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220V wiring personal question

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Forum topic by Scandell posted 09-26-2016 01:35 PM 451 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Scandell

2 posts in 73 days


09-26-2016 01:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: 220v electrical conduit power

Long time reader, first time poster
We just moved into a new home last fall, and
I want to bring in 220v into my wood shop.

My shop is in the third bay of my garage.
My main electrical breakers are downstairs in the basement of our long skinny home…far from the garage.
However,
On the exterior wall of my wood shop, there is a 220v line that breaks off from our power meter. It has its own single breaker out there and the line of
Conduit runs along our home to our back patio. We had a hot tub there that was powered by this 220 line. But we got rid of it.

My questions are:

How difficult would it be to split that line after the exterior single breaker? Is this “ok” to do? Can I just drill a hole through the brick or stem wall and run a line through and add some 220 outlets on the wall of my shop? How many outlets can I run? Is this safe? Is this something I can do? I am quite handy, and work a lot with robotics and electrical concepts.

Any help you can offer would be great.

-Stephen


10 replies so far

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dbray45

3187 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 09-26-2016 01:42 PM

My recommendation – if you are not experienced in running electrical circuits – don’t, especially through brick walls and garage walls. Bring an electrician in to do the work. Garages are technically fire walls and as a result, fire codes need to be maintained. This may require conduit or other kinds of shielding (not sure in your area).

-- David in Damascus, MD

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WhyMe

615 posts in 1026 days


#2 posted 09-26-2016 02:08 PM

What you are asking is very doable. Basically you can run conduit through the exterior wall to the inside and run surface mounted conduit to the location of where you want the outlet(s). Be aware that your local/state electrical code may restrict having multiple outlets on a single circuit if it is greater than 20 amps.

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brtech

904 posts in 2388 days


#3 posted 09-26-2016 02:11 PM

Not sure of the “fire wall” issues, but running a line of 220 outlets downstream of a breaker is not a problem.
The number of outlets isn’t really the issue. The issue is what is the load on each outlet, and how often will you have more than one tool running at the same time? It’s common to have a string of outlets on a single breaker because you don’t use them all at full load. What you want to pay attention to is the max load. That would typically be a DC (if your DC is 220V) and your biggest motor, which is often your TS, but could be something else. You rarely have more than one tool (plus the DC) running at the same time, but if you do, figure out the max load and the breaker has to be bigger than that, and the wire gauge has to be rated at that load.

If you run the electric on the surface, you need conduit. If you put it in the wall, you don’t. There really isn’t much difference between running 110 to a string of outlets and 220 to a string of outlets other than the extra conductor and the different outlets. Of course, there are a couple of choices for 220V outlets and you either have to match what came with the tool or standardize on one style and replace the plugs on the tools that don’t match what you standardized on. As with 110, be very careful to ground properly and keep the neutral wire on the neutral contact. Household 220 has two “hots” and they are interchangeable.

You can also run the 220V line into a small subpanel in your garage and then put a “home run” to each tool from there. If all you are doing with that circuit is powering your 220 tools, then a line of outlets is just fine.

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Fred Hargis

3945 posts in 1958 days


#4 posted 09-26-2016 03:33 PM

You left out quite a few needed details, but with what was described (and as opined above) it can be done. But you need to consider what governance you have to deal with on electrical issues. Daisy chaining 240V outlets isn’t a problem (20 amps or less) unless you have local rules with which to contend.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Roy Turbett

53 posts in 3045 days


#5 posted 09-27-2016 01:08 AM

I installed 220 outlets every 12 feet on the walls of my shop because I didn’t want to be restricted on where to put my tools. I ran 10/3 wire and ended up with four 30 amp circuits; one in the north wall, one in the south wall, one in the floor for the table saw, and one for the air compressor. Passed inspection without a hitch.

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woodbutcherbynight

2440 posts in 1874 days


#6 posted 09-27-2016 01:47 AM

Have a electrical contractor come out an do a assessment, an investment compared to guessing. They will give you a drawing of what they propose and you can use that to decide if this is something you can do, or should let someone who knows do. As others have posted local codes vary and onsite assessments take everything into account when coming up with a workable solution. While cost is always a issue do error on the side of caution. Sure you may only have one or two tools that use 220 svc today, but shops grow and having to upgrade this later is a pain in the butt. My friend had a new line and meter installed to his shop and years later he was glad to have paid the money then verses now. All of his heavy equipment is 220 and he has more than enough power in the 200 amp svc they put in. Now paying the bill, well it is not MY bill… LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#7 posted 09-27-2016 02:34 PM

I have reached a point in my life where all but the simplest things I have an electrician do it. Luckily, I know a boy who moonlights and gives me good prices.

But this is so simple I say go for it – what WhyMe ^^ said.

Also, daisy chaining for machines up to 3 HP isn’t an issue unless you’re a commercial shop with multiple machines running under load.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2532 days


#8 posted 09-27-2016 03:37 PM



I have reached a point in my life where all but the simplest things I have an electrician do it. Luckily, I know a boy who moonlights and gives me good prices.

But this is so simple I say go for it – what WhyMe ^^ said.

Also, daisy chaining for machines up to 3 HP isn t an issue unless you re a commercial shop with multiple machines running under load.

- rwe2156

I have always had 1 circuit for machines and one for DC because never been able to run more that one machine at a time. Only exception I have one dedicated for the SS because of amperage required.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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DirtyMike

461 posts in 367 days


#9 posted 09-27-2016 03:44 PM

I have a very similar setup, And i need to put more power in my shop. Dont try to save money on thinner wire, and dont buy your electrical goods from a blue or orange store. find your local electrical supply.

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WhyMe

615 posts in 1026 days


#10 posted 09-27-2016 05:28 PM



I have a very similar setup, And i need to put more power in my shop. Dont try to save money on thinner wire, and dont buy your electrical goods from a blue or orange store. find your local electrical supply.

- DirtyMike

9 times out of 10, unless you are a electrical contractor with an account at a local electrical supply, you’ll find that the big box home stores are going to be cheaper for the diy’er. At least that’s how it is here locally.

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