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Forum topic by redesigningwood posted 09-27-2016 12:31 PM 347 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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redesigningwood

139 posts in 293 days


09-27-2016 12:31 PM

Good morning all,

I purchased a used 4 inch delta planer about a year ago, and have had to contend with an angled cut since. I have to spin the wood after every cut ( when flat-faced) and it sort of stays flat. Just doing one side/edge without turning the wood around results in an angled piece of wood (think wedge).

I just upgraded to a Delta 37-280 6 inch jointer I scored online for $100, and I am having the same issues. I tried to adjust the knives with both jointers, checked with straight edge, etc.

What am I doing wrong? Is it the machine or am I possibly using the planer wrong? Did I not check something I need to?

Any help would be appreciated.

-- Mat


14 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#1 posted 09-27-2016 12:46 PM

It sounds like the blades aren’t set properly (higher on one side than the other). You’ve already checked that, so if your confident that’s not the issue, are the tables both flat and coplanar? If yes then it’s likely an issue of technique.

When I have cupped or twisted boards, I have to be methodical in which side I joint first and where I concentrate the pressure. I personally find it helpful to hit the high edges of the concave face with a hand plane just enough to minimize wobble. Then I joint that side first and apply pressure on the outfeed side at the center of the board taking light passes until I get flats cleaned up on both edges.

The fact that spinning the board helps the issue leads me to believe that you’re concentrating your pressure on one side consistently. Spinning the board also means that your cutting against the grain half of the time. I’d recommend taking a board that’s already S2S and make a few passes over the jointer with it and see what your results are. It may reveal that you need to adjust where you apply pressure on the outfeed side.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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redesigningwood

139 posts in 293 days


#2 posted 09-27-2016 01:21 PM



It sounds like the blades aren t set properly (higher on one side than the other). You ve already checked that, so if your confident that s not the issue, are the tables both flat and coplanar? If yes then it s likely an issue of technique.

- HokieKen

To be fair I am not confident in either issue (the straightness of the blades, or my technique) and you bring up a point, since this is happening on both machines, it may be me.

I typically use either my hand or a block to hold down the wood at or just in front of the knives, and a home made push block at the back. I guess when I’ll get home I’ll recheck the blades and go from there.

-- Mat

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 941 days


#3 posted 09-27-2016 01:46 PM

If the blades are not parallel to the outfeed table, and you will have big problems. I use a dial indicator on a magnetic base to adjust the blades. You can also use a blade height adjustment jig.

Your technique sounds ok so I think its the blades or the beds. Be careful using push blocks particularly on 3/4 stock you don’t want much downward pressure on the infeed side, mostly push pressure.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View redesigningwood's profile

redesigningwood

139 posts in 293 days


#4 posted 09-27-2016 02:08 PM



If the blades are not parallel to the outfeed table, and you will have big problems. I use a dial indicator on a magnetic base to adjust the blades. You can also use a blade height adjustment jig.

- rwe2156

I don’t have either of those tools :) Any idea how to do it for a “casual” woodworker? lol

-- Mat

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3202 days


#5 posted 09-27-2016 02:16 PM

Try this way to do it simply – -

I would watch the whole thing – but at the 4:10 mark he shows how he tests for a ‘level’ knife with a block of wood

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMVP1JGdvuI

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4852 posts in 2273 days


#6 posted 09-27-2016 03:01 PM

The snapcheck is a great tool for dialing in a jointer. Without it you are just guessing at alignment.

Find it here for an incredible price of $19.95 http://www.chipsfly.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?

You will also need a high quality straightedge and feeler gauges to check for coplanar.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View redesigningwood's profile

redesigningwood

139 posts in 293 days


#7 posted 09-27-2016 03:33 PM



Try this way to do it simply – -

I would watch the whole thing – but at the 4:10 mark he shows how he tests for a level knife with a block of wood

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMVP1JGdvuI

- DrDirt

that’s great, thank you! I am very amateur at fixing / aligning my tools (and not the most patient person on the planet) , and I do not typically have anyone around to show me how to do it the right way so I usually just deal with it. I will try this out when I get home -

-- Mat

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

1131 posts in 172 days


#8 posted 09-27-2016 04:09 PM

that s great, thank you! I am very amateur at fixing / aligning my tools (and not the most patient person on the planet) , and I do not typically have anyone around to show me how to do it the right way so I usually just deal with it. I will try this out when I get home -

- redesigningwood
PATIENCE IS VIRTUE …...it does take some patience setting knives correctly on your jointer but once set perfect it will be your go to tool maybe you could buy a one way ?? good luck and I wish you patience

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#9 posted 09-27-2016 04:24 PM

Yeah, I’m afraid you’re pretty much going to have to be a little patient at least. A jointer is really a pretty simple machine and straightforward to set up. But, it can also be a little tedious depending on your method. It’s one of those machines though, that if not set up properly, will be more of a headache than helpful.

FWIW, I use a dial indicator on a planar gauge to set my knives but the “snapcheck” that Willie showed looks pretty doggone slick. And for $20, if you don’t already have a height gauge or indicator, that is a very worthwhile investment. Looks like it would be good for setting the height on router bits and table saw blades and probably many other shop “chores”.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View rick1955's profile

rick1955

258 posts in 891 days


#10 posted 09-27-2016 05:11 PM

If I understand your description of the problem correctly I believe your outfeed table is slightly higher by a few thousandths than your blades. I’ve been setting up machines professionally for over 30 years. I’ve seen it all.

-- Working smarter with less tools is a true crafts person...

View upinflames's profile

upinflames

209 posts in 1622 days


#11 posted 09-27-2016 05:25 PM

You can adjust on it till the cows come home and it won’t “cure” the “problem”....It’s a jointer, nature of the beast, most folks confuse it with a thickness planer. When jointing a board it start with face jointing, a couple passes unless it’s twisted severely, then edge joint. THEN run run it through the planer, then across the table saw on the opposite side of jointing to get ALL sides parallel and perpendicular. ...So….again …all the adjustments in the world will not fix that particular problem.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2084 days


#12 posted 09-28-2016 04:01 AM

You mentioned you hold the board down ’ in front’ of the cutter head. While you must start out doing that MOST of the force should be applied against the fence and on the the out feed side of the cutter head. I don’t know if the problem or you machine but poor technique will result in poor results.
It is of course imperative the the fence be 90 degrees to the bed. I use artists or drafting triangles.
Good luck.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#13 posted 09-28-2016 12:05 PM



You mentioned you hold the board down in front of the cutter head. While you must start out doing that MOST of the force should be applied against the fence and on the the out feed side of the cutter head. I don t know if the problem or you machine but poor technique will result in poor results.
It is of course imperative the the fence be 90 degrees to the bed. I use artists or drafting triangles.
Good luck.

- jumbojack

I assumed by “in front of the cutterhead” you meant on the outfeed side. If that’s not the case, then by all means, do what jumbojack said.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

131 posts in 345 days


#14 posted 09-28-2016 02:23 PM

If you are getting a wedge shape side to side (across the board’s width) then it’s a blade height issue more than likely. If it’s a lengthwise wedge (a taper along the length) then it’s a table height issue. Outfeed should be same height as the knives. If it’s higher or lower, depending on your technique, you’ll get a taper.

HOWEVER, as upinflames notes, any taper caused by the jointer is removed running the board through a planer to make both faces parallel. So even if one side is tapered, the planer will remove wood on the other face so that the two faces are parallel.

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Any board cut to length has a 50% probability of being too short.

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