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Walnut Crib Finsh?

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Forum topic by MrHart posted 09-21-2016 12:43 AM 515 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrHart

46 posts in 1747 days


09-21-2016 12:43 AM

Good evening all, I am ready to finish a walnut crib for my daughter. Im not a big finish guy, and I want it safe for kids, very easy for repairs or to spruce up between kids.
I have natural Danish oil.
Will this bring out the natural beauty of walnut and be what I am expecting?

I was going to steel wool and cost 2-3 times and the wax.

Please all opinions

Thanks!

-- MrHart


31 replies so far

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 166 days


#1 posted 09-21-2016 01:38 AM

http://www.dapwood.com/danish-oil/
I wouldn’t use Danish oil.
They say all finishes are safe after they cure, but some are not safe for a year. Depends on which report you read.
Shellac on the other hand, hell they use that stuff to coat apples in the grocery store. If it were my kid id play it safe. Research the shellac.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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MrHart

46 posts in 1747 days


#2 posted 09-21-2016 01:45 AM

Holy Crap!

what do you recommend sir?

-- MrHart

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 166 days


#3 posted 09-21-2016 01:50 AM

Shellac, Research it, I was serious they use it in the food industry, not so much anymore. But get you some pure shellac flakes mix it up, The denatured alcohol will evaporate its safe you’re kid will be fine. Id also be wary of waxes.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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bondogaposis

4030 posts in 1815 days


#4 posted 09-21-2016 03:38 AM

Mineral oil and beeswax, mix 4 parts oil to 1 part beeswax. Heat it together in a double boiler until it is blended. Makes a soft non-toxic wax. I mean really your kid isn’t going to being eating the crib, but in case he or she gnaws on a rail it will be safe.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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jwmalone

769 posts in 166 days


#5 posted 09-21-2016 04:49 AM

Oh yes That’s something I almost forgot. Mr. Bondogposis has a an old method that’s tried an true.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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pmayer

864 posts in 2529 days


#6 posted 09-21-2016 01:40 PM

I second the recommendation of bondo. This approach would make it super easy to refresh the finish for each new child that uses it. You could also just use straight mineral oil.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View McFly's profile

McFly

188 posts in 491 days


#7 posted 09-21-2016 08:45 PM



Mineral oil and beeswax, mix 4 parts oil to 1 part beeswax. Heat it together in a double boiler until it is blended. Makes a soft non-toxic wax. I mean really your kid isn t going to being eating the crib, but in case he or she gnaws on a rail it will be safe.

- bondogaposis

+1!
You can also use the butcher block Conditioner you find at Home Depot. It has food grade mineral oil, beeswax and carnauba wax as well.

It brings out the luster you want and will buff to a pretty sweet shine.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

626 posts in 1416 days


#8 posted 09-21-2016 08:56 PM

I was also going to mention the Howard Butcher Block Conditioner, like McFly suggested. I use it on cutting boards and it works great. I even include a bottle with every end grain cutting board I give away to friends. Just delivered one not more than an hour ago to a friend who is moving to Arizona.

I hesitated when I thought about the size of your project because the commercial pre-mix costs way more than rolling your own at home. I believe that the ratio in the commercial stuff has less beeswax than Bondo’s recipe. The exact recipe is not rocket science. It does help to warm the stuff up before applying to make it easier to spread around and to help it absorb into the wood.

View Dabcan's profile

Dabcan

252 posts in 2135 days


#9 posted 09-22-2016 02:53 AM

I’d go with shellac, it’s what gives Smarties their shine, so it can’t be bad for you… I did my daughters crib in water based poly, but it was birch and I wanted to keep it from yellowing, walnut looks bad with water based poly.

-- @craftcollectif , http://www.craftcollective.ca, https://www.etsy.com/shop/craftcollective?

View MrHart's profile

MrHart

46 posts in 1747 days


#10 posted 09-22-2016 11:15 AM

Thanks guys!
I will post a pic!

-- MrHart

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1041 days


#11 posted 09-22-2016 12:58 PM

I used general finishes salad bowl finish. Was going to use bees wax and mineral oil like i use on my cutting boards but figured the salad bowl finish shouldn’t need to be reapplied like beeswax mineral oil.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

294 posts in 213 days


#12 posted 09-22-2016 01:53 PM

Last two cribs I made, I used Minwax Antique oil on the walnut. It cures fairly quickly, and once cured is completely safe. And, how long is a newborn going to be in a crib? They’ll be out long before they can chew on it. It’s the baby bed finish that’s going to be chewed on.

View Fatherlewis's profile

Fatherlewis

30 posts in 90 days


#13 posted 09-22-2016 02:42 PM

At the risk of hi-jacking your thread, it seems appropriate to go ahead and ask here, since it is already open.

I am getting ready to finish my infant’s crib, but mine is of lowly pine. Woodworking on a budget.

I was really thinking about putting a poly on, as I know they are safe once cured appropriately. Would the butcher block finish be just as easy, and would it finish ok on pine?

-- Zach, Ohio

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 166 days


#14 posted 09-22-2016 04:30 PM

Pine can be a beautiful wood, I’ve never used the butcher block stuff though.
AS far as being lowly, I doubt the three wise men commented on the manger being made from a lowly common wood when they brought their gifts :) The point is you built it with your own two hands.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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Fatherlewis

30 posts in 90 days


#15 posted 09-22-2016 06:31 PM



Pine can be a beautiful wood, I ve never used the butcher block stuff though.
AS far as being lowly, I doubt the three wise men commented on the manger being made from a lowly common wood when they brought their gifts :) The point is you built it with your own two hands.

- jwmalone

Yeah, that is precisely what I was going for. I am a very green woodworker, but I have thoroughly enjoyed the initial experience. I can’t wait to save up some money and buy more and better tools that will allow me the opportunity to do more detailed and fine work. It can be a very costly hobby though. I might try some of the butcher block conditioner and trying it on a scrap piece of wood to see how it finishes. Thank you jw!

-- Zach, Ohio

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