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Rot resistant wood stain? Asphaltum? Motor Oil?

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Forum topic by thoner7 posted 09-21-2016 12:16 PM 374 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thoner7

3 posts in 78 days


09-21-2016 12:16 PM

I am in the process of building a log cabin and need to find a good stain that will keep the fungi, bugs, and rot at bay. I know old timers would soak their fence posts in used motor oil and diesel fuel to keep them from rotting. Problem is the oil leeches out over time.

Is there a way to add a binder to motor oil? Like mixing with linseed oil?

I read on another forum that one guy who used diesel, tar, and linseed oil had problems with carpenter bees.

I know this would be somewhat toxic but that is kinda the point! I just don’t want anything leeching out and I want it to work. For the exterior only of course.


12 replies so far

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#1 posted 09-22-2016 12:19 AM

There is a pine tar concoction people use for that. Been meaning to try it myself.

Edit; seems that pine tar is the important ingredient, additives just make it easier to apply.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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bandit571

14597 posts in 2148 days


#2 posted 09-22-2016 12:30 AM

Creosote?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#3 posted 09-22-2016 12:35 AM

Just paint it. Everything else I used was worthless unless you are in a dry climate. Zahr outdoor poly might be an option but very expensive.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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thoner7

3 posts in 78 days


#4 posted 09-22-2016 01:24 AM

Any idea where the find the pine tar recipe and info? I did a quick google search and found nothing.

Can you even buy creosote anymore? Not sure that would be the solution either??

Sorry – pain is not an option !

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#5 posted 09-22-2016 02:03 AM

Pine tar and turpentine.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Tony1212

111 posts in 1200 days


#6 posted 09-22-2016 04:26 PM

Shou sugi ban?

And you get to stay in touch with your inner pyromaniac, as well.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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ScottM

346 posts in 1612 days


#7 posted 09-22-2016 05:40 PM



Creosote?

- bandit571

Ahhh, the good old days. That smell…and the burn when you rubbed up against it. Yeah, it was painful but would last for decades. The wood. The burning would only last a few days.

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mahdee

3553 posts in 1233 days


#8 posted 09-22-2016 06:03 PM

When they banned Creosote, the farm supply stores started carrying something called “Cre Sod”. It came in a can and you mixed a few tablespoon to a gallon and dipped your animals in it. It killed everything and had a very reasonable price. Cow ranchers also used it to treat the cloth on the cow back rub to control bugs and lice on the cow’s back. Anyways, same stuff you smell at the railroad track and highly poisonous. If you can find a remote farm supply store, you might find a can or two of it. However, motor oils, Creosote and other chemicals like them are not worth risking you or your family’s health and wellbeing.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Kelly

1113 posts in 2409 days


#9 posted 09-23-2016 01:11 AM

I just picked up a few quarts of pine tar a few months ago at a horsey store for ten a quart. I mix it with boiled linseed oil and turpentine and use it on exterior projects. It soaks in nice, which is critical to long term protection.

The pine tar mix is what THE old war rifles had for a finish. It doesn’t leave a gloss finish, and it isn’t tacky. Obviously, considering the treatment those rifles got, it holds up well.

I don’t think the problem with oil is that it leeches out as much as it is that it wicks to the next dry spot, be that wood or dirt. When I use non-hardening oils I note it takes about three or more coats before it looks like you did anything. That’s because of the wicking action and the resulting cumulative nature of the applications.

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thoner7

3 posts in 78 days


#10 posted 09-25-2016 09:20 PM

So considering I am building a log cabin with 20 inch logs, do you think that the oil will just be drawn into the center of the log as it dries? That would be ideal.

With a large roof overhang I am hoping that I don’t get much water on the house anyways.


I just picked up a few quarts of pine tar a few months ago at a horsey store for ten a quart. I mix it with boiled linseed oil and turpentine and use it on exterior projects. It soaks in nice, which is critical to long term protection.

The pine tar mix is what THE old war rifles had for a finish. It doesn t leave a gloss finish, and it isn t tacky. Obviously, considering the treatment those rifles got, it holds up well.

I don t think the problem with oil is that it leeches out as much as it is that it wicks to the next dry spot, be that wood or dirt. When I use non-hardening oils I note it takes about three or more coats before it looks like you did anything. That s because of the wicking action and the resulting cumulative nature of the applications.

- Kelly


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Kelly

1113 posts in 2409 days


#11 posted 09-25-2016 09:54 PM

Sure, a few generations down the road and with aggressive maintenance. ;)

I’m no oil scientist, but I believe some will stay on the surface, but much of it will just wick to the dryer areas until all of it’s thin, rather than flow to the center. For that reason, it’s a good idea to be aggressive early on, so the outer surface doesn’t dry quick and produce the cracks common to big timers.

Focus on the ends the most, just as you would if you were drying wood for your everyday wood projects. It might be a good idea to look at the pine tar formula (see below) for that area.

I built garage doors from cedar I gathered from a spalt pile (the leavings of a cedar mill). Once up, I treated them with used motor oil thinned about fifteen percent. It wasn’t until the third coat it remained obvious I’d treated the wood even years after the fact.

_

Here is a popular old-time marine oil recipe that you can make yourself (feel free to adjust the proportions according to your needs):

  • 1 part gum or pine turpentine
  • 1 part boiled linseed oil
  • 1/2 part pine tar
  • 1/4 part Japan drier

You may also considering adding an oil-based wood preservative to the mix (say, 5-15%) to inhibit mildew in wetter climates. Be aware the pine tar and linseed oil can make for a very dark finish.

http://www.gregboats.com/pages/finishes.html

Note: I’ve been collecting all the pitch off our pine trees and have about a gallon and a half. I’m going to experiment with it, once I get it cleaned up. It should provide a resin base for altering a hardening oil. We’ll see.

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pontic

51 posts in 74 days


#12 posted 09-25-2016 10:07 PM

We had a log cabin in Elkton Md. This is on the Bay. We used a paint made of 1 gal water and 1lb sweet lime and 3/4 cup of ammonia. Needed to slather it on and best applied in the heat of the summer. We did this every 2-3 years depending on how wet the season was. the cabin was sold in the 70”s and from what I hear from my brother it is still inhabited and doing well. Drawback is it only comes in white.

-- drpurvis@aol.com

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