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bowl finishing help?

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Forum topic by haskins posted 09-27-2016 03:40 PM 204 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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haskins

130 posts in 704 days


09-27-2016 03:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip finishing turning sander lathe

i recently turned a pear bowl, nearly dry i think.
I sanded it to 1,00 grit and there was not a scratch to be found.
i then added about 3 coats of danish oil
I waited 2 days
I began to apply poly.
I applied poly by dipping a foam brush in the can and holding it against the bowl as it turned very slowly, i then continued to let it turn for a couple minutes in order to avoid drips.
after about 3 coats i noticed that i had let the inside turn too slow when finishing due to an undesired spiral effect
and some perfectly horizontal lines and some more of these lines on the outside, almost looking as though it was scratched.

so my question is.
where did i go wrong. are these scratch-like lines caused from lightly using steel wool between coats?
If i keep coating over it, will it fix it?
does anyone know of some glossy easy-to-apply finishes that i can use in the future.

-- father son woodworks


4 replies so far

View Indytom's profile

Indytom

3 posts in 1177 days


#1 posted 09-27-2016 06:57 PM

Did you sand to 100 grit or 1000 grit? I know that in the past I have done what I thought was a perfect job of sanding, only to find parallel horizontal lines on the bowl after the first coat or two of finish. All I could do was grab the 80 grit and get busy, all the way back to bare wood. Then work my way back up through the grits, being sure not to miss any of them. Wiping the piece with a little paint thinner occasionally really helps to reveal any scratches from a coarser grit that you may not have removed along the way.
Whatever the cause, I am pretty confident that adding more finish is not the answer. I know of very few problems that can be solved by adding more finish, it generally just makes it worse.
I have just recently started using wipe on poly and really like it. I was skeptical at first because it built up slower than I was expecting, but suddenly after just one more coat I had an OMG finish. After hardening for a couple of days, I rubbed it out very lightly with 0000 steel wool to get rid of a couple of stray dust nibs and had a beautiful finish just a half step less than very glossy. The customer loved it.

-- Living large in Central Indiana!

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haskins

130 posts in 704 days


#2 posted 09-27-2016 07:27 PM

thank you i own some wipe on poly but have not been excited with the outcome so i have been reluctant to use it, I was sure that i had sanded properly through every grit, but you seem very experienced, and i will probably just cut my losses and sand through 3 coats of polly and a mirror like finish. I do wonder how many coats of wipe-on poly did it take?, and what grit should i go down to ?, does 150 sound low enough? and i usuallly skip about 100 grit every tine i go up.

and yes that was supposed to say 1000

-- father son woodworks

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#3 posted 09-27-2016 08:02 PM

... i will probably just cut my losses and sand through 3 coats of polly and a mirror like finish. I do wonder how many coats of wipe-on poly did it take?, and what grit should i go down to ?, does 150 sound low enough? and i usuallly skip about 100 grit every tine i go up.
- haskins

No need to sand back down to bare wood – just sand out the scratch and re-apply the poly.

I’ll typically just sand down to 220 (or maybe 320) before applying the wipe-on (make your own – 50/50 mix w/mineral spirits). Initial coats take about 10 minutes to dry to the touch, and I’ll put down 3-6 coats before letting it dry overnight. No sanding needed between coats. Come back the next day and lightly hit it with 400 or 600 and lay down some more coats. To get a high gloss build with wipe-on can take a lot of coats, but it’s darn near foolproof.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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haskins

130 posts in 704 days


#4 posted 09-28-2016 05:10 PM



... i will probably just cut my losses and sand through 3 coats of polly and a mirror like finish. I do wonder how many coats of wipe-on poly did it take?, and what grit should i go down to ?, does 150 sound low enough? and i usuallly skip about 100 grit every tine i go up.
- haskins

No need to sand back down to bare wood – just sand out the scratch and re-apply the poly.

I ll typically just sand down to 220 (or maybe 320) before applying the wipe-on (make your own – 50/50 mix w/mineral spirits). Initial coats take about 10 minutes to dry to the touch, and I ll put down 3-6 coats before letting it dry overnight. No sanding needed between coats. Come back the next day and lightly hit it with 400 or 600 and lay down some more coats. To get a high gloss build with wipe-on can take a lot of coats, but it s darn near foolproof.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I ended up just cutting my loses with the larger bowl because it had warped some and i could tell that sanding wouldnt have gone well. however i put wipe-on poly on a bowl that i had turned a while back and after about 4 coats, there was a nearperfect finish, and it gave it a glossy look without making it look like a plastic film over everything.

-- father son woodworks

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