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Forum topic by Dan_123 posted 10-02-2016 01:38 PM 371 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan_123

10 posts in 88 days


10-02-2016 01:38 PM

Hi all. This isn’t really “woodworking” but I’m sure somebody here will have plenty of experience with my situation. It has to do with framing out a wall. I am renovating my old attached garage and I have to extend some of the wall studs out farther. The existing wall framing sits on a 4’ high cinder block wall but is set back several inches from the front of the block. I want to add new doug fir studs ripped down to close to 2×2 or 2×3 so that my 1/2” sheetrock will be flush with the cinder block. This will alllow me to hide some new, large electrical conduit that is bolted to the existing studs.

What is the correct way to attach the new studs to the old ones? It seems like toe-in nails won’t be strong enough. Do I just get some big-a## nails and drive them through? Should I glue them in addition to nailing?

Nothing here is load bearing, but might need to support some shelving in the future.

Thanks for any clue.

Dan


17 replies so far

View Halc's profile

Halc

125 posts in 1062 days


#1 posted 10-02-2016 01:52 PM

I would put a bead of construction adhesive on the edge of the old studs, then attach the 2×2s with lag bolts straight through the edges into the studs. Pre-drill to avoid splitting, recess the head of the bolt, use a washer with each bolt.

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Dan_123

10 posts in 88 days


#2 posted 10-02-2016 02:09 PM

Hmm. Sounds time consuming but probably would make for a strong bond. If I have 4’ stud lengths then sounds like 1 on each end and 1 in the middle would do? What diameter bolts would you use, roughly? I would have to do this with approximately 10 studs.

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Mark

819 posts in 1434 days


#3 posted 10-02-2016 02:18 PM

Dan. Your existing studs run vertical. Nail (or screw) your new studs on the horizontal.

-- Mark

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Halc

125 posts in 1062 days


#4 posted 10-02-2016 02:23 PM

I think 1/4” lags would be fine as long as they go into the old studs about 2”. You’ll probably be hanging things on this wall in the future, so I don’t think you will regret putting some extra time into the project now. Good luck with it.

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BurlyBob

3644 posts in 1725 days


#5 posted 10-02-2016 02:24 PM

I like Marks idea. Also consider adding extra horizontals where you plan on hanging things, cabinets, shelves and such. Deck screws are quick fast and easy.

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HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#6 posted 10-02-2016 04:38 PM

I think the lag bolts would be overkill. I’d use something like these three inch deck screws

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

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Dan_123

10 posts in 88 days


#7 posted 10-02-2016 04:51 PM

Yeah, maybe horizontal is the way to go. I could put two screws into each stud for an 8’ length. Should be pretty strong I guess. I still have to measure the distance, but it could be over 2.5” worth of lumber to screw through just to get to the old stud (maybe even 3”). I don’t think a 3” screw will do the trick unless I do some serious countersinking.

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Shawn Masterson

1297 posts in 1408 days


#8 posted 10-02-2016 05:16 PM

1/4” lags are insanely overkill. me personally If I were adding 2” to the face of the stud I would pin them on with existing stud with a framing nailer(10dd nails) and 2 3” screws at the top(pre drilled as not to split). if you were still concerned you could use timber tech screws. http://www.lowes.com/pd/FastenMaster-50-Count-4-1-2-in-Structural-Wood-Screws/3446730?cm_mmc=SCE_PLA-_-ToolsAndHardware-_-NailsAndScrews-_-3446730:FastenMaster&CAWELAID=&kpid=3446730&CAGPSPN=pla&store_code=2593&k_clickID=1c6c550e-ae7e-4ea2-8c23-d5f05ef4268c

View Matt Hegedus's profile

Matt Hegedus

78 posts in 252 days


#9 posted 10-02-2016 07:04 PM

Screws, brother.

I’ve done a lot of this fixing old houses, padding out walls, correcting slanted studs in 100 yr old twisted houses, etc.

Charge your impact, Drill pilot holes in the new studs (at the top of each), hold in place, and run some quality 3” torx head deck screws into both studs,

Once the top is attached, swing the bottom to match the existing studs and do the same… Pilot hole, then run them home…

You can get a helping hand with some Irwin Quick grips.

That’s all it will take. I promise.

-- From Pittsburgh, PA

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Dan_123

10 posts in 88 days


#10 posted 10-03-2016 01:29 AM

Matt – for a 4’ length do you recommend 1 screw each top, middle, bottom, or just keep putting screws in until it feels tight? Also, how deep does the screw need to penetrate the old stud to be good? The new stud might be as much as 3” all by itself.

Thanks,
Dan

View Matt Hegedus's profile

Matt Hegedus

78 posts in 252 days


#11 posted 10-03-2016 11:42 AM

Dan,

I’d put 3 or 4 screws into a 4’ length. Depth needs to be at least an inch I’d say… More if you can get it. For 3” thick studs, you can either countersink them an inch or so, or depending on the size of the pilot hole (and power of your impact driver), run them home an inch or so…. Which means push and hold in the trigger. I’d definitely use torx head screws though… You just can’t get good bite with a Phillips head bit.

On everything else use your best judgement… You’ll get a feel for how to do it as you do it.

Matt

-- From Pittsburgh, PA

View PaulHWood's profile

PaulHWood

333 posts in 1712 days


#12 posted 10-03-2016 12:35 PM

Horizontal, would give you continuous hanging points

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

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canadianchips

2341 posts in 2456 days


#13 posted 10-03-2016 01:25 PM

Not sure how straight your walls are now ?
Pictures would be helpful.
I would go horizontal that might allow you to shim in certain studs and keep your finished framing wall straight and plumb.
Rule of thumb for fasteners. Material 1/3 thickness, fasteners 2/3. eg. 3/4” board use 2-1/2” nail
Screws are similar.
We can buy 4”, 5” or 6” plated screws here.”Robertson head….square drive”..Yes Im canadian !
using 2×2 minimum 4” screw.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Dan_123

10 posts in 88 days


#14 posted 10-06-2016 10:33 PM

I went ahead and took a pic. I should say right off that the studs are dead on plumb vertical. This house was built in the late 50’s and by all accounts they did a good job. The wall used to take a jog in at the top of the cinder block and then was sheetrock above that. For the other wall in the garage (not pictured) that will remain the same. At the same time that I was renovating the garage, I had a whole house generator installed. The conduit up against the studs is the main electrical line going from the breaker panel to the generator. This is the main reason I need to bump out the wall (although I might have done it anyway for other reasons). I have determined that an additional 2.75” is needed to cover the conduit with sheetrock and still remain about vertical with the cinder block. I’m going to box in the duct. (Also, for anybody wondering, there is just a skim coat of insulation spray on this section of wall since this is just an exterior wall…but that’s another story).

So for the guys recommending the deck screws is it realistic to use 4” screws? I suppose I could insert cross bracing between each of the studs to shore up the new vertical studs, if necessary. If I go horizontal with the new studs, I still kind of have the same problem with the thickness of the studs, no?

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Dan_123

10 posts in 88 days


#15 posted 10-06-2016 10:36 PM


Rule of thumb for fasteners. Material 1/3 thickness, fasteners 2/3. eg. 3/4” board use 2-1/2” nail


Wouldn’t that be 3/4” board and 1-1/2” nail?

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