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Forum topic by sweet75 posted 06-23-2010 04:32 AM 3066 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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sweet75

3 posts in 2356 days


06-23-2010 04:32 AM

Hi folks,

I’m a bit of a novice here and need some (hopefully simple) tips.

I have three pieces of reclaimed pine, 54” x 10” and 1/2” thick. I need to make these into a table top but am having problems figuring out how to fasten all three pieces together. Any tips besides making joints?

Thanks. Your help is greatly appreciated!


9 replies so far

View swirt's profile

swirt

2117 posts in 2433 days


#1 posted 06-23-2010 05:20 AM

So many options: Not sure what properties you need the table to have but here goes.

Tongue and Groove
Dowel
Loose Tennon
Spline
ship-lap
sliding dovetail
simple jointed glued edge
breadboard ends

I’m sure I’ve forgotten a bunch. Maybe let the style you are going for be your guide. Will it be rustic, contemporary, ...

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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pmayer

864 posts in 2526 days


#2 posted 06-23-2010 05:31 AM

Sounds like your preference would be something simple, so my suggestion is to use a jointed glued edge. To do this, you need to get a good square and straight edge. If you have a good table saw, and equally importantly a good blade, get the blade square to the table top and carefully rip the boards using smooth, steady pressure. Then, after they are ripped, hold the boards together at the joint. If the joint is gap free, or the gaps are so minor you can easily squeeze them out with hand pressure go ahead and liberally apply wood glue and clamp. If you can’t get a good gap free joint, you can try a router with straight bit and a straight edge guide if you have these things. If you don’t have these, or are not confident in doing this, rip the boards as straight as you can and find someone with a jointer to run the boards through for you. It will only take a minute or two to get a perfect edge on all of your boards with a jointer.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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Gregn

1642 posts in 2444 days


#3 posted 06-23-2010 05:31 AM

I would be careful of gluing wide boards together due to warping. If it were me I would rip to narrower widths and alternate the growth rings and edge glue the joints. At a 1/2” thickness this top is going to need some support as well.
One of the shelves I made for my wife made of pine warped, and I wished I’d ripped them and alternated the growth rings. It is 48”x11”x1/2” board. I’ve seen pine do some weird things even barn wood.

-- I don't make mistakes, I have great learning lessons, Greg

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sweet75

3 posts in 2356 days


#4 posted 06-23-2010 05:42 AM

Thanks for all of the input. Is it really possible/realistic to dowel these boards together? At 1/2” thick it seems kinda thin.

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

864 posts in 2526 days


#5 posted 06-23-2010 05:50 AM

It is unnecessary. If you get good, clean mating surfaces, the glue joint will be adequately strong and no mechanical fasteners will be necessary.

Greg makes a good point about some additional support for a top that thin. Be careful not to bind the wood across the grain, however. You will need to allow a table that wide to expand and contract a fair amount.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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swirt

2117 posts in 2433 days


#6 posted 06-23-2010 05:53 AM

Dowel would not be the best solution at that thickness. The dowel really isn’t for strength though. The glue along the edge provides that. The dowel is mainly to help align the surfaces so the face sides line up well (same as using buiscuits).

Did the dimensions change … I could have swarn they were bigger when I first responded? Sliding dovetail is pretty much out of the running too at that thickness.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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sweet75

3 posts in 2356 days


#7 posted 06-23-2010 06:05 AM

No, the dimensions are the same.

Thanks again for all of your help. I figure I will glue the mated edges. I’m also thinking about building a frame or box to support top and give it extra strength. This would also give me an added edge to attach the brushed nickel legs.

Any preferred glue type out there or does it not really matter?

View childress's profile

childress

841 posts in 3003 days


#8 posted 06-23-2010 07:03 AM

Any yellow glue would be fine, like titebond II or III. The MOST IMPORTANT thing is to joint the surface being glued the day of glue up. If you just glue the pieces together and it’s been a long time since the glue edges have been milled (reclaimed,right?), the glue joint will eventually give…

-- Childress Woodworks

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1984 posts in 2925 days


#9 posted 06-23-2010 04:29 PM

Sounds like these LJers got you on the right track. Glue will be stronger than the wood around it. Elongating the fastener holes in the apron should allow for wood movement. There could be a problem with fastener pull out in a surface that thin. You man want to glue mounting blocks onto key areas of the table top underside to allow fasteners a place to grab and enough material to hold. Watch the cross grain binding or it will split.
Good luck, BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

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