazyman – Actually, the crosscut sled stays right where it’s at. That’s table saw #2 just for cross-cutting. Like you said, I switch back and forth a lot, so I set this up to rip and crosscut in two places without changing anything. The Sawstop for ripping is new, and the craftsman for crosscutting is 20 years old.

-- Troy | http://tf-workshop.com | The more I see nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator. - Louis Pasteur

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TTF

154 posts in 2645 days


#13 posted 10-06-2016 02:15 AM

Fred – that’s a nice cart. I may do the same with blade storage.

-- Troy | http://tf-workshop.com | The more I see nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator. - Louis Pasteur

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TTF

154 posts in 2645 days


#14 posted 10-06-2016 02:18 AM

JBrow – I had thought of doing a larger cabinet and getting rid of the support leg. I may still do that. I like the space yours affords. I’m going to play with the small one, but ultimately may want more room.

-- Troy | http://tf-workshop.com | The more I see nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator. - Louis Pasteur

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TTF

154 posts in 2645 days


#15 posted 10-06-2016 02:29 AM

I most often make drawings as well (I use Visio, but there are lots of tools, including the drawing board). They only get me so far – maybe it’s the way my brain works. I like to have something solid in front of me if possible.

I’m going to build another similar style cart that goes on the left side of the saw. It will be a bit thinner and sit partially under the wing and behind the switch box. I’ll get it out when I’m running the saw, and put it away when I’m not. I’m left-handed, and I naturally want to reach in that direction for things.

-- Troy | http://tf-workshop.com | The more I see nature, the more I am amazed at the Creator. - Louis Pasteur

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