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RAS Blades suggestions

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Forum topic by DirtyMike posted 10-03-2016 12:22 AM 364 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


10-03-2016 12:22 AM

Hello all, I recently picked up an old Dewalt radial arm saw, With your help i was able to diagnose and fix the problem that kept someone else from buying it. I have went through the saw completely and she is ready for a blade. I would love to have a 10 inch full kerf blade with a flat bottom grind or a triple grind that leaves a flat bottom and of course a negative hook angle. I have found the infinity 010-380 and was wondering if anyone here has experience with it. Thanks


21 replies so far

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2838 days


#1 posted 10-03-2016 01:23 AM

The Infinity blades that I’ve used so far have been awesome, but the 010-380 isn’t among those I’ve tried. No reason not to expect it to be really good, though it’s worth noting that a triple chip grind (TCG) doesn’t leave a truly flat bottom. The chamfered tooth will protrude slight above the flat raker teeth, leaving a slight trough in the middle of the kerf. Only a flat top grind (FTG) will leave a truly flat bottom.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Fred Hargis

3937 posts in 1956 days


#2 posted 10-03-2016 11:29 AM

I would be interested in your experience with it, should you choose to buy it. Normally I would suggest the Freud LU91 for your use, but it won’t meet the criteria you described. You can get about anything you want from Forrest, though the blade would be made to order and more expensive.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


#3 posted 10-05-2016 05:44 AM

Thanks Scott, I now understand why there are not a lot of FTG crosscutting blades. I will probably get the LU91 and save a few bucks. I am currently running an 80 tooth 10 degree atb Amana blade the came on my unisaw and wow can they make a blade, but they are way out of budget for me. Is there a common favorite 10 inch blade that RAS owners use?

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2530 days


#4 posted 10-05-2016 09:34 AM

When I still had one, I preferred the Forrest WWI it did a very good job.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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greenacres2

251 posts in 1631 days


#5 posted 10-05-2016 10:47 AM

I don’t think it shows up on the Forrest web site, but they do make a WWI specifically for the old-school RAS market. There’s a Dewalt RAS discussion group and full details on that blade are in the FAQ page, but you do have to call in the order instead of just ordering online. I’m running an Amana 60 tooth on my GWI, will check the number tonight but it’s a great blade for the saw.
earl

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Fred Hargis

3937 posts in 1956 days


#6 posted 10-05-2016 11:03 AM

If you call Forrest and ask for the Mr. Sawdust blade, that’s the one they mention over at the Dewalt forum. Apparently Wally Kunkel developed it with the Forrest guys. There’s another Freud blade they like (not the LU91) and I can’t recall which one it is. Either of those become more useful if you rip on the RAS. I don’t, so the LU91 is the one I put on my last 3 Dewalts. But it sucks for ripping.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


#7 posted 10-05-2016 05:55 PM

Thanks again, Ripping is the one thing I will probably never do on the RAS. I mainly got it for crosscutting, CC dados, and 45 half laps. I have yet to fine tune my saw but already I am very impressed with the old dewalts and i understand why they are making a comeback. Fred, per your suggestion I will stick with freud for my RAS. thanks

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2838 days


#8 posted 10-05-2016 07:26 PM



... I will probably get the LU91 and save a few bucks. ...
- DirtyMike

The LU91 is a good blade, but isn’t full kerf. It’s got a kerf of 0.090”...just under 3/32”.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


#9 posted 10-05-2016 07:29 PM

Indeed it is, thanks Scott.

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Fred Hargis

3937 posts in 1956 days


#10 posted 10-05-2016 08:51 PM

I finally found the other Freud blade, they (the Dewalt forum) are singing praises about the LU83. Now, it has a 10º hook, which makes it too aggressive for me…but if you rip (this is expected on that forum) it will perform better than the LU91. It will also self-feed more and not cut as smoothly. I limit my saw to cross grain cuts and find the negative hook angle much easier to manage. Apparently the Forrest blade that I mentioned earlier (the Mr. Sawdust blade) is a triple chip grind with a 5º hook angle.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


#11 posted 10-05-2016 10:22 PM

Thanks Fred, I have a LU83 and its a good blade, but I would have never thought to put it on a RAS due to the hook angle. I can already tell that I dont care for the blade self feeding, My understanding is that a negative hooked blade will help with material climbing up the fence which is safer. My main goal is to make cutting on the RAS as safe as possible, I have read a ton of horror stories. thanks again

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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


#12 posted 10-07-2016 07:40 PM

Well I have decided on the LU91 but now i am torn is to what size. My saw can run up to a 12 and believe it has more than enough power. The added inch of cut would come in handy and the price difference is minimal. I would get a bushing machined to fit the 1 inch hole on my 5/8 arbor. I am guessing that my saw would have to be setup dead nuts accurate to get precise cuts with a bigger blade. I am missing something, Is there any reason not to run a 12 inch blade.

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Fred Hargis

3937 posts in 1956 days


#13 posted 10-07-2016 08:00 PM

These blades are thin kerf, and they might flex a little more in the larger size. I don’t remember which saw you have, but if it had the power I personally would get the larger blade.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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DirtyMike

454 posts in 365 days


#14 posted 10-07-2016 08:12 PM

Thanks fred, I dont know exactly what saw i have either. It looks identical to the 1963 dewalt 1501, I believe mine is an earlier model before they marketed them as the power shop. I scoured the internet and and deplhi dewalt forums trying to find the exact model number and have come up with nothing. Apparently the model and serial number is on the motor cover, which i dont have. I feel like i would regret not getting a 12.

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Roy Turbett

53 posts in 3043 days


#15 posted 10-08-2016 01:16 AM

I have a DeWalt GWI that will take either a 10” or 12” blade. I prefer to use 10” blades because they deliver more torque with less deflection. I’ve used both negative hook blades and the 10 degree positive hook Freud LU84 and prefer the Freud. The LU84R is a full kerf 50 tooth ATBR combination blade with 4 alternate teeth followed by a raker tooth. The LU83R is the thin kerf version of the same blade. I also use a Forrest blade stiffener even though Freud says one isn’t needed because I think it improves performance.

The terms “climbing” and “self-feeding” refer to two different things. Climbing is when the blade literally climbs on top of the workpiece. This is caused when the saw isn’t properly tuned and there is either vertical play in the arm or the table slopes from back to front.

Self-feeding can also be cause by improper tuning where the carriage bearings are too loose or the saw isn’t level and slopes from back to front. It can also be caused by blade selection. A positive hook angle will pull the blade forward and the greater the hook angle the greater the pull. However, a 5 to 10 degree positive hook angle on a properly tuned saw is not an issue if you are aware of it. You should also be aware that a negative hook angle will not prevent climbing and self-feeding if the saw isn’t properly tuned.

Wally Kunkle’s book “Mastering the Radial Arm Saw” is a good reference but I think Jon Eakes’ book “Fine Tuning a Radial Arm Saw” is even better.

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