LumberJocks

How to Bend Wood to Make Furniture

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Grumpy posted 09-10-2016 11:13 PM 397 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21569 posts in 3317 days


09-10-2016 11:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig clamp tablesaw shaping bending

From a ‘Pintrest’ article
One reservation I have is the way he moves the tablesaw fence each time.
.

.

http://vid.staged.com/w4Qs

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python


8 replies so far

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

5243 posts in 1509 days


#1 posted 09-11-2016 01:38 PM

Interesting. I’ve done it a similar way for a project once.

-- Dave, Downers Grove, Il. -------- When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#2 posted 09-12-2016 12:41 AM

A ripping sled would simplify and speed up the ripping of the 1/8” strips. Would be safer, too. Once you’ve measured for the first cut, all subsequent cuts require no more measuring or shifting of the fence.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#3 posted 09-12-2016 01:06 AM

Pretty standard bent lamination… much stronger than cutting the shape out of a solid piece of wood, particularly when there are a lot of curves involved. I’ve made several sailboat tillers the same way, as well as a water ski back when I was in woodshop in high school – although epoxy was used instead of wood glue so it was waterproof. Never tried making the strips with a sled… I just have a simple homemade thin-rip jig that I can use on either the table saw or band saw. You still have to move the fence, but it doesn’t require using the measuring tape and all the pieces come out exactly the same width every time.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Don’t do many bent laminations these days, but the thin rip jig is great for making thin strips for inlays, borders and other decorative features on other projects.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21569 posts in 3317 days


#4 posted 09-12-2016 03:27 AM

Yes Brad, I agree with the thin rip jig.
I just use a magswitch and fit it into a small wooden block, you can position it anywhere on the metal surface (ferous). don’t need to rely on the guide slot.
.
http://magswitch.com.au/product/magswitch-magjig-95/

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#5 posted 09-12-2016 03:43 AM

Yes Brad, I agree with the thin rip jig.
I just use a magswitch and fit it into a small wooden block, you can position it anywhere on the metal surface (ferous). don t need to rely on the guide slot.
- Grumpy

I really like those little mag switches… except the price :)
I went the cheap (as in free) way with scrap wood, an old bearing and some scrounged hardware::

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#6 posted 09-12-2016 03:46 AM

A ripping sled is not the same as a thin rip jig. Repeat: you don’t have to move the fence, once it’s set, with a ripping sled.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#7 posted 09-12-2016 03:53 AM

A ripping sled is not the same as a thin rip jig. Repeat: you don t have to move the fence, once it s set, with a ripping sled.
- runswithscissors

As mentioned, never tried one… can you post an example? And how would you use it for long stock? Always interested in a new way of doing stuff :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#8 posted 09-12-2016 04:24 AM

Almost 2 years ago, I did a post called “Thin strip ripping jig for TS.” Type that in to the search box. Yes, I called it a jig then, not a sled, but it really is a sled in that it follows the wood all the way through the cut. There are photos.

I made mine about 4’ long, as that’s all I needed at the time. Obviously you wouldn’t want it too long—not over 6’ I would think. But I expect most laminations, especially using really thin strips, are not all that long.

That thing works really well, and is very quick to use as the fence doesn’t have to be moved for each cut. 1/16” thick strips are no problem at all for it. Hands are always well away from the blade.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com