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Good router for inlay

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Forum topic by paphman posted 06-15-2010 12:18 AM 7678 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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paphman

21 posts in 2389 days


06-15-2010 12:18 AM

I do not have a router, and would like to do some inlay work. My question is what would make good router for this project? Money is not a huge item here, because I will not be needing alot of bits, I don’t think, so I can put that money into a better router. Thanks

Dale


16 replies so far

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7224 posts in 2843 days


#1 posted 06-15-2010 12:27 AM

Hi Dale – I use a plunge router. Something small and light is probably best. Hitachi, Milwaukee, PC, DW, Makita, Craftsman, Ridgid, Freud, or Triton should all work well for you. Get the one that feels best in your hands.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8262 posts in 2896 days


#2 posted 06-15-2010 12:31 AM

This would work.
Trend
There’s also a router type base for a Dremel.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2390 days


#3 posted 06-15-2010 02:09 AM

Gene, you’re right about the Trend(T4) for inlay. My first experience with Trend was disappointing however they (Trend) made things right and I’m happy to says their router works really good for all my inlay work.

Paphman if you decide on a Trend make sure the date on the router is later than 2008 and if your warranty card says return to New Jersey..get on the net and get their new address. Other than that you would be very happy with one.

-- Life is good.

View Tony Strupulis's profile

Tony Strupulis

259 posts in 2590 days


#4 posted 06-15-2010 02:48 AM

I like my Veritas large router plane (Stanley 71?). It has three different blades. I also like my Lie-Nielsen 271 small router plane along with their inlay tools.

-- Tony - http://ravensedgetoolworks.com

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2762 days


#5 posted 06-15-2010 03:12 AM

I have done some inlay work with my Dremel.
I find for intricate inlay work a trim router and the Dremel work best.
The collet sizes are much smaller 1/16” (sold separately) on the Dremel
so you can use finer bits.
Stewart-MacDonald sells a precision router base for the Dremel,
this is my next purchase. I guess your needs depend on what size
inlays you plan on doing as to what will work best for you.

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View sandt38's profile

sandt38

166 posts in 2375 days


#6 posted 06-15-2010 03:42 AM

I don’t mean to disagree, but I watched the Wood Whisperer’s video about inlaying with a router.

http://lumberjocks.com/thewoodwhisperer/blog/14924#comment-639663

It is a very long video, but it taught me a lot.

He suggested using a heavier router, as lighter routers tend to snag the grain and due to less mass, they go with the grain. He said he finds heavier routers don’t get dragged along as easily, and they are simply easier to manipulate as you don’t have to worry about it getting away from you.

After watching his video, I have to ask those of you using lighter routers and dremels, how do you feel about this, and why do you elect to use lighter routers? I was thinking about using my monstrous DeWalt DW625, but if there is a reason to go lighter, I am all ears as well…

-- Got Wood? --- Somewhere along the way the people in Washington forgot that they are there to represent the people, not to rule them.

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2762 days


#7 posted 06-15-2010 04:14 AM

Yes I agree.
The smaller light weight routers will snag if forced through the wood.
I have found that you need to go at the work slower and with shallower cuts.
The smaller bits don’t bit out as much wood as a larger bits.
If you go slow and steady letting the smaller bit do it’s work, it won’t snag.
Smaller is easier to handle for fine work.
I don’t believe you can put a fine bit in a monstrous router the collets are too big.
That’s my experience ….

Lisa

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2390 days


#8 posted 06-15-2010 04:34 AM

I use the Trend because of its plunge feature.
I’m with dustbunny.
Besides the big routers make it too hard to see what you are doing.

-- Life is good.

View sandt38's profile

sandt38

166 posts in 2375 days


#9 posted 06-15-2010 04:55 AM

I understand where you guys are coming from.

Dustbunny, they do make collet reducers that can be had for ~$10 ;-)

-- Got Wood? --- Somewhere along the way the people in Washington forgot that they are there to represent the people, not to rule them.

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 2526 days


#10 posted 06-15-2010 05:06 AM

For most any router work, it is hard to beat a good old Porter Cable 690 router. Big enough and powerful enough without being too heavy. Plunge base is a plus. Very dependable and reliable tool.

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View paphman's profile

paphman

21 posts in 2389 days


#11 posted 06-15-2010 05:36 PM

Thanks for all the advice. I like the Dremel idea. I have a Dremel tool now that I have used to death on our sailboat. I think it is a great tool if used with care. I changed out the chuck that came with it, and put on the one that looks and works like a nornal drill chuck. It goes from 1/8” down to 1/16” and very easy to use. I also looked at the Trend T-4 and that to looked nice. When would that be used in place of the Dremel? I will be ordering the Dremel base from Stewart-Macdonald. That looked great. Has anyone used their router bits for Dremels? They also liked like they would be the ticket. I love this site. It is very helpfull to a new guy like me. Thanks again

Dale

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2718 posts in 2753 days


#12 posted 06-15-2010 06:38 PM

I have used my Dremel routing for small hinges on a box. I thought it was way underpowered—even for that.
I was using their router bits. I guess it would be OK for very small inlays, but I would consider something bigger.

I really like my Bosch Colt routers. The down side is not having a plunge base. It is a little award to get started.
There is enough power and still have control.

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

View paphman's profile

paphman

21 posts in 2389 days


#13 posted 06-15-2010 10:13 PM

I have come across another possible router. Many have said the Trend T 4 is a nice one for inlay work, and it is on sale now for $99.00. While looking at this I found a small plunge router from Proxxon. The price on that router is about the same as the Trend on sale. Does anyone have anything to say about the Proxxon tool. I had never even heard of that company before, but the product looks nice as well. Thanks

Dale

View Clarence's profile

Clarence

125 posts in 2573 days


#14 posted 06-16-2010 12:37 AM

Stewart-McDonald also sells a Foredom handpiece to fit the Dremel plunge base.

-- Getting old is a good thing, but being old kinda stinks.

View paphman's profile

paphman

21 posts in 2389 days


#15 posted 06-16-2010 04:21 AM

Well I made the buy. I bought the Trend T4. I would like to thank again everyone that answered my question. It made it very easy for me. This is a great site!

Dale

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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