LumberJocks

Thinning urethane/oil (danish oil) & polyurethane mixture

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by JerryLH posted 10-02-2016 11:48 PM 330 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 773 days


10-02-2016 11:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing

Good day all. Once ‘again’ I’m in the need of your knowledge (thanks). The title is part of my question but my main question is how thin can one thin a given finish (lacquers, urethane, oil, polyurethanes)? I know – large question – large with a capital ‘L’. Via my illiteracy – I have mixed Watco Danish Oil with a polyurethane, applied it – it looks good – but, so does my car when I spray it down with water. Since I have already mixed this concoction – 1. will it adhere (long term) 2. how thin could this concoction be thinned with mineral spirits (if # 1. works)?
Question 3. how thin can one thin the following and still work as an effective finish?
a. Lacquer – 25% – 50% – 75/100%
b. polyurethane
c. shellac
d. oil/urethane
e. oil

Thanks & Regards – jerry

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok


11 replies so far

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#1 posted 10-03-2016 01:47 AM

You reach a point of diminishing return by thinning too much. The solvent evaporates and when it does you are left with very little finish. The only way to compensate is add more coats. So if you take some standard finish and it takes 4 coats to get the look you want, if you thin it 50/50 it will take 8 coats to get the same final finish. If you thin it 25/75 it will take 16 coats and so on, life is too short. I never thin more than 50:50.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View punkin611's profile

punkin611

31 posts in 284 days


#2 posted 10-03-2016 02:19 AM

bondogaposis is right on about the effects of thinning finish as long as you use the appropriate thinner. I would not use Danish oil as a thinner on poly as it is just as thick as poly. The best tip I EVER had about oil poly was from a old salt that worked as a painter in a drydock. I saw him slapping on oil poly from a old bucket that was crusty from dried varnish it look as good as I have ever seen. He winked and told me the secret; he said you got to thin the varnish—- 50/50 with mineral spirits

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 773 days


#3 posted 10-03-2016 02:39 AM

Thanks for the feedback – 50/50 is the rule of thumb info I was looking for. Thanks again.
I do have another question. It seems no matter what lengths I go to, to remove dust from my work area, I still get dust nibs in my finish. It seems no matter how fine I go with my wet/dry sandpaper (I’ve gone up to 2400) in removing the nibs – I can see the haze created by my attempts to remove the nibs (without creating the haze)? OK – that’s it for—the moment.

Regards, Jerry

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#4 posted 10-03-2016 11:21 AM

Dust nibs seem to be a fact of life, you would probably need a NASA “clean room” to completely escape them. Two suggestions for you to try: the first and easiest is to wait until the finish is fairly hard (several days at least) and rub it with kraft paper wadded up into a ball (that’s the old brown grocery bag trick). This works really well, but if the finish is soft can leave striations. The second is to do as you are (stop around 1000 grit, and them apply a coat of wiping varnish, this the varnish thinned 50/50 with MS that punkin mentioned. This should tack up quickly enough that the dust won’t have a chance to affect…though there may still be a few spots. All this is improved greatly if you have an ambient air cleaner that you runn a few hours before finishing. That can be a homemade one using a recycled furnace fan with some tight filtration filters (think Filtrete Ultra-a allergen) in it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 773 days


#5 posted 10-03-2016 02:17 PM

Thank you so much for your feedback – I greatly appreciate those who are willing to share what they’ve learned with others.

Regards, Jerry

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5175 posts in 2656 days


#6 posted 10-03-2016 03:22 PM

What I usually do on a fine piece of furniture is I put 2 coats of clear Danish oil on, let it dry good for 2-3 days between coats (after the final sanding), then put 4-5 coats of poly over the oil, (not thinned), and lightly sanding in between coats….When I do the in-between coats, I turn on my air cleaner to scrub the air of fine particles hanging in the air, so they won’t settle on the project while it dries…..About the only finish I thin is tung oil w/a 4:1 ratio….One part oil to 4 parts of mineral spirits…..Sometimes a 50/50 mix, but not often…..On some projects that thins it too much, and you have to use more coats…On the final finishes, I run the air cleaner about 2+ hours to “clear the air”....

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 773 days


#7 posted 10-03-2016 11:21 PM


What I usually do on a fine piece of furniture is I put 2 coats of clear Danish oil on, let it dry good for 2-3 days between coats (after the final sanding), then put 4-5 coats of poly over the oil, (not thinned), and lightly sanding in between coats….When I do the in-between coats, I turn on my air cleaner to scrub the air of fine particles hanging in the air, so they won t settle on the project while it dries…..About the only finish I thin is tung oil w/a 4:1 ratio….One part oil to 4 parts of mineral spirits…..Sometimes a 50/50 mix, but not often…..On some projects that thins it too much, and you have to use more coats…On the final finishes, I run the air cleaner about 2+ hours to “clear the air”....

- Rick Dennington

Thank You Rick.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

132 posts in 278 days


#8 posted 10-04-2016 12:23 AM

Watco Danish Oil already contains polyurethane varnish. Why mix?

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 773 days


#9 posted 10-04-2016 03:02 AM

I had a part of a can of General oil/urethane satin – I had a can of high gloss polyurethane. I wanted something in between.

Regards, Jerry

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

View punkin611's profile

punkin611

31 posts in 284 days


#10 posted 10-05-2016 03:38 AM

I wanted to add; use gloss varnish, satin has a flatting agent in it that gives uneven results. With gloss you can made it satin with 0000 steel wool, it as takes care of the dust nibs. Also buy varnish in 1/2 pints because it does not keep good for a long time.

View JerryLH's profile

JerryLH

104 posts in 773 days


#11 posted 10-05-2016 02:07 PM



I wanted to add; use gloss varnish, satin has a flatting agent in it that gives uneven results. With gloss you can made it satin with 0000 steel wool, it as takes care of the dust nibs. Also buy varnish in 1/2 pints because it does not keep good for a long time.

- punkin611

Thanks again for the feedback. Lumberjock’s (members) are a great resource.

Regards, Jerry

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com