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using a power planer to refinish hardwood floors

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Forum topic by agallant posted 09-22-2016 02:58 AM 387 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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agallant

530 posts in 2347 days


09-22-2016 02:58 AM

Does anyone have thoughts on refinishing hardwood floors with a hand held plainer like the one below? I have a few rooms left to do and the drum sander is too big to get much use out of it. I really don’t want to use a palm and belt sander for the bulk of the work. I was thinking of using a hand held power plainer to do the bulk of the work then finishing with 100 grit belt and palm sander.

Thoughts?

https://www.google.com/shopping/product/8265156252799466625?lsf=seller:8740,store:17534325300182324244&q=hand+held+power+plainer&hl=en&mid=syrjdvt4k%7Cdc_mtid_8903tb925190_pcrid_50645156379_pkw__pmt__product_205509610_slid_&lsft=gclid:CjwKEAjw34i_BRDH9fbylbDJw1gSJAAvIFqUK1cwNOIK5zYFnnbmJz3PuplS4Og-j_4eHV0vngrybRoCRxfw_wcB&prds=oid:9263908494556296634&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiypdm0_aHPAhVJNSYKHc0cB9kQrRIIRg


18 replies so far

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waho6o9

7169 posts in 2037 days


#1 posted 09-22-2016 03:40 AM

If and when you hit a nail it’ll give you less than desirable results.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 163 days


#2 posted 09-22-2016 03:41 AM

Id rent a floor sander.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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shipwright

7165 posts in 2258 days


#3 posted 09-22-2016 03:57 AM

I’ve spent a lot of hours on a power plane and I would not recommend it. It would be very difficult to get a nice surface IMHO. They aren’t a surfacing tool. I would use either a drum or disc sander specifically designed for floors.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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TravisH

452 posts in 1396 days


#4 posted 09-22-2016 03:58 AM

Definitely not an expert on floor refinishing as only done a few over the years. No way I would ever think about doing multiple rooms (or even a room) with a hand held planer and palm/belt sander follow up. I just don’t see it as a viable option.

Rooms in my house are small but still used a rental drum sander. Wasn’t too big by any means and allowed me to get within inches of the walls to finish those areas with some hand held sanders. I spent more on those few inches around the wall than doing the entire floors, driving to get the sander, etc…

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jbay

809 posts in 360 days


#5 posted 09-22-2016 04:07 AM

You’ll tear that floor up.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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BurlyBob

3652 posts in 1726 days


#6 posted 09-22-2016 05:18 AM

Do what JW Malone told you.

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 947 days


#7 posted 09-22-2016 05:22 AM

Sounds like a way to mess things up really quick.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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pmayer

864 posts in 2526 days


#8 posted 09-22-2016 12:29 PM

If the drum sander is too big, just rent one of the edging sanders which look like a huge random orbital sander. That should be fine for a small room. Just be sure to keep it flat; don’t tilt it or you’ll get dips. As everyone else has said, don’t use the planer. :)

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#9 posted 09-22-2016 12:42 PM

Thoughts….how about the Titanic? ;-)

My best advice to you is hire it out to the floor pros. After refinishing a couple floors, I will NEVER ever do it again.

BTW, if you’ve never used one, you can also do a lot of damage with a drum sander (how do I know that?).

Good luck.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View JayT's profile

JayT

4772 posts in 1672 days


#10 posted 09-22-2016 12:54 PM

Totally agree with the others on not using a hand held power planer. A floor sander is the way to go—your back and the floors will thank you. Drum sanders take finish and wood off quickly, but you can damage the floor if not careful. I’ve used them, but have come to prefer the orbital floor sanders with large rectangular pads. They are a bit slower than the drum sanders, but are much easier to control, there is almost no risk of gouging the floor and they get much closer to the walls than a drum sander.

When using a drum sander, I had to follow up with an edger. With the orbital, I didn’t have to edge because it got close enough to the wall that the baseboard covered the little bit the sander didn’t get.

There’s also a type that uses three circular orbiting discs. I’ve heard they are easy to use, as well, but don’t have any experience with them.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Halc's profile

Halc

127 posts in 1063 days


#11 posted 09-22-2016 01:08 PM

Like JayT, I used the vibrating sander on my floor and thought it worked well. I rented it from Home Depot. They do work slowly, so I would start with the coarsest grit you can get. With no experience sanding floors, this was a less scary option than the belt sander would have been for me.

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Hammerthumb

2532 posts in 1436 days


#12 posted 09-22-2016 02:16 PM

I’ve sanded lots of floors as that’s what I did for a living in my younger years. I would go with JayT’s recommendation for someone who does not have experience with floor sanding. The orbital is much slower than a drum sander, but that makes it harder to make mistakes. The Trio head sander is slow also, but will not get as close to the wall as the orbital.

No matter what machine you use, you still have to pay particular attention to the edges of the floor and match the sanding scratches where you transition from the orbital, drum, or Trio, to whatever machine you use at the perimeter (I always used a Clarke Super 7 edger). Also remember to scrape and hand sand into the corners. Failing to do this may produce a halo effect at the perimeter.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Hammerthumb

2532 posts in 1436 days


#13 posted 09-22-2016 02:20 PM

Almost forgot, you should also use a 16”-17” buffer with open coat screens after final sanding. Then hand sand the perimeter (always with the grain). Screens should be used up to 100 grit for stain floors, and to 150 grit for natural floors.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#14 posted 09-22-2016 03:34 PM



Totally agree with the others on not using a hand held power planer. A floor sander is the way to go—your back and the floors will thank you. Drum sanders take finish and wood off quickly, but you can damage the floor if not careful. I ve used them, but have come to prefer the orbital floor sanders with large rectangular pads. They are a bit slower than the drum sanders, but are much easier to control, there is almost no risk of gouging the floor and they get much closer to the walls than a drum sander.

When using a drum sander, I had to follow up with an edger. With the orbital, I didn t have to edge because it got close enough to the wall that the baseboard covered the little bit the sander didn t get.

There s also a type that uses three circular orbiting discs. I ve heard they are easy to use, as well, but don t have any experience with them.

- JayT

I’ve rented both the vibrating version and the random orbital version. The random orbital version (four 6” discs) cut much, much faster. I understand that they have reduced the weight of that version to make it more consumer friendly. The reduced weight might affect the sanding performance.

I rented mine from Home Depot. Buy way more discs than you imagine you will need and return the extras when you are done. Otherwise you will be making an extra trip while the rental clock is ticking.

You won’t need an edge sander with the RAS or vibrating floor sander. It sands right up to the edges. You might have some hand sanding in the corners, but that is all.

Very, very easy to use. I tried the belt version and it requires a skill set that has to be acquired.

As for the hand planer or any hand belt sander, it will take forever to get done; you will be on your hands and knees the entire time, and I doubt you can maintain a flat floor with that.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#15 posted 09-22-2016 03:46 PM

I’ve used the large orbital sanders they are EXCRUCIATINGLY slow. Yes, you can’t make a bad mistake, but how much is your time worth?

HIRE SOMEONE!!

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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