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I got a Stanley 45!

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Forum topic by Marn64 posted 09-18-2016 06:26 PM 532 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marn64

209 posts in 251 days


09-18-2016 06:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane

Hey everyone,
So last week I posted about how I found a Stanley 45 at habitat for humanity’s ReStore. Well, on Thursday my boss came up to me and said out of the blue “You can have the plane for 100$”. Coincidentally, my 17th birthday is coming up this month and my dad got it for me! It appears to be a 1901 B casting, also, any tips on restoration and sharpening the irons?


Its missing its rear depth stop screw


Am I missing something here or are those router blades…..

the right long arm is longer than the left, leading me to believe that the one on the right isn’t original

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee


11 replies so far

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 167 days


#1 posted 09-18-2016 06:32 PM

I got mine on eBay hasn’t arrived yet. There is a whole forum on here about the #45. I’ve been following it check it out. There is also a blog by mosquito that explains a lot. may help to.
Have fun. You can by parts on ebay as well.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View Fraxinus's profile

Fraxinus

25 posts in 197 days


#2 posted 09-18-2016 08:22 PM

Those are indeed router plane irons.

I have a love/hate relationship with my 45. It can be frustrating as hell, but when it works it’s great. I’m pretty new to woodworking, so I’m thinking it’s a combination of an old tool that needs to be tuned and a new woodworker that needs to learn better technique.

Re. the irons, I got mine with a full set. Many of them were probably never used, most still have the mill marks on the back. When I need a particular iron I’ll flatten the back on a coarse diamond stone (just the first inch or so), then get it as close to a mirror polish as I can on finer diamond stones. Then I’ll do the bevel, working my way up to a 4000 grit waterstone. Mine are pretty rust free, but if there’s pitting on the edge I’ll work that out on a very coarse diamond stone, or sandpaper.

I flattened the wood part of the fence, it had a pronounced crown in the middle. Didn’t take long, just a few swipes with a jack or jointer plane.

Knocking the rust off all the screws/bolts and their female threads, then lubricating them, is also a good idea. I broke the casting on the fence that came with my plane, one of the bolts had seized up and when I tried to get it out it broke off part of the casting, taking a good chunk of the female thread with it. Could no longer tighten the fence. I was pretty bummed, tried to epoxy it back on, but in the end I had to buy a new fence.

Enjoy your new 45. It will probably test your patience, but it’s an extremely versatile little plane and very handy to have around.

View Mosquito's profile (online now)

Mosquito

8111 posts in 1757 days


#3 posted 09-19-2016 12:58 AM

Looks like a nice #45 to me. The box is fantastic, I’d leave that as is for sure.

It would be a type 8, from 1907-1908. It came originally with 19 cutters plus the slitter, which looks like you’ve got all of from your pictures, so you’re good there. And as jwmalone mentioned, yes those are router plane blades. Well worth $100 to me.

As far as restoring it goes, I typically try to do as little as I can. If it’s rusty, I like to use naval jelly and an acid brush to take care of that. Beyond that, I just use a hand held brass brush to break up any built up saw dust, or anything like that.

Sharpening the irons for grooves, rabbets, and dadoes just like you would anything else, chisel, plane iron, etc. With the beading irons, I clean up the bevel side with an appropriately sized dowel rod with some sand paper wrapped around it. Try not to widen it at all though, as that effects the proportion of the flat to bead.

Otherwise, have some fun, #45 is one of my favorite planes to use, and was one of the first 5 hand planes I ever bought :-)

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1773 posts in 603 days


#4 posted 09-19-2016 11:57 AM

Nice plane Benjamin. Great score with it being complete and of that vintage for a C-note. Doesn’t look like much restoration is needed from the pictures. Just clean everything up and make everything nice and sharp. I don’t have a 45 (or any beading/moulding planes) but I’m guessing there’s a bit of a learning curve to sharpening all them fancy cutters.

Tell your Dad my birthday’s in August. ;-P

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2198 posts in 946 days


#5 posted 09-19-2016 01:09 PM

What Ken ^ said.

Nice to find one with the fence knob and original box. Looks like you’ve got a fairly complete set of irons plus short and log rods. Looks like only things missing are irons box and splitter screw.

The love/hate thing is kind of true, but once you get the ergonomics of using them, it can be a useful tool.

As with any tool, make sure the irons are super sharp, or you won’t have an optimal experience ;-)

Which means you’ll be entering the sharpening vortex. (Welcome to ww’ing).

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

209 posts in 251 days


#6 posted 09-19-2016 03:57 PM



Looks like a nice #45 to me. The box is fantastic, I d leave that as is for sure.

It would be a type 8, from 1907-1908. It came originally with 19 cutters plus the slitter, which looks like you ve got all of from your pictures, so you re good there. And as jwmalone mentioned, yes those are router plane blades. Well worth $100 to me.

As far as restoring it goes, I typically try to do as little as I can. If it s rusty, I like to use naval jelly and an acid brush to take care of that. Beyond that, I just use a hand held brass brush to break up any built up saw dust, or anything like that.

Sharpening the irons for grooves, rabbets, and dadoes just like you would anything else, chisel, plane iron, etc. With the beading irons, I clean up the bevel side with an appropriately sized dowel rod with some sand paper wrapped around it. Try not to widen it at all though, as that effects the proportion of the flat to bead.

Otherwise, have some fun, #45 is one of my favorite planes to use, and was one of the first 5 hand planes I ever bought :-)

- Mosquito


Will Naval Jelly damage the Nickel plating on it?

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

View Mosquito's profile (online now)

Mosquito

8111 posts in 1757 days


#7 posted 09-19-2016 05:15 PM

It hasn’t on any of the ones I’ve used it on. I don’t leave it on for long though, so I can’t say what it would do over night or something like that. I leave it on for around 5-10 minute, and that’s it.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Marn64's profile

Marn64

209 posts in 251 days


#8 posted 09-21-2016 10:19 PM

A new question; would it be wrong to sand the tote and knob and finish it with shellac instead of lacquer, I personally like the feel of shellac handles better but my hands can tolerate whats left of the original lacquer if removing it would severely damage the value.

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

View ki7hy's profile

ki7hy

493 posts in 204 days


#9 posted 09-21-2016 10:36 PM

Marn…value is a funny word. I personally think you should sand it down and put the shellac on if that is better for you. The plane you have, we all have, isn’t really holding much “value” seeing as it’s like $100 – $150 to own one with a full set of cutters and is in the 100 year old range. Mine is 100 years old (type 12) and I bought it for $130. I won’t be retiring with the sales proceeds on any of my old Stanley planes. The real value is that you get years of enjoyment using the plane so spray paint it bright orange, color the handles, or hold open a door with it. As long as you enjoy it you get the value you want from it.

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

17967 posts in 2033 days


#10 posted 09-21-2016 11:44 PM

^I agree.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View Mosquito's profile (online now)

Mosquito

8111 posts in 1757 days


#11 posted 09-21-2016 11:58 PM

I third that. I prefer Shellac as well, and hate it when I get a plane that looks like it’s been dipped in lacquer, runs and all

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

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