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Forum topic by mike02130 posted 10-04-2016 05:31 PM 228 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mike02130

95 posts in 132 days


10-04-2016 05:31 PM

Hello, all,

I’m familiar with spindle turning but now I would like to try some bowl turning. Something I know very little about.

Q1,
I have an old Delta lathe from the 1930’s with an 11” swing with a four step pulley set up. I calculated the slowest speed at around 750 RPMs. Is that slow enough? I suppose I could switch to a smaller motor pulley if need be.

Q2,
What would be the most proper or most used gouge for bowl turning?

Q3,
I was thinking about purchasing a Vicmarc VM 100 chuck. Is there a reason not to go with this chuck?

Thanks guys, I’m sure you’ll steer me straight or confuse me more.

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.


5 replies so far

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1658 days


#1 posted 10-04-2016 05:52 PM

Q1: If you can get the blank reasonably balanced first, then you should be ok. I have an old Delta similar to what you have, and the slowest it can go is around 900 RPM… with blanks rounded out on the bandsaw first, I’ve been able to do 8-9” bowls (the lathe only has a 10” max swing) without any problems. It’s a bit rough until you get them completely rounded and balanced, but that is just the first few minutes, and it gets nice and smooth after that.

Can’t really help on the other two – I have no idea what my turning tools are named and just use what works best (plus I have lots of homemade turning tools that I’ve never named :) I also don’t have a chuck, and instead just use a thread tap to make my own faceplate/glueblocks from scrap wood that get glued directly onto the blank.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1658 days


#2 posted 10-04-2016 06:18 PM

Is this your lathe?

(from the 1939 Delta tool catalog)

If so, that is the precursor to the one I have (the 46-110) which is almost identical, and with the original motor/pulley setup, has the same speeds – or 900rpm as the slowest it can go. The closer you can get the blank to round before mounting, the better – as otherwise it can get a bit wild at first :)

Alternatively, I’m looking at swapping the motor out with a variable speed DC motor. Combined with the 4 step pulley, will give it a really wide speed range from super slow to crazy fast, and everything in between.

Also, it’s not specified in the manual, so you need to verify what size spindle you have… if it’s anything like mine, it’s not a very standard size (3/4”-10tpi), which limits your chuck selection (and another great reason to get that thread tap and make your own :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mike02130

95 posts in 132 days


#3 posted 10-04-2016 06:28 PM

Brad, that’s it. I put a smaller four step pulley on the motor to reduce the speeds. It went from 900 to about 760 rpms. I have a counter shaft laying around that I could set up. 16 speeds?

What do you mean by “thread tap”? What is it you’re tapping?

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1658 days


#4 posted 10-04-2016 06:39 PM

What do you mean by “thread tap”? What is it you re tapping?
- mike02130

Tap threads in a block of wood that will screw directly onto the spindle. You can make all sorts of stuff out of scrap wood – faceplates/glueblocks, mandrels, jam chucks, etc…

Easy to make out of scrap material. Drill a hole, tap it, mount it on the lathe and turn it round. And they are re-usable – if it gets too short from parting off the bowl (or whatever), just glue another piece of wood to it and round it out.

As for bowls specifically – here are two faceplate/glueblocks glued onto some bowl blanks before turning. They just get screwed directly onto the spindle – and may even be marginally safer… I’ve never had a bowl come off yet, but have seen plenty of videos where bowls have gone flying out of a chuck :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mike02130

95 posts in 132 days


#5 posted 10-04-2016 07:08 PM

That looks Scarry enough to try. I looked up taps and found them, and now I understand. So do I even need a chuck?

-- If the tool was invented after the Depression, I don't need it.

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