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Forum topic by DromSealis posted 09-20-2016 02:48 PM 1045 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DromSealis

43 posts in 636 days


09-20-2016 02:48 PM

(Section edited out; it seems people treated this portion of my OP as the main focus of the thread, which it isn’t; it was merely ‘extra read’. I realized that it served no functional purpose to the content at hand and, furthermore, caused a distracting shift in focus from my actual intention; two of the first three members who replied didn’t actually answer my questions… Albeit, I do have to admit that my “specificality” statement, which I wasn’t aware till now that I used three times in a sentence, was quite frivolous. =P)

1 – I have a design for a product that’s supposed to take on the shape of a candle holder. I’d like to incorporate two accent rings with lacquer spray. Considering that the rings are ~.125” – ~.25”, I understand that spraying the lacquer probably wouldn’t be a first idea, as the areas are very narrow and hard to do. (Consult the following 3d-rendered diagram)

a) Is this possible to do with a small paint brush and not have ‘brush rings’ after application?

b) What kind of paint brush would be recommended for this kind of job?

c) Can regular wood finish/varnish/oil/other finishing wood agent be applied on top of the lacquer with no problem of scraping off? If not, what can/should be done to prevent lacquer contact with skin and the rest of the outside world?

2 – What is a decent glue to paste Holly lumber together? I have a set of 4/4 10” pieces that I like to join together to create a 4-inch thick turning block.

(I have at least one other question which escaped me at the moment.)

Thanks,
Drom

-- Drom


39 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4452 posts in 3423 days


#1 posted 09-20-2016 03:52 PM

” I didn’t specifically specify certain specificalities”........

I am at a loss to help you specifically. Can you be more specific?
I don’t EVEN know what you’re asking.
Bill (who is struggling with redundancy)

-- bill@magraphics.us

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

977 posts in 916 days


#2 posted 09-20-2016 04:15 PM

Use a foam brush and a lazy susan. No brush marks and you can paint evenly as it spins.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 165 days


#3 posted 09-20-2016 04:21 PM

I believe you should take some wood working classes. First this is not an insult, just constructive input. You need to spend time with the guy and see what’s involved in bringing you’re designs to life. You may discover he’s not a cheapskate or you may find you need a new partner? I worked for a lady once doing faux finishes. She had no hands on experience, her knowledge was based on some classes she took and YouTube videos. She constantly accused us of charging to much and general incompetence because the jobs could not be completed in the time or manner she thought they should. Customers were happy the work was great. Due to her lack of field experience or real world application she could not understand what actually went into the process. I have known several people in you’re situation. The only ONE that was successful spent lots of time with his craftsmen learning the process. By doing so he knew who was cheap, incompetent, and who was damn good and charged a fair price. This applies to any trade or skill. Not many who go into business and plan to hire others to make something of their design because they cant actually make it. I see them all the time.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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DromSealis

43 posts in 636 days


#4 posted 09-20-2016 05:56 PM

Jwmalone, I’m colaborating with my woodworker.

Let’s please not shift focus too much. Can you answer my two questions?

MadMark, I know exactly that you’re not actually wanting me to take you seriously. (Foam brushes will not get into the quite small, narrow seeps.)

-- Drom

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1453 days


#5 posted 09-20-2016 06:46 PM

Foam brush cut down for larger areas, small artist or modelers brush for the small crevices. A thought – a properly sized string, dip the middle in paint, and hold momentarily to the desired area while spinning on the lathe. Ive burned a lot of accents with wire on the lathe, a string may work for paint.

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jwmalone

769 posts in 165 days


#6 posted 09-20-2016 07:04 PM

Well, MadMark answered one question. Foam brushes come in infinite array of sizes and shapes, that lazy susan is a new one to me thanks Mark. MadMark is very talented check his projects, he was dead serious. Or mask it and use an air brush.

AS far as finishes over lacquer sure. Ask your paint supplier to recommend one.

I’m not a turner, cant advise on that question. Tight bond is what I use but don’t know if you can turn laminated piece.

