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Painting a maple step stool

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Forum topic by efsavage posted 06-16-2010 02:28 PM 1334 views 0 times favorited 1 reply Add to Favorites Watch
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efsavage

26 posts in 1906 days


06-16-2010 02:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: maple paint

I’ve made a step stool out of maple, and want to paint it. I planned on using a valspar canned spray enamel, but on my test piece I got some beading/clumping. I tried the same paint on some white pine and it was fine, so I’m assuming that I need to do something special with maple to get it to take paint. My first guess would be that I need to prime it, but I figured I should ask here before going on any wild goose chases :) Anyone have any recommendations?


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CharlesNeil

1170 posts in 2617 days


#1 posted 06-16-2010 04:54 PM

Usually maple paints well, not sure if you have some contamination, or exactly what , but a coat of primer will help, even a thin coat of shellac , then a light scuff sand with some 320 , or a spray can of simple “primer” like what is used on metal will do, a shellac or lacquer based primer is best, dries fast and seals well , you can put enamel over lacquer or shellac , but not the reverse… you may also try just wiping it down with some mineral spirits, and retry, enamel can be finicky about even minor surface contamination, it likes to “fisheye”, and all sorts of things, even the residue from your hands can cause issues, also when applying enamel, do a first light coat just a good dusting, after it tacks up , then go with wetter coats, the tack coat helps the enamel to bite into the surface a little also helps prevent runs, but don’t let it dry too much just enough its set up some but still tacky , when you spray the wet coat , it all melts together and levels out, enamel usually dries much slower than most finishes, so be sure to have clean area to spray it in , and patience to let it dry, a light scuff sand between coats with some 600 grit, helps give you a smoother finish

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