LumberJocks

Gun case door help needed

  • Advertise with us

« back to Joinery forum

Forum topic by TechTeacher04 posted 09-28-2016 03:36 PM 372 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

326 posts in 998 days


09-28-2016 03:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tip

I have designed a single door gun cabinet to display a Hawken Flintlock Rifle he built and shot at a Bicentennial Celebration. For security we have chosen Lexan as opposed to temptered glass and to help lighten the door.

My question is what is the best way to attach the lexan to the door? I am using solid hard maple for the construction. I am used to making captive panel through cope and stick or tongue and grove joinery. I plan to spray pre-cat lacquer on it, but am concerned about masking off the lexan. This is my first “glass” door, I have seen one some cabinets a cleat is used to hold in the panel of glass, however I am concerned about the security of this being contingent on the fasteners.


10 replies so far

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

818 posts in 366 days


#1 posted 09-28-2016 03:47 PM

It’s either captive or non captive.
You can make it non captive and glue the retaining strips in after finishing the door. Don’t finish the area you will be gluing to.
Or make it captive and leave the masking on then razor blade the masking off after finishing the door, this will leave the thin strip of masking inside the frame though.
I would do the retaining strips after finishing.
One word of thought, If I wanted the gun I would tear the door right off the cabinet, your not going to stop somebody that really wants it no matter what you do… (insurance)

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

819 posts in 386 days


#2 posted 09-29-2016 12:06 AM

TechTeacher04,

The time may come when the Lexan or whatever else may be used would have to be replaced. A fully captured panel would make replacing the clear panel extremely difficult. Continuous glass stays screwed in place would make both finishing the door and replacing the clear panel much easier. The number, length, and placement of the screws, the thickness of the door, and the glass retaining strips’ material and thickness all work together and could either strengthen or weaken the security of the clear panel.

I am not familiar with physical properties of Lexan, tempered glass, or impact resistant glass as these properties relate breakage. But I am surprised that Lexan is selected. So it is really more impact resistant than tempered or impact resistant glass?

I agree with jbay. A thief willing to risk breaking glass could defeat the door’s locking mechanism or hinges with a pry bar or simply remove the cabinet.

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

326 posts in 998 days


#3 posted 09-29-2016 12:02 PM

After discussions with the glass/plexi/lexan supllier and the customer we chose Lexan (polycarbonate) due to its impact resistance and reduced weight as compared to tempered glass.

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

818 posts in 366 days


#4 posted 09-29-2016 02:57 PM

But I am surprised that Lexan is selected. So it is really more impact resistant than tempered or impact resistant glass?

- JBrow


Lexan (polycarbonate), is pretty much unbreakable.
You can smash it all you want with a hammer and only dent it.

Tech:
They do make a product called “Marguard”, it’s a polycarbonate with a surface coating that makes it more abrasion resistant. Holds up better to light scratching and everyday cleaning. For what your making, it would be a good consideration although like anything it’s more expensive.

Here is another one called MR-10

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#5 posted 09-29-2016 03:34 PM

If it were me I would not lock that thing in and provide no way to ever change because of an “oh crap” moment.

Go ahead and do a cope-n-stick but on the back side use a dado router bit with bearing and do a (normally) 3/8’s dado to take out the back side (after glueup) You will have to 90 those corners because with a chisel as that router bit will leave a round corner. A good sharp chisel will take care of that quick.

Then take some 3/4 stock and do a profile of your choice on the long edges and run 1/4 dado down the center. Rip the pieces of and you have some qtr round strips.

Custom fit those with miters and pin them in with spot glue in middle and close to the edge. If they need replacing they can be popped out. I generally make enough extra to give someone for just in case.

Heres one on a hutch I did. Don’t paint yourself in a corner so to speak :)

https://flic.kr/p/dRBABR

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 310 days


#6 posted 09-29-2016 04:31 PM

I would use quarter round stock to lock the lexan in from behind, mitering the corners and pinning with brass escutcheon pins.

Note: Clean the plastic infrequently with a very clean microfiber cloth. Wipe gently.

If you clean it infrequently it won’t scratch up for a long time.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2533 days


#7 posted 09-29-2016 06:14 PM



If it were me I would not lock that thing in and provide no way to ever change because of an “oh crap” moment.

Go ahead and do a cope-n-stick but on the back side use a dado router bit with bearing and do a (normally) 3/8 s dado to take out the back side (after glueup) You will have to 90 those corners because with a chisel as that router bit will leave a round corner. A good sharp chisel will take care of that quick.

Then take some 3/4 stock and do a profile of your choice on the long edges and run 1/4 dado down the center. Rip the pieces of and you have some qtr round strips.

Custom fit those with miters and pin them in with spot glue in middle and close to the edge. If they need replacing they can be popped out. I generally make enough extra to give someone for just in case.

Heres one on a hutch I did. Don t paint yourself in a corner so to speak :)

https://flic.kr/p/dRBABR

- bonesbr549

Found a door pic where I did the above. A little spacer block attached to base with carpet tape to make life easy.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1114 posts in 2411 days


#8 posted 09-30-2016 01:13 PM

My little brother needed a school project. He chose to build a display case for a generations old 30-30 Winchester. He asked me to help him design it. We came up with just a box that would mount horizontal on the wall. It would have a flip up, glass door, which would be etched with a scene of an elk stepping over a log.

I etched the glass for him and learned the teacher insisted he assemble the box door, then cut it on the saw to give him the door. I pointed out the problem of getting to the glass, if something went wrong.

Of course, the shop teacher knew better than the guy who played with wood and dealt with customers for a living. Sad. He cracked the glass bringing the cabinet home on the school bus.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1646 posts in 1783 days


#9 posted 09-30-2016 01:50 PM

I advise rethinking the captured part. Glass breaks and plastic scratches. Polycarbonate is pretty soft too.

Plus, the moment you install the cabinet some well-meaning person will come along and spray ammonia-based cleaner all over the door and wipe it down with the same cotton cloth used to dust the tv.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 310 days


#10 posted 09-30-2016 02:00 PM



I advise rethinking the captured part. Glass breaks and plastic scratches. Polycarbonate is pretty soft too.

Plus, the moment you install the cabinet some well-meaning person will come along and spray ammonia-based cleaner all over the door and wipe it down with the same cotton cloth used to dust the tv.

- JAAune

I agree. The easy way is how my kitchen cabinets were built. The glass is held in with silicone adhesive (which failed once). I added screw in screen mounting clips: https://doitbest-weblinc.netdna-ssl.com/product_images/storm-and-screen-clip-1/211639/54f6f3d369702d60eb89211f/large_thumb.jpg?c=1472648460

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com