I think you should shift focus a bit, if you collaborate with your woodworker like you collaborate with us…...... well its not going to work, sorry. If you are asking questions here so you can tell some one else how to do it, you need to hire someone else. If your goal is simply to hire semi skilled workers to build beautiful pieces from your imagination to be sold at a profit. They already do that its called made in china. If you want premium pieces you need a highly skilled individual, but they are not cheap.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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DromSealis

43 posts in 636 days


#7 posted 09-20-2016 07:13 PM


Foam brush cut down for larger areas, small artist or modelers brush for the small crevices. A thought – a properly sized string, dip the middle in paint, and hold momentarily to the desired area while spinning on the lathe. Ive burned a lot of accents with wire on the lathe, a string may work for paint.

- OSU55

That’s an interesting idea. The string will have to be quite thin, though.

Would you happen to know what kind of material would work best? (Plastick, wool, Horse hair, etc.)

JWM, I’ll get to your response in a bit.

-- Drom

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 165 days


#8 posted 09-20-2016 08:05 PM

lmao.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

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DromSealis

43 posts in 636 days


#9 posted 09-24-2016 08:11 PM

“He was dead serious.”

lmao

-- Drom

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1642 posts in 1780 days


#10 posted 09-24-2016 08:20 PM

Consider having the parts turned separately so they can be finished prior to assembly. An alternative is to turn the beads, paint them then finish turning the rest of the piece. That would require a very skilled turner to pull off.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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DromSealis

43 posts in 636 days


#11 posted 09-24-2016 08:30 PM

Do you mean have lacquered components and main body and base as separate pieces to be glued together after lacquering?

If so, I did unofficially entertain this. However, I did forget to mention: I would like to try make this all one piece. Gluing separate pieces together maybe the easiest way to go about this, but not necessarily the most beneficial: The product I’m creating comes in a myriad of wood species, many of which are hard and dense oily woods that aren’t very friendly with gluing.

Since these will become game pieces that clack with other game pieces, I know I should absolutely try to avoid this option until all other options to go about this as one piece are exhausted. Even then, I might have to drop the design and try a new one.

-- Drom

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JAAune

1642 posts in 1780 days


#12 posted 09-24-2016 08:47 PM

Yes, that was my first suggestion.

The second one would be turning everything out of a solid block but in two stages. The first stage involves roughing the entire piece to a nearly-completed state. Then the two beads that are destined for silver paint get finished and painted. At this point you can slop paint around so long as the beads are completely coated. Then a final pass is taken on the rest of the turning which removes all stray paint but leaves the silver beads untouched.

The reason a skilled turner is needed is because few people have enough control to do a final cut in one pass without damaging adjacent areas.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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DromSealis

43 posts in 636 days


#13 posted 09-24-2016 09:03 PM

“The reason a skilled turner is needed is because few people have enough control to do a final cut in one pass without damaging adjacent areas.”

Absolutely. And, this was very much what I was afraid of: as I’m shipping my (quite expensive) stockpile of exotic woods internationally with little to no control over it once my biz partner receives in his factory, a silly icing-on-cake feature as silver lacquered beads might not be the most financially sound for this product. I may end of just dropping it and reverting back to the original mono-chromatic look.

Of course, it (your latter suggestion) may work, since my biz partner’s company has existed for more than 40 years. And, he and his workers will be experimenting on common boxwood.

On another note, one other member suggested alternatively to foam-brush the general bead area and using a very thin string to paint into the hard-to-access crevice (transitional seep where lacquered bead meets unlacquered main body, head or base.). I don’t know how efficient this is yet (since I haven’t asked my biz partner to try it), but logically-sounding, it does somewhat seem like something that could work.

-- Drom

View hairy's profile

hairy

2384 posts in 2995 days


#14 posted 09-25-2016 12:37 PM

How about acrylic paints, with a very small brush, painted with the piece on the lathe. You can get it smooth. Spray poly over acrylic paint is a nice finish.

I’ve done this on basswood, holly might absorb differently. Many folks apply liquid lacquer on the wood before painting. That way you can get paint errors off without it soaking into the wood.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

View REO's profile

REO

889 posts in 1537 days


#15 posted 09-25-2016 01:07 PM

Drom I think you need to learn to be the customer and not the professional or as some have suggested learn from the professionals. You ask your questions with a preconceived acceptable answer and then shoot down the answers with arguments you have not proven. In my opinion You should learn to turn your own parts because as a professional wood worker I would avoid your commission. You are impossible to satisfy and wont be taught.

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