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Forum topic by rhybeka posted 1530 days ago 927 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rhybeka

261 posts in 1754 days


1530 days ago

Morning everyone!
I could really use some input on something I’ve been fuddling with for the past hour or so. I broke out my new Wood River block plane (#4) last night, and proceeded to dismantle, hone and sharpen the blade. I put it back together this morning once I finished with the blade, and can’t for the life of me figure out why I can’t get the blade to draw farther up into the plane. I’m sure this is a newbie mistake, but I’ve adjusted/readjusted the frog, et all and would like to keep some of my hair intact. Have I just not hit the right balance of adjustments? I know when I took it out of the box the blade was farther up…but I also know I didn’t adjust anything except the chip breaker when I pulled it apart last night, so the frog didn’t move. I’ve referred to the book I’ve been walking through (Handplane Essentials, Christopher Schwartz), and it appears that it should be something with the frog… for the life of me I just can’t figure what.
side view of blade
front view

PS happy dad’s day to all the dads!

-- aspiring jill of all trades


12 replies so far

View Ingjr's profile

Ingjr

138 posts in 1649 days


#1 posted 1530 days ago

Not sure of the exact plane you’ve got but if it’s a bench plane it’s probably a bevel down plane. Meaning, you’ve got the blade in upside down. The bevel should be facing the bottom of the plane. Block planes usually have bevel-up. You called it a “block plane #4”. If it’s a #4, it’s bevel down. Try that I think that’s the problem.

-- The older I get the faster I was.

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

261 posts in 1754 days


#2 posted 1528 days ago

whoops – my bad – it’s a bench plane :) i should be able to take another look at this tonight – took a few days off to come back at it with fresh eyes…Thanks Ingjr!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View patron's profile

patron

13018 posts in 1974 days


#3 posted 1528 days ago

looks like turn the blade over to me .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View swirt's profile

swirt

1937 posts in 1604 days


#4 posted 1528 days ago

Also the chip breaker is what determines the range of the depth of the blade because it is what the depth tang on the frog locks into. So if you have maxed out the depth adjuster screw and it is still not withdrawn far enough, you need to move the chip breaker farther down the iron.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2281 days


#5 posted 1528 days ago

make sure the blade protrudes from the chip breaker only about 1/32” or so. and maybe more relevant to this case: when you install the blade/chipbreaker into the plane, there are usually ~3 slots in the chipbreaker that the moving mechanism fits, you can use any of those slots which determines the range of advancement the blade can slide in- sounds like in your case it may be on the top most slot – try using the middle or lower one to get the blade to retract all the way in/up

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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rhybeka

261 posts in 1754 days


#6 posted 1528 days ago

thanks guys – that was really a duh moment. I got it where it needed to be – it takes nice shavings :) just that I’m working with red oak and red oak ply I think I’ve got plenty of practicing ahead of me before I attempt my actual work pieces. Starting the piece is tough since I’m working on a workmate. Can any lefties out there give me any advice on how they brace the table? I’m feeling a bit awkward even when I try to step stroke.

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2281 days


#7 posted 1527 days ago

hmm, a workmate isn’t really the best option for hand planing – sorry.

I actually built a heavy workbench when I started working with hand planes – otherwise the planing gets jagged as the pieces move WITH the table. you could try to bolt it down, or add some heavy weights (sand bags/etc) on a lower shelf if the workmate has any, but not sure if the workmate can acocmodate any of those, and even it it will, since it’s supposed to be mobile and foldable (if I’m not mistaken) there would be too many moving parts within the table itself to keep it from being super rigid and solid.

I could be wrong though :)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View rhybeka's profile

rhybeka

261 posts in 1754 days


#8 posted 1527 days ago

agreed that it sucks for planing or doing anything short of maybe a small glue up…but my options are slim. Even the wobbly 2×4 garage table in the garage moves badly – it’s probably as old as my house. It’s too short for me as well – i’m only 5’8 but wow…that’s a drop. Unfortunately I don’t have the time or money right now to build a new bench ( I already want to build one of those new fangled benches :)), So I’m trying to think of something that’s better than the wobbly table or workmate, isn’t going to cost me an arm/leg/eyeball or take a ton of time (yes, I’d also like a genie in a bottle thank you). I’ll get my 6ft tables back on Sunday which would at least be a step up kinda… but I was hoping to have this step done by then. Oh well if it’s not. Rock, meet hard place :) Really understanding why people say you need a workbench to build a workbench. Thanks for the feedback, PurpLev!

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View AaronK's profile

AaronK

1397 posts in 2097 days


#9 posted 1527 days ago

if all you have is a workmate then I’d suggest reinforcing IT and/or clamping it to something more sturdy – like the frame of the building you’re in.

my “bench” is an old student’s desk ($5 at local ReStore) reinforced with 2×4s and raised to a convenient height. not the best, definitely not big enough, but it’s weighty and sturdy enough for hand tool work. It really doesn’t take much to get you 90% of the way there! if all you have is a wobbly table, then just make it not wobbly. 2x stock can be had dirt cheap at the big box, just look for usable culls.

View GregD's profile

GregD

614 posts in 1769 days


#10 posted 1527 days ago

Maybe wedge a length of 2×4 between the corners of the shop wall/floor and Workmate top/side, and then plane toward the wall. Something like that would keep the Workmate from moving forward when you push. I expect you’d also want the Workmate firmly on the floor with no wobble, and you wouldn’t want your work piece to extend beyond the base of the Workmate so you have good vertical support.

-- Greg D.

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rhybeka

261 posts in 1754 days


#11 posted 1527 days ago

good thoughts, guys. I just realized I have a piece of 2×6 x10ish here and some other dimensional lumber just sitting around from when I tore a wall down in the basement. If it wasn’t hovering around 90 in the shade here I’d be more apt to work out in the garage. Not sure I have enough lumber to build a short version of this, but I was going to take stock and see what I might be able to put together. I’ve got some 1×3 and 1×4 pine that was supposed to be used for a chair…might just have to abandon the chair for now :D

-- aspiring jill of all trades

View swirt's profile

swirt

1937 posts in 1604 days


#12 posted 1526 days ago

My bench is built largely of 2×4. It is not perfect by any means, but it holds well for planing. The legs are 4×4 and I put in some diagonal bracing to prevent racking. Too keep the thing from moving aorund the basement floor as I plane, I put my beds or nails in the bottom (left over from a when I was a physics teacher). They add about 150 pounds to the weight of the bench. It doesn’t move. My point is that it doesn’t have to be fancy, just stable … which I don’t think you will get from the workmate unless it is one of the older metal ones that actually have a work platform that you stand on to add your weight to it. Those can work pretty good for planing short items. (they are getting hard to find though.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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