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Coffee table apron crack

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Forum topic by JimBress posted 09-08-2016 03:47 AM 347 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JimBress

5 posts in 87 days


09-08-2016 03:47 AM

Hi Folks, I’ve been a lurker here for a while as I learn to use hand tools and starting to make furniture for the house. I learned a lot from you folks, but now I am in a fix. About a month ago I came across some nice wood, Sapele and leopard wood and decided to make a coffee table with it. I finished the table top and frame. Unfortunately I didn’t notice a crack in the side apron until after I stained it with Watco Danish Oil. I tried flexing the board and there is no movement in the crack. Any suggestions on how I can repair the crack instead of replacing the apron?

Thanks,
Jim


17 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

687 posts in 1259 days


#1 posted 09-08-2016 04:33 AM

Since the crack is mostly cross grain.You should remake the part.
The crack is not fixable.

Aj

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 123 days


#2 posted 09-08-2016 05:48 AM

Here is what I would do, on the back side run a piece or wood about 8” long, by about an 1” less then the width of the apron, 3/4” thick, flush with the top of the apron piece, and put 3 or 4 screws on each side of the crack. Then fill the crack on the exposed side with a wood putty that matches the color.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 947 days


#3 posted 09-08-2016 05:53 AM

I’d say about the same but I’d scrape the finish off and glue it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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nightguy

213 posts in 123 days


#4 posted 09-08-2016 06:52 AM



I d say about the same but I d scrape the finish off and glue it.

- TheFridge

I thought of that too, it would not be a bad addition, better over kill then under.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#5 posted 09-08-2016 12:37 PM

I would replace that board, you are never going to be happy with a scab. It is not fixable.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

817 posts in 381 days


#6 posted 09-08-2016 12:59 PM

JimBress,

I doubt the crack will cause problems down the road. Therefore leaving it is alone is a viable option. There appears to be some intact wood in the rail below the crack and the rail and top appear to be fairly thick. If someone were to sit on the table directly over the crack, the downward forces would be largely distributed by the top. The crack would compress. I assume the top overhangs the rails by some distance, which would make the crack less visible.

But if repairing the crack is a must, then Option 1 would be to replace the rail; a job I would not want to undertake. Option 2 is offered by nightguy, a scab. This is probably the strongest repair. Option 3 would be to install pocket screws that would span the crack. I would think installing one pocket screw from left to right and the second pocket screw in the opposite direction, right to left, would provide the greatest support.

View Halc's profile

Halc

127 posts in 1063 days


#7 posted 09-08-2016 01:06 PM

You might consider attaching a piece of angle iron to the back side of the apron piece. You can get them about 1.5” x 1.5” with holes and slots in them. Get the longest one that will fit the length of the apron, or buy one longer and cut it to the exact length and use screws to attach it. If the top of the angle iron is flush with the top edge of the apron you won’t see it. It should stabilize the apron and hold unless you’re going to be dancing on top of the table.

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JimBress

5 posts in 87 days


#8 posted 09-08-2016 05:28 PM

Thank you all for your help. My initial thought was to inset a piece of steal bar stock to the top of the apron and screw it in. I wanted to find a repair for this instead of replacing the apron because the apron was still structurally sound enough that I could not get the crack to move by flexing the board in any direction. I went with the early morning advise and hadn’t been on the board after 6am. After scraping and sanding the area I glued and screwed an 18” support board out of the same material (leopard wood). I chose the length by putting the crack in the middle of the board with one end butted to the leg. I think it looks nicer that way even if you will have to crawl under the table to see it. I don’t think the outside crack will be visible with 2” of overhang from the top and the two layers of shellac I will finish it off with.

Cheers,
Jim

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 947 days


#9 posted 09-08-2016 05:31 PM

good deal.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

270 posts in 304 days


#10 posted 09-12-2016 08:03 PM



Thank you all for your help. My initial thought was to inset a piece of steal bar stock to the top of the apron and screw it in. I wanted to find a repair for this instead of replacing the apron because the apron was still structurally sound enough that I could not get the crack to move by flexing the board in any direction. I went with the early morning advise and hadn t been on the board after 6am. After scraping and sanding the area I glued and screwed an 18” support board out of the same material (leopard wood). I chose the length by putting the crack in the middle of the board with one end butted to the leg. I think it looks nicer that way even if you will have to crawl under the table to see it. I don t think the outside crack will be visible with 2” of overhang from the top and the two layers of shellac I will finish it off with.

Cheers,
Jim

- JimBress

Nicely done. The glue alone would probably have done the job. Lots of surface area. But the screws are a good way to clamp a piece.

Tell the girlfriends not to dance on the table in the future. The aprons will last longer that way. :)

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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JimBress

5 posts in 87 days


#11 posted 09-12-2016 10:36 PM

Nicely done. The glue alone would probably have done the job. Lots of surface area. But the screws are a good way to clamp a piece.

Tell the girlfriends not to dance on the table in the future. The aprons will last longer that way. :)

- Cooler

The screws were great for locating the board, and probably over kill. The screws alone didn’t have the clamping power to cause glue squeeze out. That surprised me. The main reason I used the screws, and a lot of them, is because even though I scraped and sanded I still had doubts on how much the danish oil application would affect the adhesion of the glue.

-Jim

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Woodchuck2010

504 posts in 319 days


#12 posted 09-12-2016 10:55 PM

You definitely fixed it. I’d have done a couple of pocket hole screws.

-- Chuck, Michigan,

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 123 days


#13 posted 09-12-2016 10:59 PM

The screws may not have pulled tight if you did not have the hole in the scab piece larger then the thread diameter.

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

687 posts in 1259 days


#14 posted 09-12-2016 11:01 PM

Thats some nice looking wood.Good save.

Aj

View JimBress's profile

JimBress

5 posts in 87 days


#15 posted 09-12-2016 11:07 PM



The screws may not have pulled tight if you did not have the hole in the scab piece larger then the thread diameter.

- nightguy


Nope, screws slipped in and out of scab piece (new term for me), but there was a slight bow in the wood and this leopard wood is extremely dense (SG 0.97) and stiff. I sent a couple of the off cuts to an amateur bow (cello) maker to use as practice pieces.

-Jim

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