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best ideas on stripping and refinishing?

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Forum topic by KenBry posted 09-19-2016 03:10 AM 520 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


09-19-2016 03:10 AM

So I was in Crate and barrel today looking at a piece I was gonna copy. Low and behold they had it 1/5th the original price. Well, that was cheaper than anything I could build for the money. So I bought it. Now I want to refinish it in a darker stain. It looks to only have a clear coat on it. But could use some opinions.

Also what wood do you think that is? Oak or elm?

Right side up for those that had issue with it.

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.


18 replies so far

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#1 posted 09-19-2016 03:15 AM

another image

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#2 posted 09-19-2016 03:20 AM

Before you do any sanding make sure it is not veneered particle board.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#3 posted 09-19-2016 04:48 AM

Its not, is solid, look at those finger joints. The piece is from Crate and Barrel, and they actually do not use veneers in 95% of thier furniture. If you have never been in one of thier stores, the furniture is allot of fun to look at.

The thickness of that wood is 1 1/2” thats how deep those joints are.

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#4 posted 09-19-2016 04:50 PM

Do you guys think I should try using some kind of stripper or just do ahead and start sanding?

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#5 posted 09-19-2016 04:52 PM

Looks like an oak.

I’d strip and sand if necessary.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#6 posted 09-19-2016 07:08 PM

Check their catalog. They often include the species in the description.

Are the pores deep? If so, then I would agree with Fridge and suppose it to be oak. It looks like oak.

It will be hard to sand out all the pores if it is oak so I think that a stripper and Tri-Sodium Phosphate and then sand.

And I agree Crate & Barrel (and Restoration Hardware) make some pretty nice stuff with robust construction and robust prices too.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#7 posted 09-22-2016 03:51 PM

Unfortunately this is a discontinued piece and is no longer listed in the Catalog so I could not find a good description of the wood species. Yes, their prices are very high and I never would have bought this thing at the original $2800 + 8.7% tax price. However at $500 out the door… I said what the hell, I don’t think I could have built this for anything close to that price. By the time I would be done getting the construction finished and hardware bought plus my time. I had originally planned on copying it and build it out of Walnut but I can settle for Oak stained dark

Today I spent a large amount of time sanding the outer cabinet area with my belt sander. After getting it all sanded I think it’s white oak. All quarter sawn to boot.

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1633 days


#8 posted 09-22-2016 03:56 PM

Sanding is probably the way to go if you have the time. The wood in the pictures you have posted is not quartersawn.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#9 posted 09-22-2016 04:03 PM


Unfortunately this is a discontinued piece and is no longer listed in the Catalog so I could not find a good description of the wood species. Yes, their prices are very high and I never would have bought this thing at the original $2800 + 8.7% tax price. However at $500 out the door… I said what the hell, I don t think I could have built this for anything close to that price. By the time I would be done getting the construction finished and hardware bought plus my time. I had originally planned on copying it and build it out of Walnut but I can settle for Oak stained dark

Today I spent a large amount of time sanding the outer cabinet area with my belt sander. After getting it all sanded I think it s white oak. All quarter sawn to boot.

- KenBry

Do a final “block sanding” using a long piece of self adhesive sand paper attached to a 24” long piece of perfectly flat plywood or particle board. This will take out any hills or valleys your sanding may have created. Those will show up once you apply a finish.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#10 posted 09-22-2016 08:50 PM



Sanding is probably the way to go if you have the time. The wood in the pictures you have posted is not quartersawn.

- johnstoneb


Your right, I spaced it for a few, the doors are all quartersawn, I had been sanding all the doors for the last two hours and kinda went brain dead…

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#11 posted 09-22-2016 08:54 PM


Unfortunately this is a discontinued piece and is no longer listed in the Catalog so I could not find a good description of the wood species. Yes, their prices are very high and I never would have bought this thing at the original $2800 + 8.7% tax price. However at $500 out the door… I said what the hell, I don t think I could have built this for anything close to that price. By the time I would be done getting the construction finished and hardware bought plus my time. I had originally planned on copying it and build it out of Walnut but I can settle for Oak stained dark

Today I spent a large amount of time sanding the outer cabinet area with my belt sander. After getting it all sanded I think it s white oak. All quarter sawn to boot.

- KenBry

Do a final “block sanding” using a long piece of self adhesive sand paper attached to a 24” long piece of perfectly flat plywood or particle board. This will take out any hills or valleys your sanding may have created. Those will show up once you apply a finish.

- Cooler

Never thought of that, fortunately I only have to do one surface. But I wonder if I go with a flat sealer will it still show so much? My plan is to go to a DARK brown stain then use a Flat sealer on it.

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

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KenBry

469 posts in 1908 days


#12 posted 10-19-2016 09:48 PM

Finished or shall I say refinished. lots of sanding, Old masters dark walnut paste stain, and Armor seal satin. Yea, the lighting makes it look glossy but its satin… really

-- Ken, USAF MSgt, Ret.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2221 days


#13 posted 10-20-2016 02:00 PM

Sand if you want to, but before you do you can save yourself a LOT of work by trying my time tested stripping/refinishing method. Get a gallon of brush cleaner from Lowes or Home Depot. Brush cleaner is pretty much paint stripper without the “glop” (and its great for cleaning brushes, leaving the brushes clean and supple for the next job). Then use a wad of 0000 (four ought) very fine steel wool dipped in the brush cleaner to scrub the surface of the wood to remove the finish. The steel wool gives a good scrubbing action to remove the finish and leave the wood smooth and needing no sanding and ready for the color change with stain and/or clear finish. Rubber gloves are advisable, however I have often done this with bare hands as I seem to tolerate brush cleaner, but it takes a lot of washing to clean up afterwards.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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Carloz

172 posts in 52 days


#14 posted 10-20-2016 02:33 PM

I understand you bolted that thingy to the ceiling but how did you manage to attach the car there too?

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DrDirt

4167 posts in 3203 days


#15 posted 10-20-2016 02:49 PM

I would strip, so maybe you can get some stuff out of the pores.

But since much of the pores will be ‘sealed’ from their finishing process, I think you will need to use a Gel Stain to get an even color, because penetration will vary from region to region on the piece – I see a lot of wild grain.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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