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vertical support of freestanding mirror

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Forum topic by af8567 posted 09-21-2016 12:16 PM 236 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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af8567

2 posts in 76 days


09-21-2016 12:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: vertical support mirror barn doors

I’m building a double sided (mirrors on both sides), freestanding mirror for a salon. Each side is built to look like an old door with a mirror in it.
Here’s an example of a single sided door/mirror (the salmon colored one) that leans against the wall in another part of the salon.

What I want to do is build a freestanding version of this where the 2 stylists would face each and have a mirror on both sides, see pic.

The “doors” are essential 2 pieces of plywood with 3/4 lumber making the design and rabbeted to hold the mirror. Its 32” wide by 80” high. My thought is to build a base about 40” by 20”. Then slide the double sided mirror/ door in a big mortise in the base. I’m not too sure this would be enough to support a freestanding piece. The owner would prefer I not have big triangle outriggers supporting the doors. Also the ceiling has a huge fluorescent fixture above the location, so ceiling support is not an option. Maybe add some metal? Thank you in advance for any thoughts anyone could lend.


9 replies so far

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Slemi

103 posts in 1004 days


#1 posted 09-21-2016 01:16 PM

Maybe just freestanding with wire from the ceiling holding it up? For better stability, each wire could be fixed in two places and be shaped like V.

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ScottM

346 posts in 1610 days


#2 posted 09-21-2016 02:29 PM



Maybe just freestanding with wire from the ceiling holding it up? For better stability, each wire could be fixed in two places and be shaped like V.

- Slemi

That’s the first thing that popped into my head too; hang it from the ceiling.

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clin

513 posts in 459 days


#3 posted 09-21-2016 05:12 PM

A 20” wide base gives you 10” on each side. Say the whole “door” weighs 100 lbs. You have a 100 lbs x 10” = 1,000 lb-in of moment holding the thing upright.

If someone bumps it (and they will with 100% certainty), lets assume they bump it about 4 ft above the floor. Call this 50 in to make the math easy. They would need to apply just 1000 lb-in/50 in = 20 lbs of force to rock it up on it’s edge. Now, that doesn’t mean it will start tipping. That’s a function of how much they make it lean. But again, it will only take 20 lbs of force to make it starting leaning, and less and less force as it leans more an more.

And what if someone leans against it, thinking it is much more secure than it is?

If there is no overhead attachment, the base needs to be very heavy (think cast iron) or bolted to the floor and the door needs to be attached to it, not just resting in a mortise.

Because this is a public space, I think the shop owner would be crazy to do this and NOT attach it to the ceiling, or have it bolted to the floor.

Since only wires are needed, I’m sure there is some way to run a few that avoid the light fixture. And paint them the right color and they would be hardly noticeable. Or perhaps use something that would match the decor.

Bottom line is a 7 foot tall panel, with a 20” wide base seems like it would have too much potential for tipping.

-- Clin

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Slemi

103 posts in 1004 days


#4 posted 09-21-2016 05:55 PM


Maybe just freestanding with wire from the ceiling holding it up? For better stability, each wire could be fixed in two places and be shaped like V.

- Slemi


I just now read all the text and saw that the ceiling wires will not go. If this is not far from the wall, You might get a beam on top of the mirror to the wall, and add small t-hape on the wall at the end of the beam for greater stability?

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jbay

814 posts in 362 days


#5 posted 09-21-2016 06:10 PM

You need to sink a couple pieces of flat bar or rebar into the foundation and run it up into the door or on the ends of the door.

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

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Cooler

272 posts in 307 days


#6 posted 09-21-2016 06:18 PM

If it were me, I would buy a salvage vintage door and clean it up a bit and then add a wall mount vanity mirror to each side. The wall mount vanity mirrors have tilt adjustment and allow up and down tilt. It looks nice and only 4 screws required (and generally supplied with the mirror).

Here is an example: http://www.signaturehardware.com/media/catalog/product/4/2/420820-rectangular-mirror-with-373678-wall-bracket-brushed-nickel.jpg

Or just buy the hardware from Amazon.com and get your own mirror: https://www.amazon.com/Brushed-Nickel-Victorian-Mirror-Pivots/dp/B000KWTTP0

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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jbay

814 posts in 362 days


#7 posted 09-21-2016 06:29 PM



If it were me, I would buy a salvage vintage door and clean it up a bit and then add a wall mount vanity mirror to each side. The wall mount vanity mirrors have tilt adjustment and allow up and down tilt. It looks nice and only 4 screws required (and generally supplied with the mirror).

Here is an example: http://www.signaturehardware.com/media/catalog/product/4/2/420820-rectangular-mirror-with-373678-wall-bracket-brushed-nickel.jpg

Or just buy the hardware from Amazon.com and get your own mirror: https://www.amazon.com/Brushed-Nickel-Victorian-Mirror-Pivots/dp/B000KWTTP0

- Cooler

uh, what holds the door up? :>/

-- My “MO” involves Judging others, playing God, acting as LJs law enforcement, and never admitting any of my ideas could possibly be wrong or anyone else's idea could possibly be correct -- (A1Jim)

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

272 posts in 307 days


#8 posted 09-21-2016 06:59 PM


If it were me, I would buy a salvage vintage door and clean it up a bit and then add a wall mount vanity mirror to each side. The wall mount vanity mirrors have tilt adjustment and allow up and down tilt. It looks nice and only 4 screws required (and generally supplied with the mirror).

Here is an example: http://www.signaturehardware.com/media/catalog/product/4/2/420820-rectangular-mirror-with-373678-wall-bracket-brushed-nickel.jpg

Or just buy the hardware from Amazon.com and get your own mirror: https://www.amazon.com/Brushed-Nickel-Victorian-Mirror-Pivots/dp/B000KWTTP0

- Cooler

uh, what holds the door up? :>/

- jbay

I would make a plywood base with 4 casters and mount the door to the center of the base. I think you would need about 18 to 24 inches on either side of the door to ensure stability. You could make a smaller “box” for it to rest on and fill it with concrete for ballast. The extra weight would supply some of the stability.

I don’t think there is a stability table to look this up on. You will probably have to make some tests.

If you get a panel door you can mount some baskets or pockets to hold magazines or supplies low on the door. That will lower the center of gravity and help with the stability.

Or (my idea) make a box large enough to hold a small shop vac and then they have a handy way to clean their work station. Vanity lights around the mirror and the vacuum and you have a brand new category of beauty salon equipment.

Something small like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-gal-5-0-Peak-HP-Wet-Dry-Vac-WD4070/202077241?cm_mmc=Shopping%7cTHD%7cG%7c0%7cG-VF-PLA-D25T-Ridgid%7c&gclid=CPev0LaRoc8CFVFZhgodGmMFiQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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af8567

2 posts in 76 days


#9 posted 09-21-2016 08:11 PM

Thank you all for your well thought out replies. Clin especially for the formula. That will help me further in my design. I neglected to mention in my post that i can easily bolt to the floor. SO my thought (thank you jbay) would be to make a flat bar T that would slide into the side of the vertical door and the base that is bolted to the floor. Any thoughts has to how far up the vertical part I need to come with the flat bar to support a 80” vertical door?

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