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Smaller Diameter Blades on Saw Stop?

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Forum topic by DanielP posted 09-29-2016 12:50 AM 520 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DanielP

489 posts in 1355 days


09-29-2016 12:50 AM

Hello, I want to run a 6” diameter fret slotting blade in my Saw Stop. Can anyone share a method to accomplish that?

Thanks

-- --- Dan


20 replies so far

View marc_rosen's profile

marc_rosen

79 posts in 2644 days


#1 posted 09-29-2016 01:20 AM

Hi Dan,
From what I’ve read in the manual I don’t think it is possible but I wonder if you were to try to override the safety feature (Bypass Mode) if it would then run. I don’t know if the saw will allow you to go into bypass if it still senses a brake cartridge too far away from a blade.
That’s a question for Sawstop, but they may not tell you it’s possible if it could lead to some type of liability issue.
Let us know if you do try Bypass, regardless of its result. Marc

-- Windsurfing, Woodworking, Weaving, and Woodducks. "Most woodworkers are usually boring holes"

View soapmaker's profile

soapmaker

47 posts in 1144 days


#2 posted 09-29-2016 01:39 AM

From my use I would have to say that is not possible. Even with the override the blade has to be the correct size, a 10 inch for the standard cartridge and an 8 inch for the dado cartridge. I would like the ability to do this but it is outside of its abilities, short of altering something in a way that would void warranties and such. Is there no fret slotter in an 8 inch?

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3206 days


#3 posted 09-29-2016 01:39 AM

put the blade in it and see if it runs.

everything else is guessing – - the brake isn’t going to be triggered, but like marc said, the bypass is likely necessary for it to override the checks it does on power-up

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View DanielP's profile

DanielP

489 posts in 1355 days


#4 posted 09-29-2016 02:00 AM

Marc and Soapmaker, I know there are guys who have figured out workarounds, I just was wondering if they did it with minimal disruption to the saws integrity. After reading the manua I also think that it can’t be done under standard procedures. But as DrDirt suggests I’ll give it a shot to see for myself.

I ordered the fret slot blade from StewMac without realizing it was only 6”.

-- --- Dan

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#5 posted 09-29-2016 10:55 AM

I don’t see how you could do it, even on bypass it has to sense the blade. I imagine the “workarounds” to which you refer have something near the cartridge to make the saw think all is good. That same something could get caught or come loose or cause some other problem; overall sounds like a bad plan.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1573 days


#6 posted 09-29-2016 11:46 AM

It can be done! No bypass needed… I figured this out about 3 years ago.

I run 7-1/4” 1/16” kerf blades by using a shop-made 1/8” thick aluminum “liner” mounted to the inside face of the dado insert. The liner is held in place with aluminum #8 FH screws that install into holes drilled and tapped in the brake shoe. I can remove two screws and go back to 8” dados in seconds. It’s not coming off on it’s own…

I use aluminum screws thinking steel might not allow the blade to properly cut the brake during a firing. Screws in general, over tape, hot glue, etc… carry conductivity out to new face to allow the machine to pass POST. The blades I’m typically using are 60T Diablo circular saw blades, for slicing bandings and veneers, as well as narrow grooves.

With a thicker insert, you may be able to get to your size blade. If you’re careful during design, you can come up with an insert that will let you install it with little to no gap adjustment. An easy source of aluminum screws are hobby shops that carry lots of r/c car stuff. The aluminum came from a big box home center.

This technique is not endorsed by SawStop, and I’m sure it would void the cartridge warranty, if not the entire saw warranty.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1816 days


#7 posted 09-29-2016 11:59 AM

oggie, how about a picture, that would be nice for dummies like me. :)

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View DanielP's profile

DanielP

489 posts in 1355 days


#8 posted 09-29-2016 12:39 PM

Oggie, Thanks for sharing. I am in Timberwolfs’ camp though, a picture would be really helpful. Questions like; do you remove the tape that is adhered to the cartridge etc. I could buy a mini table saw for about the price of a cartridge if I was to try it and screw up a brake cartridge. (or two or three)

Fred, thanks for your response.

-- --- Dan

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1573 days


#9 posted 09-29-2016 06:20 PM

Here it is…

By viewing these photos you accept all responsibility for any damage to your machine, or personal injury, resulting from modifying your equipment. I make no claims as to the safety of this modification, or it’s suitability for your skill set, experience level, or specific machine. You use this information at your own risk.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1816 days


#10 posted 09-29-2016 07:41 PM

Thanks oggie, nice pictures and very needed, well stated, disclaimer. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1573 days


#11 posted 09-29-2016 07:48 PM

All that said, I’ll bet the very first commercially available woodworking machine was modded 60 minutes after it was purchased. ;^)

Just like motorsport being born the moment the second car came into existence…

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4224 posts in 1662 days


#12 posted 09-29-2016 07:59 PM

Save yourself the hassle and find a dirt cheap little used portable universal screamer saw on CL for $20-$30 or so – and dedicate it to cutting your fret slots.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3938 posts in 1957 days


#13 posted 09-29-2016 08:25 PM

While I have several thoughts, I’ll keep them to myself and wish you the best as you try and solve your problem.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1951 posts in 1452 days


#14 posted 09-29-2016 08:45 PM

Well…I have several thoughts…some not good. I would be extremely careful. If the brake is set off and the brake slams into a thin blade, I fear you could have shards of metal flying.

I would not do it but to each their own and Good Luck.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1212 posts in 1573 days


#15 posted 09-30-2016 11:04 AM

Anyone who has doubts should clearly not use this information. A few clarifying details though…

This is not a mod for general, everyday use. It is to accomplish a specific set of tasks with a skilled operator.

- When I’m using the circular saw blade, there is a fresh sheet of 3/4” MDF Mag Switched to the saw table, with a zero clearance slot cut fresh at the start of the session. I’m cutting 1/16” wide strips of material from stock less than 1/2” thick, more often 1/4”, so a sloppy kerf would ruin the work.

- My strips are cut between the blade and fence with a spot-made hooked MDF push strip. The device pushes both sides of the cut clear to the back, where an air nozzle with a about a 20 PSI flow blows the cut off to the right.

- I use an Excalibur overarm guard. The push rig slides right under it, across the MDF. Yet another reason why splitter mounted guards stink.

A 1/16” slot in a table sheet that weighs ~ 20 pounds without the Mag Switches holding them down, a purpose-made push device, an off cut light enough to be puffed away, and a proven and industry respected guard… With this in mind, the chance of anything inside the saw getting outside the saw or anywhere near the operator is low enough that I’m perfectly comfortable.

The OP is needing to cut fret slots. In other words, accurate, shallow, thin kerfs… A simple sled to carry the work will accomplish many of the safety enhancements added by my extra parts.

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