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cutting board/butcher block question

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Forum topic by dakremer posted 06-25-2010 01:09 AM 1550 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dakremer

2583 posts in 2558 days


06-25-2010 01:09 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting board help

So i have my newly made table saw sled, and my digital gauge to get the blade at exactly 90 with the sled. I can now make perfectly square and multiple cuts!! (yay!!) I was fooling around making some practice cutting boards but can’t quite get the joints EXACTLY dead on. there is always a gap somewhere. I know you can’t have any gaps with a cutting board or bacteria can get in, etc (am i right?). I was wondering what i’m doing wrong? when I cut something with the table saw, one side of the wood is always frayed (or ripped up) – do i sand those off first? or do I leave it? Cuz if I leave it, the pieces don’t sit tight and snug with each other because those little bits get in the way….Maybe i need a new blade…. any help PLEASE!!! :) :) Thanks

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!


10 replies so far

View Crushgroovin's profile

Crushgroovin

234 posts in 2390 days


#1 posted 06-25-2010 01:15 AM

Yeah man you probably need a higher tpi blade or at least a sharper one. I just bought a two pack of 10” Dewalt Carbide blades at Lowe’s for under $20, one blade is 40 tpi the other is 80 tpi I have used the 80 tpi for mdg & some cutting boards & it works great, no fraying at all.

So hey that’s my thought on itl

-- I wouldn't be so arrogant if you weren't such a moron!

View Nomad62's profile

Nomad62

726 posts in 2425 days


#2 posted 06-25-2010 01:47 AM

I would agree, it sounds like a dull or dirty blade, but it is a table saw; consider cleaning up the surfaces with a plane or scraper before glue-up.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

618 posts in 2831 days


#3 posted 06-25-2010 01:48 AM

Well Start with: Is your sled 90 to the saw, or better yet is the saw parallel to your miter slot….If not when you straighten it your sled will be off. You will need a good crosscut blade that can produce glue line faces. A dialed in table saw is key to more better woodworking. I’m sure someone will go deeper down the rabbit hole with you on the subject.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2583 posts in 2558 days


#4 posted 06-25-2010 01:51 AM

my sled and saw are dialed in! together they make perfect 90 cuts….so thats not the problem..

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

618 posts in 2831 days


#5 posted 06-25-2010 01:59 AM

Sounds like a saw blade problem then Good Luck!

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View sandt38's profile

sandt38

166 posts in 2375 days


#6 posted 06-25-2010 05:00 AM

Could you post images of the boards? Perhaps share with us the blade you are using. It is possible the plate is bending as you feed. Maybe slowing your feed rate might help if this is the case. My assumption is that you are using that walnut in your gloat, and it is pretty hard. A weak plate could be bending and creating this issue.

The blowout, or tearout could be created by a few issues, really. First, a dull blade could be tearing it out. Second, the wrong blade for the project could be causing it. A lesser grade blade with 40 TPI may be too aggressive, and a 60 or 80 TPI might be a better fit. Or a very high quality blade like my favorite the Forrest Woodworker 2. I have, and absolutely love this blade. Cuts so smooth they don’t need sanding. While Forrest recommends the 5 inch silencer plate, I have found that Sears 3 inch plate works perfectly fine for even the hardest woods. Third, you might want to add a zero clearance insert to reduce tearout. The factory throat plate will have too broad of an opening, where a zero clearance will support the workpiece and prevent blowout.

I have found using a good blade makes all the difference in the end. Even with my factory throat plate I don’t experience much tearout, and that which i do incur is almost nil. I see that even with my stock Ridgid combination blade with the zero clearance insert I suffer almost no tear out compared to the stock throatplate.

I highly recommend that you invest in a top notch blade. You have a lot of fine walnut to play with. Your savings on this wood makes affording a world class blade even easier, not to mention a worthwhile investment. As long as you know the motor and sled are all set to a perfect 90 degrees, the only thing that makes sense is the blade.

Good luck, and let us know what you come up with… and please, post some images so we have a better idea of what the problem really is.

-- Got Wood? --- Somewhere along the way the people in Washington forgot that they are there to represent the people, not to rule them.

View TroutGuy's profile

TroutGuy

224 posts in 3178 days


#7 posted 06-25-2010 08:52 AM

sandt38 is on the money. I love my Woodworker II too!

On thing though. The OP mentioned that he is using a sled. Therefore, the table insert is irrelevant. The sled is it’s own zero clearance ‘insert’.

-- There is nothing in the world more dangerous, than a woodworker who knows how to read a micrometer...

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16957 posts in 2655 days


#8 posted 06-25-2010 11:14 AM

When I make my boards I use a 40 tooth on the first cut making it a little over 1/16 over size. Then I go back and re-cut (skim cut) everthing with a 80 tooth blade finding the joints on the 8/4 are alot tighter and there is no burning. 8/4 Purple Heart and Rock maple will gum up a higher tooth blade quickly. Someone here taught me this, but thought I would share. I also soak my blades in Krud Kutter that Home Depot sells. This stuff works amazing and its alot cheaper than other saw blade cleaners. I bought a plastic pie pan at wallmart and leave them in over night. Hope this helps.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View sandt38's profile

sandt38

166 posts in 2375 days


#9 posted 06-25-2010 03:32 PM

Krud Kutter, huh? I have been using the CMT Orange. I will have to look into that. Always looking to save a buck. Thanks Ken.

-- Got Wood? --- Somewhere along the way the people in Washington forgot that they are there to represent the people, not to rule them.

View TroutGuy's profile

TroutGuy

224 posts in 3178 days


#10 posted 06-25-2010 06:33 PM

For blade/bit cleaning, I use Simple Green. I dilute it 4:1 and soak them for about a half an hour, then lightly run a brass wire brush over them. It works great!

-- There is nothing in the world more dangerous, than a woodworker who knows how to read a micrometer...

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