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Am I sanding TOO much?

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Forum topic by Raftermonkey posted 06-22-2010 01:15 AM 2457 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2374 days


06-22-2010 01:15 AM

Topic tags/keywords: sanding

Hey guys and gals. I hand carve bowls not using a lathe. I use an angle grinder with a chainsaw disc on it and gouges and chisels. I am pretty new to carving. Using these tools leaves me with a lot of tool marks and A LOT of sanding. I have started using an orbital sander and an electric drill with a sanding disc attachment. I start with 50 grit and graduate up to 220 grit (80 grit and 120 grit in between those). I used to do it all by hand but it would take me a coupla days to get it how I liked it. The problem is, since I have been using the power tools I end up with little scratches that no amount of hand sanding will get out. They are the same diameter as the sanding disc. This happens especially with the drill. I have tried to not bare down as much and take it easy using light passes but I still get the scratches, and they look terrible. Some spots look like I have sanded the color out of the dark grain leaving a really light spot interupting the flow of the darker grain. What do I need to do different? Any and all help is GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks,

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"


16 replies so far

View tyskkvinna's profile

tyskkvinna

1310 posts in 2448 days


#1 posted 06-22-2010 01:19 AM

I recently had this problem and got around it by skipping the rougher grits and only using 120 & 220 and being super careful to not bore not on the edge of my orbital sander, which is a big habit of mine. Maybe that may help?

-- Lis - Michigan - http://www.missmooseart.com - https://www.etsy.com/people/lisbokt

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Tony Strupulis

257 posts in 2585 days


#2 posted 06-22-2010 01:21 AM

After the lancelot disk, use something like a 1/4” shank kutzall carbide sphere in a flex shaft tool or an air powered die grinder. That will take out the big marks left by the lancelot. Then you can go to sandpaper.

-- Tony - http://ravensedgetoolworks.com

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Tony Strupulis

257 posts in 2585 days


#3 posted 06-22-2010 01:23 AM

Some random orbit sanders have different backing pads you can use that are softer than the stock one. That would help with the edge gouging.

-- Tony - http://ravensedgetoolworks.com

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2374 days


#4 posted 06-22-2010 01:29 AM

I would love to skip to 120 then 220 but I don’t think they would come close to getting my tool marks out, haha. My stuff is pretty rough before I start sanding, but Im getting a little better. I’ll try that but those tool marks will prolly start laughing at me and calling me names, haha.

Thanks

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3039 days


#5 posted 06-22-2010 01:29 AM

I think you may be starting with too low of grit to start with and as Lis stated don’t skip over and grits go through them all starting at 60-80 grit then 100.120,150, on up as high as you want. Remember the finer the grit the more it seals of the grain form taking many stains.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Roper

1370 posts in 3175 days


#6 posted 06-22-2010 01:33 AM

Very nice bowls in your profile pic, it might be time to invest in a lathe, lot less sanding.

-- Roper - Master of sawdust- www.roperwoodturning.com

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2374 days


#7 posted 06-22-2010 02:38 AM

Thanks for all the help and suggestions. I will definately give these a shot. My last resort is to go back to completely hand sanding, ugghhh what a chore, but whatever works right?

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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wseand

2754 posts in 2503 days


#8 posted 06-22-2010 05:30 AM

Have you looked at the Kutzall wheels. I have not used them, but they are good for shaping chairs.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Catspaw

236 posts in 3277 days


#9 posted 06-22-2010 02:21 PM

You’re cutting into the wood with your powertools. As was stated, probably with the edges. You’re making alot of work for your sanding. By the time you get to 100 grit, you’re not really removing that much material, you’re only smoothing. The only way you can get rid of the tool marks is to remove material.

Definitely change your cutting technique (i.e. don’t let the edges dig in, softer pad on the orbitl, etc.)

I would suggest using a scraper. They’re easier to modify into the required curves and when sharpened properly can remove alot of material with alot more control. Particularly, in the areas where there are tool marks. After scraping, the amount of sanding could be reduced quite abit.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2374 days


#10 posted 06-23-2010 01:53 AM

Thanks everyone. Ya’ll have been a great help to me. I am going to try the kutzall sphere for the bigger tool marks then start with 80 grit rather than 50, and move up from there. May even start with 100 grit and see how that goes.

Thanks Roper I would love to have a lathe but I would have to sell a lot more bowls to get one. When my gouges and chisels run out of gas I’ll go get one, haha.

Catspaw, What kinda scraper should I be looking for? Please excuse my ignorance. (I only play dumb to get answers so I don’t have to do much research, shhh don’t tell nobody, haha)

Thanks a ton folks, :)

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2374 days


#11 posted 06-27-2010 02:59 AM

Ok, I have narrowed it down to these two tools to help end my sanding woes. The first is the kutzall contour wheel 104x. I think it is a little more for carving, which I don’t mind because my bowls tend to be a little irregular and maybe I could dial them in some. The second is the kutzall sphere 1/4, 1/2, or 3/4 inch. Which one of these fine tools do ya’ll think I should try? They will be my frontline offense to knock down the tool marks followed by a series of sandpapers starting at 80 grit. First is the contour wheel.

The second is the sphere.

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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hairy

2384 posts in 2994 days


#12 posted 06-27-2010 03:36 AM

Before moving to your next finer grit, wipe with a rag, then hand sand in the direction of the grain. That will remove scratches from power sanding.

Don’t go up in grit more than 50% of your last grit.

Works for me, but I normally hand sand.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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Raftermonkey

560 posts in 2374 days


#13 posted 06-27-2010 02:00 PM

Thanks Hairy, that is very informative. I never new not to go up by more than 50% of my last grit.

-- -Zeke- "I hate to rush off, but I gotta go see a man about a log"

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Catspaw

236 posts in 3277 days


#14 posted 06-27-2010 02:39 PM

Well, there’s all kinds of [furnuture] scrapers in the catalogs. They are flat peices of sheet metal with various shapes (as oppose to just a flat rectangle.) I was thinking of the french curve. Then I make some scrapers too out of those paint scraper things. I usually only do flat stuff. Doing inside curves would require some creative tooling, but, could be done. You can grind the flat edge into a curve pretty easily. Depending on how curvaseous your bowl is, you change the profile of the scrape depending on your angle of attack. Straight = curve, pull with handle at an angle = more curve.

-- arborial reconfiguration specialist

View Kathy's profile

Kathy

210 posts in 2383 days


#15 posted 06-27-2010 02:44 PM

I was told that I needed to make sure I had wiped down the piece of any grit that was left behind by the last sanding. That seems to have made a difference for me.

-- curious woodworker

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