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A Short Trip Down the SW Coast of Norway

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Forum topic by stefang posted 06-21-2010 08:44 PM 1427 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stefang

13270 posts in 2021 days


06-21-2010 08:44 PM

My wife and I took a 1 hour drive down the coast today from where we live in Kleppe (Stavanger area) south down to Egersund, which is still a very busy seaport and in fact is the largest in Norway in terms of fish hauls landed in their harbor. I’ve found a few interesting historical facts about the city which I will include above the photos. But first things first. The general region is called ‘Jaeren’ which is Norways largest agricultural area producing dairy, vegetables, sheep (lamb and wool), pigs, chickens, grains, and beef. Of course we also have lots of oil/gas being produced by offshore platforms out in the North Sea. The oil is the big cornerstone industry that has brought much prosperity to Norway. People don’t get anything for nothing here though, and they still have to work for a living, except for myself of course, since I’m retired. Lol.

We stopped along the road just to give you a view of the rocky North Sea coastline and I was also able to snap a picture of the Denmark ferry returning to Stavanger. It is a really huge ship and can take about 400 cars onboard and i think 2500 passengers. It is an overnight journey. They have nice accommodations and great restaurants aboard.

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We took this picture of Kvassheim light house and the small fishing boat harbor adjacent to it. The lighthouse is a textbook example of lighthouse restoration, how NOT to do it. Very disappointing. It’s easy to see that a local committee has full control and probably very little money. The 3rd and 4th pics are just to show you the rocky coastline. Many ships have been wrecked in this area during some really ferocious storms.

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The first shot is parallel with the highway. Off to the right is the sea. The line of rocks you see are called “Hitlers Teeth”. They were placed there during WWll by the Germans as tank traps to withstand potential enemy landings from the sea, which is unseen to the right of the pic. These were just rocks, but a little further along are more rows of them made from cement. The 2nd photo is the entrance to a German bunker. there are lots of these along the coast, but not really too noticeable.

My wife was born in 1940 and so remembers the German occupation pretty well. Her family’s home was confiscated by the Germans and they had to relocate. Their rented apartment on top of a two story house was next to the areas grammar school which the German forces used as a prison camp for Russian prisoners. My wife and her family put as much food through the fence to the starving prisoners as they could, though they had little themselves. They were constantly being searched by the Germans holding flashlights in the middle of the night. A bad memory for my wife.

The prisoners were able to get small pieces of wood from rubble in the camp and they somehow made small animals out of them. They traded these with the children for bits of food. My wife got some, but here mother made her throw them away because so many of the prisoners had TB and she was worried it could be infectious. The most tragic thing is that almost all of these prisoners were stamped as traitors by the Russians because they had surrendered to the Germans. After being freed in Norway and being returned to Russia, most were either executed or sent to Siberia from where they never returned.

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Here is a not so good photo of what the general terrain looks like as we get a little closer to Egersund. Unfortunately The were repaving the road where I could have gotten some great photos. The smooth rocky terrain was caused by glaciers grinding over them during the last ice age.

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According to my MIL this mountain of white ‘whatever it is’ is used in toothpaste. I haven’t a clue. Maybe a geologist out there knows? I just included it to show you that the white cliffs of dover have nothing over us!

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Two photos of the Tengs river. This is the place you Salmon fishermen want to be in-season. Very little water right now due to lack of rain. The 2nd photo is the river draining out to the sea. Usually a torrent pouring through there. The little houses on the other side are rented to fishermen and there is also a campground there. I think my son fly fishes there sometimes. Personally I like eating it more than catching it.

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Ok, we finally made it to Egersund. The following street scenes are typical for the town. it’s a mix of old and new, but they have protected the older buildings and tried to keep the place quaint without turning the place into a museum. It’s nice to have lunch there and do a little shopping. I don’t know the age of the various buildings pictured here, but I’m sure some are at least 150 years old.

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Just a reminder that although Egersund is a port town, agriculture is still very important for the local economy.

