LumberJocks

Started a new shop cabinet today

  • Advertise with us

« back to Jigs & Fixtures forum

Forum topic by Woodchuck2010 posted 09-21-2016 11:03 PM 1005 views 1 time favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


09-21-2016 11:03 PM

Having a small shop, every inch counts. I really need screw and hardware storage. I came up with this idea. I’ll be installing doors and shelves and finish it to match my other shop furniture.

-- Chuck, Michigan,


22 replies so far

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#1 posted 09-22-2016 03:22 AM

Woodchuck2010,

Nice! You will really like having hardware in one location and close at hand. It looks like you will have plenty of storage; never enough of that.

Several years ago I too made a fastener cabinet, although not as large as yours. It has 24 bins, all filled with a fastener of some type. I also added a drawer and a shelf which quickly filled with a variety of screws and bolts. My collection of fasteners just seems to keep growing, although I should probably move some of those hardly ever used bolts, screws, and nails to another location and do some re-organizing. Anyway, your project looks like a great addition to the shop.

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

451 posts in 364 days


#2 posted 09-22-2016 03:37 AM

wow chuck, good job

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#3 posted 09-22-2016 03:50 AM

Thanks guys. I’ll post a pick of the finished project as soon as I’m done. I think I’ll use a French cleat to hang it.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 942 days


#4 posted 09-22-2016 12:44 PM

Nice. Suggestion on the vertical stacks of bins, put dividers in so you can pull one out individually.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#5 posted 09-22-2016 01:50 PM


Nice. Suggestion on the vertical stacks of bins, put dividers in so you can pull one out individually.

- rwe2156

Yeah you’re right. I was fabricating as I was going along and added the side compartments as an after thought. The bins lock together in the stacks so that wouldn’t be ideal if I wanted a single bin. Everything is dry fitted, so I can take it all apart and add dividers. I’ll probably have to lose a bin on each side to fit the dividers in. I guess I could use brads to secure the dividers if I use wood. Maybe mount little rails for the bins to slide onto. IDK .Ugh. lol

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#6 posted 09-22-2016 07:57 PM

Ok. I fixed the stacked bins with dividers. Much better access. Thx

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View fivecodys's profile

fivecodys

581 posts in 1098 days


#7 posted 09-22-2016 08:15 PM

I really like this.
How deep is the cabinet?

-- Chem, Central California

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#8 posted 09-22-2016 08:25 PM



I really like this.
How deep is the cabinet?

- fivecodys


It’s only 10” deep. Like I said, I have a small shop and can’t have anything sticking out too far.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View htl's profile

htl

2182 posts in 621 days


#9 posted 09-22-2016 10:11 PM

Great project and will come in really handy.

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#10 posted 09-22-2016 11:56 PM

I’m wondering about doors and what type of hinges to use. I don’t have a lot of experience with cabinet hinges. I was thinking maybe 1/2” plywood doors? What about some sort of latch? Self closing hinges? Idk

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#11 posted 09-23-2016 05:08 PM

Woodchuck2010,

Plywood does not always set flat, so I think ½” plywood by itself may not be the best choice for cabinet doors. Even ¾” plywood could cup or twist enough to prevent a nice seal. When I used ½” plywood as doors on my fastener cabinet, I added a border of ¾” X 1-1/2” solid wood, glued and screwed on edge to the plywood face. This border offers some advantages. The first is that it helps keep the plywood flat. The second, since the edges of border on the door close against the cabinet frame, a little added depth to the cabinet cavity is achieved. Some hangers (#4 finishing nails cut a little shorter) could be installed on the inside of the door within the cavity for those screws that come in packaging can be hung from a nail. The border could be rabbeted for a nicer look, but I chose to edge/face attach the border because it was faster and easier and offered an inside the cabinet cavity.

I used small inexpensive butt hinges that are not spring loaded on my fastener cabinet. I used one pair of hinges on each door, although if items will hang on the inside of the door, some additional hinges could be need. I installed double barrel latches at the top to hold the cabinet doors closed. However, since these are mounted at the top and the doors flex a bit, I find that I have to slam the doors closed for the latches to catch. I have also used window sash latches on my shop cabinets. I like the window sash latch style mainly because they are cheap and can draw a door tightly closed. I have also tried magnetic catches, but these seem to perform poorly in keeping doors closed.

I see no reason that self-closing hinges could not be used. If self-closing hinges are used, I am not sure a latch is required. If you go for 35 mm cup style hinges, a border around the plywood into which the cup would be drilled would be required since the cup depth may leave little or no ½” plywood on the outside surface without a border. If inexpensive surface mounted self-closing cabinet hinges are used, then three hinges may be needed to keep the doors closed since self-close mechanism may be too weak if only 2 hinges are used.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2851 posts in 2693 days


#12 posted 09-23-2016 07:13 PM

What do you have planned for the open areas?
Here are some pics of my cabinets. Yep, one car garage with a lot of stuff in it.
Hope it gives you some inspiration for your cabinet.

http://lumberjocks.com/MT_Stringer/blog/36520

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

3663 posts in 1727 days


#13 posted 09-23-2016 07:16 PM

That is one real handy looking cabinet.

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#14 posted 09-23-2016 08:34 PM


Woodchuck2010,

Plywood does not always set flat, so I think ½” plywood by itself may not be the best choice for cabinet doors. Even ¾” plywood could cup or twist enough to prevent a nice seal. When I used ½” plywood as doors on my fastener cabinet, I added a border of ¾” X 1-1/2” solid wood, glued and screwed on edge to the plywood face. This border offers some advantages. The first is that it helps keep the plywood flat. The second, since the edges of border on the door close against the cabinet frame, a little added depth to the cabinet cavity is achieved. Some hangers (#4 finishing nails cut a little shorter) could be installed on the inside of the door within the cavity for those screws that come in packaging can be hung from a nail. The border could be rabbeted for a nicer look, but I chose to edge/face attach the border because it was faster and easier and offered an inside the cabinet cavity.

I used small inexpensive butt hinges that are not spring loaded on my fastener cabinet. I used one pair of hinges on each door, although if items will hang on the inside of the door, some additional hinges could be need. I installed double barrel latches at the top to hold the cabinet doors closed. However, since these are mounted at the top and the doors flex a bit, I find that I have to slam the doors closed for the latches to catch. I have also used window sash latches on my shop cabinets. I like the window sash latch style mainly because they are cheap and can draw a door tightly closed. I have also tried magnetic catches, but these seem to perform poorly in keeping doors closed.

I see no reason that self-closing hinges could not be used. If self-closing hinges are used, I am not sure a latch is required. If you go for 35 mm cup style hinges, a border around the plywood into which the cup would be drilled would be required since the cup depth may leave little or no ½” plywood on the outside surface without a border. If inexpensive surface mounted self-closing cabinet hinges are used, then three hinges may be needed to keep the doors closed since self-close mechanism may be too weak if only 2 hinges are used.

- JBrow

Wow. Thank you. I was thinking about doing the frame on the doors. I never thought about doing it on the inside too for that extra room. Very good suggestions! Thanks!

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View Woodchuck2010's profile

Woodchuck2010

508 posts in 320 days


#15 posted 09-23-2016 08:48 PM



What do you have planned for the open areas?
Here are some pics of my cabinets. Yep, one car garage with a lot of stuff in it.
Hope it gives you some inspiration for your cabinet.

http://lumberjocks.com/MT_Stringer/blog/36520

- MT_Stringer

Very nice! Great ideas. I already made a charging and drill bit station. I have since added shelves to the inside.

As I mentioned in my post, I’m going to add shelves and a couple doors. I already drilled the shelf holes.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com