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Forum topic by maxhall posted 09-22-2016 09:06 PM 335 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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maxhall

46 posts in 1664 days


09-22-2016 09:06 PM

Hey guys just picked up this free maple on the side of the road. planning to resaw on my 17 inch band saw eventually, question is should I put anchor seal on the ends prior to sawing

it into dimensional Lumber?


12 replies so far

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

457 posts in 365 days


#1 posted 09-22-2016 09:07 PM

when in doubt seal.

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#2 posted 09-22-2016 09:38 PM

Actually definitely seal it. If you don’t you will lose a few inches off the length, maybe more.

Anchorseal is great, a gallon lasts forever so it’s cheap in the long run. Good find!

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1753 posts in 602 days


#3 posted 09-22-2016 11:22 PM

Definitely seal the ends. I would let it dry before resawing too. If you saw too soon and it dries too fast, you’‘re gonna loose a lot. Seal it up and hide it somewhere you’ll forget about it for a couple years if you really want to get all you can.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View maxhall's profile

maxhall

46 posts in 1664 days


#4 posted 09-22-2016 11:54 PM

If it’s sealed does it matter if it’s stored outside? Running out of garage space over here.

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#5 posted 09-23-2016 02:52 PM

I store mine outside padawan, I don’t have space either.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1883 posts in 1598 days


#6 posted 09-23-2016 03:18 PM

You could resaw then seal. Storing outside might be iffy if not protected from direct/indirect sun light, strong winds, & rain. If just lay a trap over the stack on the ground without air circulation couldand un-stickered might just cook the wood or promote spalting & rot.

-- Bill

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

272 posts in 307 days


#7 posted 09-23-2016 04:11 PM

I am reminded of the ancient cord of wood on the side of my home when I first moved it. It crumbled into powder when you picked it up.

I hired someone to do it because of the rodents living in the pile.

I would try to store it, at the very least, protected from rain.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#8 posted 09-23-2016 04:18 PM

For the record I only store logs outside. Once resawed it goes on the lumber rack stickered and sealed in my garage. I also live in Arizona so we don’t have as many rot or critter issues so the logs outside just dry faster and stay better preserved here. One of the few advantages to being out in the west.

View maxhall's profile

maxhall

46 posts in 1664 days


#9 posted 09-23-2016 06:43 PM

I was going to heed the advice I got and leave it in log form for a 1-2 years before cutting into it. I sealed the ends of the logs and may just put it outside elevated off the ground with some cinderblocks PT 2×4s and a tarp on top.

Turns out its oak not maple, found a few oak leaves stuck to the bark when I was brushing on the anchor seal. A little bummed. Not sure how oak is for turning, but I know maple is really nice. Just purchased my 1st lathe so anxious to start turning.

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maxhall

46 posts in 1664 days


#10 posted 09-23-2016 06:49 PM

Got this thing at auction for $178. Its 8ft long ~1100lbs, and has a transmission attached to the motor for speed changes. Just need to put on a VFD since its 3 phase.

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 202 days


#11 posted 09-23-2016 07:07 PM

Depending on what you plan to turn, I would cut those logs to blanks and rough turn them green. If you are doing bowls, do thick bowls turned green then save them in a paper bag with the shavings to let them dry then final turn in a few months. Spindle stuff can be different but if it’s all for turning and not lumber than I would rough turn it or cut to blanks and seal it after that. From the original post it sounded like you were looking for lumber not turning blanks.

Using found wood for turning and lumber are different beasts. Turning green wood is easier as well but you can turn dry of course.

I’m not a big turner guy but I do turn and I do process wood I find for both lumber and round things.

Just my .02

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1883 posts in 1598 days


#12 posted 09-23-2016 07:34 PM

From reading your first post thought you wanted only deminsional lumber, and that still can happen. If plan on turning some of that wood follow Ki7HY’s advice and think about rough turning some of it.

As a woodturner frist general rule-of-thumb learned to forget and I want you to do the same is, “it takes about one year per inch thickness to air dry wet wood.” While that rule of thumb may apply to some softwoods (conifers), but not all doesn’t mean much to a wood turner. You will often see this myth posted on woodworking message boards and articles online.

I have no idea what species you have there looking at photos but would do some processing now. You will speed up the drying process. If want some boards leave at least 5 or 6 quarter. If want spingle & bowl blanks leave little thicker and longer than will need. Oak an open grain wood will dry fraster than closed grain or dense wood.

Wood Handbook is a great reference:
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/publications/several_pubs.php?grouping_id=100&header_id=p

Good luck with it.

-- Bill

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