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Enduro-Var Gloss

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Forum topic by Gerald Thompson posted 09-17-2016 08:23 PM 311 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1697 days


09-17-2016 08:23 PM

So far I have sprayed two coats of Enduro-Var gloss on a test cherry board. It was sanded with 220 as directed and wiped clean. I sanded the first coat after 2.5 hours with 320 as directed and wiped clean.
The second coat is now curing and I will probably shoot #3 in the morning. They recommend 3 coats. I plan on shooting a couple of more coats to make sure all is well protected.
My question is, does this product “melt” into itself as does lacquer as an example? I ask because I plan on rubbing it out to satin when all is cured. I do not want witness lines.
I got a pint of gloss because that was the smallest can they had at the time and have never used this product before.

-- Jerry


7 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#1 posted 09-18-2016 01:21 PM

My reply would a most definite “maybe”. Generally waterborne finishes work a lot different than evaporative finishes. The wat evaporates, letting th acrylic resins to touch and adhere. With most, if you spray the next coat before this process is complete, the subsequent coat will slightly soften the previous one, and they will “burn in” (for lack of a better description). But Enduro Var is a different class, as I understand it it’s an oil-modified waterborne. This has been described as a cross linking finish once exposed it’s to air (by General Finishes), similar to the way an oil based finish will cure. That being the case, I doubt you will see the merging of coats. The “maybe” part in my diatribe is because I’ve tried to learn more about the “oil modified” finishes and have mostly come up empty on any facts. I wouldn’t worry about it, it’s an excellent finish and very hard once cured. You have to rub the bejesus out of to get witness lines. Still, I would be interested in hearing the results once your done.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1697 days


#2 posted 09-18-2016 04:51 PM

I have three coats on now. I did not due a good job of spraying due to my inexperience. I have found out how to remedy that and will proceed with a new test piece soon.
The test piece I have now I am going to let cure until this coming weekend and then see what happens when I try to rub it out. I will let you know how it came out and post pics if I can.

-- Jerry

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Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1697 days


#3 posted 09-20-2016 02:38 AM

Enduro Var Polishing Schedule
By: Jeff Jewitt

Day 1….

1). Prep wood to 220 grit
2). Spray full wet coat of Enduro Var Gloss- allow 2 hours dry time
3). Level sand 320- spray a second coat full wet coat-wait 2 hours-light hand sand 320
4). Full wet coat—-allow to dry overnight

Day 2…..

5). Level sand with 320….wipe down with water mixed with 5% Denatured Alcohol
6). Spray full wet coat… 2-3 mils allow 1 hour dry time and repeat for a total of 3 coats with 1 hour between coats.

Let dry 1 week.
Level sand dry with Mirka P800
Sand dry with P1200 Mirka
Sand dry with 2000 grit Mirka Abralon

(Note- Do not use any lubricants of any type for sanding)

Final: 3M Finesse-It Material on a foam buffing pad to high gloss

I wonder if one could not go the other direction and make it satin?
According to GF the coats do not become one as lacquer does. It would seem if the last coat is thick witness lines would no likely happen.
I may just sat to hell with it and by a can of satin.
I will still play around with it when it cures more.

-- Jerry

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Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#4 posted 09-20-2016 11:03 AM

I have the deepest respect for Jeff and his knowledge, but he does sell the stuff you listed. Regardless, any high gloss finish can be made to have less sheen with rubbing. I would think using some automotive rubbing compound, pumice, rottenstone and so on would all reduce the sheen if that’s the goal. I agree about with the statement about the last coat, you’re not likely to have witness lines. Back to the satin thing, if you have anything but a flat surface where you want to reduce the sheen you might be better off buying some satin. It’s hard to get all the nooks and crannies of say, complicated moldings and things like that.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1697 days


#5 posted 09-20-2016 12:45 PM

After all is said and done I do believe I will go with satin. I have however, through other’s comments, learned a great deal and I thank everyone.

-- Jerry

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Gerald Thompson

808 posts in 1697 days


#6 posted 09-22-2016 10:18 PM

I rubbed out the gloss today. I used pumice, mineral oil and a felt erasure. The finish went satin quickly. No witness lines.
I have applied three coats of satin to the other side of the board. It has dried over 24 hrs. I used a foam brush to apply it and it looks great. I do not plan on spaying this product.
The rubbed gloss is just a tad less shiny than the satin.
Than is the news for the home front.

-- Jerry

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3935 posts in 1956 days


#7 posted 09-23-2016 11:01 AM

Sounds like one or the other is satisfactory. I’ve not tried brushing it, but may give a go based on your experience.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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