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Moving a SawStop PCS and Hammer A3-31 in a UHaul trailer

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Forum topic by Matt Przybylski posted 09-12-2016 01:12 AM 617 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1843 days


09-12-2016 01:12 AM

I’m moving cross country and have decided that the best way to move these two machines is in a UHaul with a low deck hitched to my Ram 1500 truck. I’m facing a few issues and would like to discuss them (read: get reassurance that I’m not crazy or going to completely destroy my machines). The SawStop is roughly 350lbs and the A3-31 is 530lbs.

I was thinking of buying a winch, hooking it up somewhere in the trailer, then wrapping slings around my machines and connecting them to the winch. Is this a good/bad idea?

Secondly, I was going to buy an aluminum ramp (something like this: http://www.discountramps.com/ez-acesstrifold_ramp/p/Trifold-AS/). My worry is the wheels on the SawStop are not that high (nor are the great lakes casters on my A3-31) so, with a 5’ variant of that ramp, and I asking for trouble and scratching the bottom of the machines? I don’t even know how feasible it is for the machines to start going up the ramp properly. How would you make the transition from solid ground to start of ramp so as not to wreak havoc?

I had considered using my 1 ton hoist to lift the machines into the trailer but a UHaul has a 4’10” opening and I’m not sure with everything attached if clearances will be a problem. I need to get all of this correctly set up on the first try because we’re closing on our house right after I plan to move these machines out and I may not have a lot of time to come up with a secondary plan if something fails.

Also of note is that at my destination I will not have as much help as I will here when loading (probably only one other person) so it’s critical that I am able to safely get the machines off of the trailer and into the new house as well. Please keep that in mind when making suggestions.

I feel like I’m in a bit of a tricky situation. I don’t have experience moving heavy machinery and I’ve always gotten help getting the machines into my garage. With the limitations of the UHaul trailer size I feel even more pressured and I can’t tell if I’m just completely overthinking this whole thing or if my worries are valid.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com


10 replies so far

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MrUnix

4234 posts in 1664 days


#1 posted 09-12-2016 01:31 AM

Hand truck and a couple people can move those pretty easily – they aren’t all that heavy. Make sure you strap them down well once in the trailer. And I hope you are getting a covered trailer :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1843 days


#2 posted 09-12-2016 01:35 AM

The trailer will be covered, yes. The hand truck I have is too high for the trailer :\ I suppose I could get another though, would probably be cheaper than having to buy a winch, though not by much if I bought at HF.

Also I’m afraid I won’t be able to get the Hammer A3-31 on a hand truck, its much higher sitting now on the casters off the ground.

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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Redoak49

1953 posts in 1454 days


#3 posted 09-12-2016 01:45 AM

Could you use an engine lift to pick them up and put in trailer. I have used my HF 2 ton engine lift to move equipment and put on trailer. With the arm, you could put things in the trailer.

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bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#4 posted 09-12-2016 01:47 AM

If you have a truck, I’d put them in the bed, save money, mileage and tolls. My bigger jointer is ~1375lbs. without a motor and I’ve moved it twice, once with a utility trailer and once in the back of my Dodge Dakota. It was much easier without the trailer.

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Matt Przybylski

528 posts in 1843 days


#5 posted 09-12-2016 01:50 AM

@Redoak49: I have the 1 ton lift and I’m worried that the clearance of the tool + slings + hoist will not make it between the 4’10” opening of the cargo trailer and then I’ll be stuck trying to figure out how to get the tool in there with very little time and will probably be super stressed.

@bigblockyeti: I’d still have to figure out how to get the tools up onto the bed of my truck which is MUCH higher (20” wheels) than that of the trailer. Then I’d have to find a way to cover them (plus everything else) on a 2+ day trip and hope nobody steals anything while I’m sleeping. :)

-- Matt, Illinois, http://www.reintroducing.com

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MrUnix

4234 posts in 1664 days


#6 posted 09-12-2016 01:52 AM

The hand truck I have is too high for the trailer : I suppose I could get another though, would probably be cheaper than having to buy a winch, though not by much if I bought at HF.
- Matt Przybylski

I don’t see what the problem is if you got that ramp you were talking about… or even just using a couple of 2×10’s or 2×12’s as a ramp. Lots of ways to move those machines, and not many of them involve a lot of money – just a little creativity.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

185 posts in 1680 days


#7 posted 09-12-2016 02:13 AM

It may not work for you, but when I’m loading equipment in and out of trailers, I use the rise of my driveway to help the height difference. I’ll hitch the trailer to the truck and back up so the wheels of the trailer are right at the end of the driveway. Depending on the trailer length and it’s hitch height, I can reduce the 16 to 18 inch height difference to just a few inches. The smaller height difference and lower ramp angles just make things easier overall.

My neighbor and I have loaded and unloaded some fairly heavy items off of trailers like this that we definitely couldn’t have probably pushed up a steeper ramp.

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1342 posts in 2479 days


#8 posted 09-12-2016 03:15 AM

Matt, I would first take off any wings off the table saw. Then I would make sleds upon which I would attach the table saw or A3-32.

This is How I would build the base of the sled for the table saw.

This is the complete sled with a 3/4 inch thick plywood top.

Next I would bolt each machine to their respective sleds. You can attach 2 metal attachment points to the sleds so you can attach the cable/hook of your winch. You can figure out the details.

Now you can just drag it up the ramp or better yet, use lengths of pipe under the sleds to make it easier to take it up the ramp you plan to use. I’d use about 4 or 5 lengths of pipe. Put 3 under the sled and add the extra pipes as needed as the sled moves along.

You may consider putting the 2 X 4 cross pieces near the ends so you can slip a 2 X 4 under the sled and use it to lift the heavy sled up and slip the pipes under the sled runners.

Hope this gives you another idea on how you can do the job.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

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MikesProjects

163 posts in 1367 days


#9 posted 09-12-2016 05:46 AM

I made a 8’ ramp out of 2×4’s & plywood to move a sawstop & jointer. I kept the ramp, it comes in handy from time to time. Just take it easy over rough roads & consider renting a few moving pads from uhaul. They come in handy, you cant have enough, 20 sounds about right.

-- -Mike, Southern California, YouTube User ( Give & Take )

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

819 posts in 386 days


#10 posted 09-12-2016 11:28 AM

Matt Przybylski,

One option to consider is to contact some local moving companies and arrange for professional movers to load and unload the machines. I went this this route when moving a number of heavy shop machines, including a PM66 table saw, from a walk out basement up a hill into the home’s garage.

The second option is to consider renting piano dollies from a local equipment rental store. They are a pair of short 2-wheeled dollies. One dolly is placed at one end of the machine and the other dolly is placed at the other end of the machine. The dollies are then strapped together and against the machine. Once strapped in place, the machine should have greater ground clearance. Some blocking under the machine and that sets atop the dolly shoe would provide a little more ground clearance, if needed. A big advantage of the piano dollies is that they lift from the bottom where the machines are designed to carry weight.

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