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Help identify a block plane?

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Forum topic by startingfromscratch posted 06-17-2010 12:41 AM 2847 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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startingfromscratch

69 posts in 2656 days


06-17-2010 12:41 AM

Hey all,
I was given this block plane last night by a neighbor that’s moving overseas and was cleaning out his workshop. I believe it’s a stanley…but I could be wrong. I’ve done a fair bit of googling and come up empty. Any help?

http://i.imgur.com/Jc2Qk.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/Tyr0u.jpg


5 replies so far

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blackcherry

3313 posts in 3286 days


#1 posted 06-17-2010 12:59 AM

It hard to say for sure, generally on the sides stanley stamps the no. size also on the blade you’ll find marking. Craftsmen has identical ones with no markings. Hope it a old stanley great block plane the craftsmen are useless. Take some wet dry paper with mineral spirits and clean some of the gum off you will find marking if it a Stanley.

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startingfromscratch

69 posts in 2656 days


#2 posted 06-17-2010 03:49 AM

Yeah, took your advice and gave it a once over. The blade is stamped Stanley 9 1/2 (13-029a). This is my first and only block plane. I’m pretty happy right about now…seems like a good piece to for me to learn how to tune and use a block plane, no?

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swirt

2117 posts in 2435 days


#3 posted 06-17-2010 03:10 PM

Here is some info on the Stanley 9 1/2.
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan2.htm

My guess is that the knob on the iron cap is not original. I haven’t seen a design that has a knob in the middle of the cap like that. I think someone lost the original cap iron screw and replaced it with a front knob from another plane. (just a guess).

Either way, it should clean up to be a good plane if the mouth adjuster works and you can get the blade sharp.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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startingfromscratch

69 posts in 2656 days


#4 posted 06-23-2010 04:41 PM

Yeah, still trying to get a handle on what this plane is…I have googled the crap out of “13-029a” and have come up with very little. It bugs me a little that there is nothing on the plan (other than the blade) that says stanley.

I didn’t find these:
http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/stanley-block-plane-9-1-2-1
http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/stanley-9-1-2-wood-plane-must-see

I also found this posting…which seems to be someone asking the exact questions I am asking about the same type plane (another “13-092a”): http://swingleydev.com/archive/get.php?message_id=19478

This is precisely what the plane I was given looks like…but I can only find reference to it on one single website. Is this weird? Are there a bazillion different kinds of stanley block planes out there so one could reasonably come across one that was limited in production? Or, is it common for blades to be interchangable, so the body of this block plane is God only knows what and just the blade is a stanley?

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swirt

2117 posts in 2435 days


#5 posted 06-23-2010 05:59 PM

Okay so after seeing those. I take back what I said about the knob on the cap iron.

You have a 9 1/2. That is the main description of your plane. The 13-029a is just a variation of some kind. Stanley made just about every kind of plane that could be dreamed up and like any active company they made “improvements” to their design … some turned out to be improvements and some turned out to be a bad idea. The designs changed a bit over time. The key is looking at what features yours has and what it doesn’t have.

The screw elevator in the back was added after the early 1880’s. The handigrip dimples in the side were added in 1895 so your plane is at least.

From the pictures, yours seems to lack a lateral adjustment lever …. either it is broken off or was never on. They first appeared on the block planes in the late 1890’s So if yours never had one, that would peg yours at after 1895 (due to the dimples) but before 1900 (due to the lack of a lateral adjuster).

The cam that adjusts the mouth was patented in 1894.

I’m afraid I don’t know when they used the brass knob on the cap. Nailing that date down would probably be the key to nailing down when your plane was made.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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