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Now a stroll down to the harbor. The first few pics are Egersund church. Originally St. Maria church built in 1292, but demolished to build the one you see here in 1623. I had hoped to take you inside, but it was locked up. There is a very old model ship hanging from the ceiling in there, and the pews are painted with the names of the families who paid to have them reserved for themselves. they are all rose painted from way back when. Sorry I couldn’t get in to show it to you. The next photos are from the different sides and the last one is the really unusual and very old front doors.

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An old boat, 1930s? A newer model viking ship aka coast guard, some older restored warehouses along the quay and finally the yacht harbor. Not a wooden boat in site. Horrors! Maybe next time.

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Time to get out of town and head back home. An anchor to weigh up the pig statue. This is a real anchor and it has had a lot of rust removed. I thought the coopered top part which has been restored was interesting.

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This is where the aforementioned river Tengs emptys into. this is salt water and part of the sea. It’s not connected with the main harbor though. The houses pictured across the water are summer homes and you have to take a boat from where I’m taking the photos to get there.

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This is just a shot on the road home using the inland route. There are a lot of lakes like this along the route and farms too. The lakes all have trout in them. It’s actually like this for many miles.

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I’m not all to happy with these photos, but my wife and grandson were with and I think all the starting and stopping got a little on their nerves, so I didn’t have time to obsess on the shots and the locations. In spite of that I hope it gives you a small idea of what of Norway is like from my personal viewpoint, and I hope you enjoyed it.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.


34 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112299 posts in 2264 days


#1 posted 06-21-2010 09:03 PM

Wow Mike
What a wonderful tour and great photos a trim I’ll never be able to make . I love the whole thing this well serve as my vaction this year .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4400 posts in 1723 days


#2 posted 06-21-2010 09:13 PM

Some good pictures there, Mike. Another place I’ve seen. Albeit though someone else’s eyes and experience. Which is an experience I find very valuable.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1802 days


#3 posted 06-21-2010 09:22 PM

thank´s Mike for this wonderfull tour
just brought a lot of memery´s back to me
have a very niiiiice summer up there

Dennis

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15706 posts in 2905 days


#4 posted 06-21-2010 09:47 PM

Beautiful scenery and nice history lesson.

Thank you, Mike!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Gary's profile

Gary

7361 posts in 2120 days


#5 posted 06-21-2010 09:52 PM

What a great tour…and what beautiful scenes. Never got to go to that part of the world. Uncle Sam liked to keep me in the jungles in the pacific. Pictures from that part of the world always facinate me. Thanks Mike

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View stefang's profile

stefang

13270 posts in 2021 days


#6 posted 06-21-2010 09:52 PM

Thanks all. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

Dave The heavy water facility was at Norsk Hydro’s plant in Rjukan. A very daring piece of work. Pitch dark, dangerous steep mountains, much ice and snow, approach on skis then some extremely risky climbing, getting past German security who thought it impossible that anyone could possibly get in from the mountain side. Destroyed what had to be destroyed, got out without losing a single man. Very capable heroic men.

Gary I spent some time there myself over a 4 year period while in the Navy. Every place has it’s upsides and downsides I guess, but I cope better with cold and rain than hot and humid.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View degoose's profile

degoose

7038 posts in 2041 days


#7 posted 06-21-2010 09:57 PM

Thanks for the heads up Mike… I may have missed this… nice travelogue and pics… thanks again…

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View patron's profile

patron

13102 posts in 2028 days


#8 posted 06-21-2010 10:46 PM

mike ,
thanks for the great tour .
you live in beautiful country .

a favor though please ,
on of those houses across the water had some nice trim on it ,
could you get some closeups ?
if it’s not to much trouble (LOL) !

