Replacing jointer feet with caster wheels?

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Forum topic by Dagobah posted 09-13-2016 04:51 PM 645 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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22 posts in 81 days

09-13-2016 04:51 PM

I was watching this video where he mentions using 3/8” threaded casters on the bottom of his Ridgid jointer. He ends up making a stand, but I thought it was an interesting idea.

I’ve got the same jointer and end up dragging it around the garage every night. Amazon has multiple options ranging in price. The jointer is 220lbs total, plus the pressure I’d be applying to stock, so ideally 80lbs per caster min.

Has anyone has gone this route?

14 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile


720 posts in 640 days

#1 posted 09-13-2016 06:59 PM

I made a mobile base for my Jet 6”.
If I had it to do again, I’d do it differently.

My problem is even with locking casters, they still ‘wiggle’ around. I’d be better off replacing the two casters on one end with non-swivel wheels and the casters on the opposite end with feet.
To move it around, just lift the end with the feet, much like pushing around a wheelbarrow. When set back down, it should be stable.

View syenefarmer's profile


429 posts in 2498 days

#2 posted 09-13-2016 07:16 PM

The Ridgid 6” jointer is very top heavy. I would think that just putting casters on the stand legs would invite a tip over the first time the wheels hit an obstruction on the floor. You’d be better off putting the casters on a wider piece of plywood and then bolting the jointers legs to the plywood.

View BorkBob's profile


113 posts in 2110 days

#3 posted 09-13-2016 07:55 PM

My 8” jointer has built in tricycle wheels. I park it against a wall and it was a hassle to get it out in the open. I set it on I’m tall so the added height is not a problem.

-- Please Pray for Our Troops / Semper Fi / Bob Ross /

View MT_Stringer's profile


2818 posts in 2649 days

#4 posted 09-13-2016 08:00 PM

My 6 inch Jet came with a mobile base. Two casters are fixed and a third swivels. Yep, at times it can move around when I am working it hard.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Kirk650's profile


272 posts in 166 days

#5 posted 09-14-2016 01:18 AM

Everything in my workshop has wheels except for the jointer. I carefully chose where to put the jointer and have never had to move it. I do move other wheeled apparatus to allow room to use the jointer with long boards. I even had to open the front door one fall weekend to allow room to run 7 foot bed posts over the jointer.

View lennyk's profile


25 posts in 250 days

#6 posted 09-14-2016 01:26 AM

Have same 6” ridgid 200lb
i welded up a base out of 1 1/2” angle steel and put hf wheels on them. Two straight and two swivel.
The two straight are on the out feed side.
I usually just stick a piece of 1/2” rod under the wheels to jam them.

View Picken5's profile


220 posts in 2110 days

#7 posted 09-14-2016 03:52 AM

I’ve tried lockable casters a few times and they didn’t work for me. The tool rocked a bit which I found annoying. And sometimes one of the locking casters would come unlocked at inconvenient times. So I got a mobile base for my older 6” Delta jointer a few years back. No regrets at all. It installed easily and works great. If I recall, it was an HTC that was rated at 500 lbs. I think my jointer weighs about 250 lbs which is probably pretty close to what your Rigid jointer weighs.

-- Howard - "Time spent making sawdust is not deducted from one's lifetime." - old Scottish proverb

View Holbs's profile


1346 posts in 1447 days

#8 posted 09-14-2016 04:03 AM

i went mobile base. $55… was an easy decision.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

View lennyk's profile


25 posts in 250 days

#9 posted 09-14-2016 11:02 AM

wheels are great for everything, my stuff is all outdoors so every week I push everything aside and
hose down the floor.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile


1172 posts in 1528 days

#10 posted 09-14-2016 01:03 PM

A few wedges can lock anything in place, wheels or not…

Roll it into place, tap them in, nothing is going anywhere until you take them out.

View PaulHWood's profile


328 posts in 1671 days

#11 posted 09-14-2016 02:05 PM

I started with that and did not like it as the base is very flexible. I used a harbor freight kit, some steel tubing (stolen form another LJer), and a plywood base that I could bolt the jointer too.

-- -Paul, South Carolina Structural Engineer by trade, Crappy Woodworker by choice

View BinghamtonEd's profile


2263 posts in 1788 days

#12 posted 09-14-2016 02:12 PM

When I got my old 8” Yates jointer back to my garage, I put it on a HF furniture dolly as a temporary place until I made/purchased a mobile base for it. It still sits on that dolly, and I chock the wheels with scrap when I wheel it out for use.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View HokieKen's profile


1519 posts in 557 days

#13 posted 09-14-2016 03:32 PM

I made a “dolly” out of 2×4s and plywood and put double locking casters on it. Casters are great but the narrow footprint made it too unstable. So, I made some wedges that I put under the dolly when I’m using it and it works great.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View splintergroup's profile


720 posts in 640 days

#14 posted 09-14-2016 08:21 PM

A few wedges can lock anything in place, wheels or not…

Roll it into place, tap them in, nothing is going anywhere until you take them out.

- OggieOglethorpe

I use some thin cutoff strips as wedges (about 1/4” x 1/4” triangle). It works, but a major hassle. A swing-down wedge or other movement stopping device would be better. If it isn’t convenient to use, I find myself not using it.

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