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How to keep Formica air table top smooth and slippery

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Forum topic by stoutrugby posted 10-04-2016 05:22 PM 216 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stoutrugby

6 posts in 317 days


10-04-2016 05:22 PM

Topic tags/keywords: buffing table top formica sliding slippery non friction

I am sliding vinyl sash windows across my air table top which is made of Formica, but I still see rub spots on my vinyl. The sash floats very well, so I’m thinking there might often be high points either on the table or the parts. There is also really good air lift, so I’m puzzled. I’m hoping to put something on the Formica to be buffed in aiding in smoothness helping reduce any abrasive contact. The last 9 inches on the outer edges of my table does not have air, so by putting something on and buffing it, I’d hope that would help protect those areas from rubbing the sash.

Any comments are greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.


3 replies so far

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clin

510 posts in 456 days


#1 posted 10-05-2016 05:11 PM

Since it’s been a day, I’ll chime in. I don’t understand what you are talking about.

It sounds like something very specific to manufacturing windows and moving them around on a works surface that holds them up with air. Like an air hockey table. Am I getting warm?

I figured it was something others understood, but since there’s been no response, I’m thinking you need to explain this better to get some help. Photos are always a plus.

-- Clin

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stoutrugby

6 posts in 317 days


#2 posted 10-05-2016 05:52 PM

It is exactly like an air hockey table top. I called the manufacture of the Formica and they gave me a lead on a California based company that makes a Plastic Polisher/Cleaner that fills in micropores and it also helps deter dust collection. The product is called Plexus and I have a case being shipped here tomorrow, so I can do a trial if I like it or not. They guaranteed me it’s perfect for my application, but we shall see..
Thanks for touching base

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MrUnix

4203 posts in 1659 days


#3 posted 10-05-2016 06:10 PM

I called the manufacture of the Formica and they gave me a lead on a California based company that makes a Plastic Polisher/Cleaner that fills in micropores and it also helps deter dust collection.
- stoutrugby

Sounds like you could get the same results with ordinary paste wax… I know it works great on my auxiliary planer beds and other Formica faced fixtures and jigs.

Edit: I took a look at the Plexus web site (http://www.plexusplasticcleaner.com/about.html) and noticed some interesting bits of information. One little snippet says this:

Dissatisfied with these cleaners, many people resort to products that are petroleum-based. Unfortunately, these products can dry out plastic, leading to cracking and discoloration over time.

So they claim that petroleum based products can cause problems with plastic. But if you look at the MSDS for the stuff, it’s primary carrier (almost 25%) is a petroleum distillate. Huh?

It also goes on to say:

Plexus protects plastic more effectively than ordinary cleaners. Because Plexus seals the pores in plastic surfaces with a micro-thin layer of shiny, protective wax [...]

So in essence, it’s a spray on wax product, similar to stuff like Boshield (which, according to it’s MSDS, is basically just paraffin wax and mineral oil suspended in a petroleum distillate – or more specifically, mineral spirits). I guess it doesn’t do much good now that you have ordered – but I would have tried some Johnsons paste wax first. Much cheaper and you can get it at your local grocery store – or you probably already have some on hand if you have any cast iron machines in your shop!

While the Plexus site doesn’t say -what- wax it uses, the most common is paraffin. It’s what is used in Boshield, and Johnsons (along with Caranuba and microcrystalline waxes).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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