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Radial Arm Saw Issues Update

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Forum topic by LoyalAppleGeek posted 09-10-2016 03:53 AM 505 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LoyalAppleGeek

120 posts in 356 days


09-10-2016 03:53 AM

Topic tags/keywords: ras table saw radial arm update new completed done craftsman

Greetings and salutations LumberJocks!

This is an update regarding the topic I posted a couple days ago about my new radial arm saw.

Thanks to your great help, she’s fully functional and… WOW. As I stated earlier, she only had 10 hours of use, and I got her from the first owner. After I washed and decreased the storage grime, a BRAND NEW machine was looking back at me. She cleaned up not just better than I thought she would, but literally looks like she was freshly assembled from the box. The previous owner, my awesome neighbor, took absolutely impeccable care of this beautiful machine.

I finished the new table last night, and I’m super happy with it. Dead flat to the thickness of a sheet of paper, and waxed. It’s fully aligned and the dust shroud and table clamp are going in soon.

And of course, what’s an RAS without Mossy Oak Trim? Since I won’t rip with this saw, the scale isn’t of any use to me. Not only that, but the camo just fits in here, it gives it that feel that’s just more like “me”.

A chuck for the accessory drive is in the mail, I’ll be building a drill press jig, as well as doing a LOT of router work with it.

Thank you again to everyone for the helpful responses, I look forward to coming back soon :-)

Take care,

Loyal Apple Geek


10 replies so far

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1046 days


#1 posted 09-10-2016 04:55 AM

How did you determine the gender of a radial arm saw?
.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

624 posts in 1414 days


#2 posted 09-10-2016 11:23 AM



How did you determine the gender of a radial arm saw?
.

- jimintx

These days YOU do not determine the gender of the radial arm saw. The saw decides what gender it feels like being today and acts accordingly.

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

3932 posts in 1955 days


#3 posted 09-10-2016 12:50 PM


These days YOU do not determine the gender of the radial arm saw. The saw decides what gender it feels like being today and acts accordingly.

- Kazooman

ROTFLMAO!!!! good one…..

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View LoyalAppleGeek's profile

LoyalAppleGeek

120 posts in 356 days


#4 posted 09-10-2016 03:18 PM

You know, I’m not sure LOL. I’ve never heard anyone call their car “he”, accept for in Herbie. There’s something about machinery that just always gets called “she”. Perhaps it’s because our tools are what you take care of, protect, and value if you’re single :-)

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 382 days


#5 posted 09-10-2016 08:40 PM

LoyalAppleGeek,

Congratulation! It sounds like not only is your neighbor a good guy, but you must be a good neighbor also.

I never thought of using the radial arm saw as a router. I can see how for certain cuts the radial arm saw could be the perfect tool for the job. I would be interested in learning how the router set-up works out.

There are a couple things I did to my radial arm saw that have worked well for me. I mention them in case you might be interested.

Since the front table gets pretty chewed up over time and I so dislike replacing the table, covering the table with ¼” tempered hardboard which I screwed in place, is the route I took. I covered my front table with three separate pieces of hardboard, one on the left side of the table, one on the right side and a center removable/replaceable sliding insert. The left and right sides were cut at a 45 degree bevel along one edge. Several center inserts were also cut with the same 45 degree bevel. With the right and left sections of the hardboard installed the center insert slides into place, held in position by the bevels and a single screw at the front edge of the table. Since my radial arm stays at 90 degrees, I can easily refresh the table by replacing the center insert. I covered the back tables with one piece of hardboard just in case I every need to reconfigure the fence. Of course if the radial arm is swung to cut a mitre, care is required to avoid ruining the blade by cutting into a screw.

The second problem I encountered was saw dust accumulating at the base of the fence, which would throw off my cuts. My solution was to cut a few short and narrow pieces of ¼” hardboard that were glued along the table’s edge where the fence locks into place. The resulting gaps allow dust to fall through the spaces created the by hardboard stand-off strips. Since the strips are glued to the table’s edge, replacing the fence is easily done.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#6 posted 09-10-2016 09:31 PM

Sears used to market those saws as a do-everything machine, although not everything it could do was done well :) I have the same RAS, and while it could possibly be used as a single speed drill press, that would be a painfully slow operation to perform. A dedicated drill press would be much, much more convenient and quicker. A drum sander might be a good use for the drill chuck on the RAS though. As for router work? Given the speed of the arbor, that would be way too slow to use as a router IMO. Although I’ve seen plenty of people who removed the saw motor and replaced them with a router to make it into an overarm router table.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View LoyalAppleGeek's profile

LoyalAppleGeek

120 posts in 356 days


#7 posted 09-11-2016 03:32 AM

JBrow: He is, and I sure try to be :-) As you saw in my first post regarding this topic, he gave much more than most people who you get free stuff from. Lots of aftermarket accessories with all hardware and parts present, in original packaging! As you may know, usually free tools come with a substantial amount of missing parts that really put a damper on the excitement of getting them. The only thing missing was a 5/16 T-nut, of which I had one more from my last project since I purchased an extra “just in case I need it down the road” :-)

I’ll be posting the results of the router and drill usage when the chuck arrives, and I’ll likely be looking for design inspiration for the jigs.

I am very interested in your tricks! I really appreciate you sharing them. Do you have any photos? I would love to see what you described, although your written description was actually very easy to understand. I solved the dust issue by putting a small chamfer along the back of the front table that meets the fence. Then I can just blow it out after a few cuts. Since the chamfer is on the table, like your slats are, the fence is easily replaced.

Brad: I have a shop built drill press with a 17” throat depth and 12” of plung that I’ve been working on and use regularly. One thing it doesn’t do is concentric drilling, something an RAS does well with a simple jig. Most of my router work to be done is with carbide bits under 1/2”, which I seem to be able to get away with running at lower speeds :-) A drum sander is on my list for the future, I really look forward to the accessory builds coming up for this saw, I’ll post them as their completed :-)

Thank again!

View Harryn's profile

Harryn

34 posts in 2050 days


#8 posted 09-12-2016 02:59 PM

Always use a negative hook saw blade for sawing on a radial saw. Table saw blades have a positive tooth hook angle. On a radial saw this can cause the saw to grab and shoot forward. Unsafe! What’s a negative angle? If you draw a line from the center to the tooth, a positive has the tooth leaning forward from the line. A negative leans backward.

View LoyalAppleGeek's profile

LoyalAppleGeek

120 posts in 356 days


#9 posted 09-13-2016 08:47 PM



Always use a negative hook saw blade for sawing on a radial saw. Table saw blades have a positive tooth hook angle. On a radial saw this can cause the saw to grab and shoot forward. Unsafe! What s a negative angle? If you draw a line from the center to the tooth, a positive has the tooth leaning forward from the line. A negative leans backward.

- Harryn

Thanks for sharing Harryn! I’m already aware of that fact and have my saw set up accordingly. Thank you for sharing, as then anyone else who views this thread will be made aware. Thanks for looking out for my safety! :-)

View John's profile

John

166 posts in 1043 days


#10 posted 09-13-2016 09:06 PM

I’m jealous of your neighbor. The only thing I get from mine is weeds in the lawn, unkempt bushes to look at, and the smell of pot smoke. I’d much rather have a RAS. Hahaha
Glad it worked out for you. That the best price for a like new tool.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

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