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View stefang's profile

stefang

13270 posts in 2021 days


#9 posted 06-21-2010 11:14 PM

If you are serious David (which seems not to be the case), I sure can with my telescopic lens. I had it with me, but I didn’t use it as I wanted more of a panorama shot there.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View patron's profile

patron

13102 posts in 2028 days


#10 posted 06-22-2010 12:39 AM

not to worry , mike .
just pulling your leg .

it sure is nice there ,
and you got to get out and about .

thanks for thinking of us ,
great pictures .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1851 days


#11 posted 06-22-2010 01:13 AM

Thanks Mike. This is one place Sherie has on me, for she traveled to Norway on an expedition for her yarn shop years ago (Dale of Norway is the yarn). She still teaches knitting from Dale patterns, although she is mostly into quilting these days. The quilt shop also sells yarn, and talked her into teaching knitting for them. I think she enjoys teaching others, and appears to be good at it. She helps people who knit at the clinic all the time. She gets spread a little thin at times.

Your pictures were great, no apologies accepted. I have a question though. I remember traveling to northern Denmark and stopped for lunch. Not much english spoken there. Everything seemed to be fish on the menu. What should I expect in Egersund? Sherie is not a great fish freak, I am more accepting…...meaning I eat sardines, pickled herring, and anchovies without a thought. Since my heritage is mostly Danish, that came with living. I thought you couldn’t play cribbage on a Sunday afternoon without pickled herring, sardines, blue cheese, sharp cheddar, etc (my Dad and I played a lot of cribbage). Didn’t play much for many years until my trip to the orient and mideast last year on an extended cruise. I thought we were playing the game wrong because the snacks weren’t right…........(-:

When we traveled through Wisconsin, coming home from visiting my grandfather, who emigrated at age 14 from Copenhagen, my Dad would stop at a ‘cheese factory’ out in the country. No signs, no store, Just some concrete buildings. He’d buy big blocks of the best blue cheese, oldest cheddar, limburger(never got into that stuff), and we’d have a stash for months for the cribbage games. For those who don’t know, I grew up in northern Minnesota.

Thanks for the travelogue. I zoomed up my browser and got a good look at your photos.

Having trouble getting much shop time lately. Have two shop projects going, hopefully finish them this weekend, but don’t hold your breath.

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1851 days


#12 posted 06-22-2010 01:21 AM

By the way, just looking at the water scenes, reminds me of northern Minnesota. Big glacial lakes up there. Similar terrain to the area you photographed. No mountains of course, but lots of hills and long rock shored lakes. Although the ocean scenes could have been from Lake Superior, just 60 miles from where I was raised. Lots of Scandinavian folk up there, also quite a few Finnish in northern Minnesota.

Thanks again for the effort, most enjoyable.

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1851 days


#13 posted 06-22-2010 01:27 AM

DaveR

Haven’t tasted limburger for a long time, my wife wouldn’t come within a stones throw of the stuff. Probably now, it would seem different. You were in Madison as I recall, did you ever go out to Paoli. Great market there.

You should be able to find that stuff down near Rochester, I would think. But nothing like the old Wisconsin cheese. I don’t know how much you get up north, but all of the water scenes could have come from the big lakes in the Arrowhead country, and Lake Superior, don’t you think? Didn’t you canoe up there?

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13342 posts in 2360 days


#14 posted 06-22-2010 01:34 AM

Mike those are some nice pictures.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1851 days


#15 posted 06-22-2010 02:07 AM

DaveR

When I was in Paoli it was still somewhat rural, but you could see the trend (1970-1973). Would drive out there in my used 1967 BMW 1600 and just fit in with the rest of the Madison crowd on my paltry medical resident’s income…..(-:

I was into the car, not the panache…....(-: (-:

Good memories. Beautiful day here in Anchorage. Clear blue sky except for a contrail or two. Sherie is out working in the flower garden, temperature 68 deg at 1600 hrs, about 19 plus hours of daylight, the rest is dusk. No need for headlights 24 hours a day. Think I’ll go out and take some garden pictures…......and view the planter stands from a week ago, in action. Do a blog followup….....

Thanks Dave…...........

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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