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Poor Results from Amana Tool 100T blade in DWS780

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Forum topic by LBH posted 09-25-2016 05:23 PM 1062 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LBH

102 posts in 655 days


09-25-2016 05:23 PM

I am going to help my friend install some WindsorOne base and case for 14 doors an hall, 3 bedrooms….

He’s had a DeWalt DWS780 miter saw for some time but it gets little use. I borrowed it to cut some plywood that I need for small concrete forms. I’m using scrap 3/4” pre-finished maple ply. Anyway… The cuts were terribly frayed. I told Tim a new blade was needed before the B&C job. We decided on an Amana Tool 100 tooth 12” blade. It was priced in a sweet spot between Freud and Forrest and I have had great luck with Amana router bits.

I installed the blade and made two cuts. One on the plywood and on on 5/4 hickory.

I could not believe my eyes! The top edges were terrible. Better than the old Dewalt blade, but totally unacceptable for a $90 finish blade. Strangely, the bottom edge is pretty good. (No zero clearance plate)

Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated.
Luke

Here are the photos.

-- Disclaimer: Author does not warrant the accuracy of the comments in this post including spell'n and frammer. I'm just another Dufus on a forum.


21 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

692 posts in 1263 days


#1 posted 09-25-2016 07:08 PM

I have that blade but only use it for trim work.Crown molding Etc.
For solid wood cross cut I have a Amana 72 tooth.
For dran near perfect miters I use Forrest Chop master.
The one difference is that I have Scms Bosch glide.
So I enter the cut at the corner edge of my stock instead of the face.I don’t know for sure if it makes a difference but it might help.

Aj

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LBH

102 posts in 655 days


#2 posted 09-25-2016 07:42 PM

Hi AJ

Agree. Ordinarily I wouldn’t use it for hardwood. I just grabbed it for a test. That said it should do a great job with the ply. My Festool TS55REQ cuts it amazingly.

I don’t think it’s the blade because the results look a lot like the FeWalt blade.

Cavitation maybe ???

-- Disclaimer: Author does not warrant the accuracy of the comments in this post including spell'n and frammer. I'm just another Dufus on a forum.

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LBH

102 posts in 655 days


#3 posted 09-25-2016 07:45 PM

Just thought about your post. Yes when I cut the case and base the stock will be against the fence. (Not flat)

-- Disclaimer: Author does not warrant the accuracy of the comments in this post including spell'n and frammer. I'm just another Dufus on a forum.

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Aj2

692 posts in 1263 days


#4 posted 09-25-2016 08:07 PM



Hi AJ

Agree. Ordinarily I wouldn t use it for hardwood. I just grabbed it for a test. That said it should do a great job with the ply. My Festool TS55REQ cuts it amazingly.

I don t think it s the blade because the results look a lot like the FeWalt blade.

Cavitation maybe ???

Ive wondered what it is about 12inch blade and they way they cut on miter saws.Theres must be a lot more going on then we realize.It just hurts my head trying to figure it out.Thats probably why i have three different blades now.
Thats a great saw Festool makes some nice tools.

Aj

- LBH

View RogR's profile

RogR

53 posts in 330 days


#5 posted 09-27-2016 06:10 AM

I can’t recall even an inexpensive blade that did not cut well when brand new. I would try some different wood.

Does the back side have a cleaner cut than the front? Often the trick with plywood with thin veneers is simply to cut it backwards – i.e. with the good face down. Either that or score with a sharp knife first and then cut to the score.

View joey502's profile

joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#6 posted 09-27-2016 10:26 AM

I could be wrong but the teeth look like they are designed for use on a sliding saw (it looks like a negative hook tooth). The tooth angle on blades designed for use on a sliding saw do not tend to plunge cut well.

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joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#7 posted 09-27-2016 10:38 AM

I just googled that model and it is a negative hook. That blade on a slider or a different blade with a more agressive (positive angle) tooth would perform a better on a chop style saw.

View LBH's profile

LBH

102 posts in 655 days


#8 posted 09-27-2016 03:20 PM



Does the back side have a cleaner cut than the front? Often the trick with plywood with thin veneers is simply to cut it backwards – i.e. with the good face down. Either that or score with a sharp knife first and then cut to the score.

- RogR

Yes the backside appears cleaner. I am getting better results (on plywood) by not plunging all the way down before gliding.

The other thing is this is the Chinese 3/4” pre-finished birch. I always by domestic. I have the plywood deliver, when it arrived I saw it was imported. I looked at the invoice and the counter man indeed charged me for import. I thought I’d give it a try. It’s de-laminating is some areas. That might explain the poor results.

-- Disclaimer: Author does not warrant the accuracy of the comments in this post including spell'n and frammer. I'm just another Dufus on a forum.

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LBH

102 posts in 655 days


#9 posted 09-27-2016 03:23 PM


I just googled that model and it is a negative hook. That blade on a slider or a different blade with a more agressive (positive angle) tooth would perform a better on a chop style saw.

- joey502


Joey,
Thank you very much for researching the blade. A) I have no idea what a negative hook does B) I’ve never heard of it.

So not only do I find out what may be going on, but I learn something too.
I truly appreciate the time you took. A true Lumberjock.
Luke

-- Disclaimer: Author does not warrant the accuracy of the comments in this post including spell'n and frammer. I'm just another Dufus on a forum.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

461 posts in 367 days


#10 posted 09-27-2016 03:38 PM

A negative hook blade is meant to be dragged through the wood as opposed to chopped down or pushed. They are a must for radial arm saws and sliding miters. I wouldn’t think that it would give you such lackluster results though.

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joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#11 posted 09-27-2016 04:45 PM

If you google “sliding compound saw blade” the second or third site is a rockler article called saw blade 101. It has a lot of info regarding blade types and tooth configurations.

I have a 12” sliding saw with a negative hook angle blade on it. If i pull the saw out, drop it down and the push the blade into the piece it cuts like butter. If the blade is pushed back and plunged into the work piece the cutting action is terrible.

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joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#12 posted 09-27-2016 04:47 PM

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joey502

487 posts in 983 days


#13 posted 09-27-2016 04:52 PM

My apologies. I did not realize that model dewalt was a slider, that blade is fine for that saw.

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DirtyMike

461 posts in 367 days


#14 posted 09-27-2016 05:20 PM

Joey, are negative hooked blades not to be pulled through the cut rather than pushed?

View LBH's profile

LBH

102 posts in 655 days


#15 posted 09-27-2016 05:54 PM

I’m going to be installing WindsorOne, S4SSE, base and case. Do I cut it flat or upright against the fence.

I can check a Gary Katz video but I thought I’d ask since this thread is going and the blade will be a factor.

Thanks

Luke

-- Disclaimer: Author does not warrant the accuracy of the comments in this post including spell'n and frammer. I'm just another Dufus on a forum.

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