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Stanley 151 Spokeshave Missing Parts

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Forum topic by DylanC posted 09-07-2016 03:14 AM 325 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DylanC

196 posts in 2138 days


09-07-2016 03:14 AM

Topic tags/keywords: spokeshave 151 151m

I recently picked up a Stanley 151M at a flea market for $12. Seller wanted $20 but it is missing the thumbscrew that tightens the cap onto the iron. I figured it would be some off-the-wall thread, and I was right. Best I can figure is that it’s a #10-28 TPI, which hasn’t been in common use for decades. So, I’ve got a couple of options to make this thing complete and get it back into usable condition.

1. Buy a vintage replacement online. Probably in the $13 to $15 dollar range. I’m a bit leary of this because I think Stanley may have changed the thread TPI at some point. I say this because I have two Stanley 53s…the adjustment screw from one of the 53s is a perfect fit in the 151 cap, the other is not. I would hate to spend $13 dollars on one screw that doesn’t even fit.

2. Buy a 151 parts kit online for $20. Kit includes a new cap, cap screw, and both iron adjustment screws. If I go this route, I will have a new (poorly cast/machined) cap and matching screw.

3. Drill out the existing cap and tap it with a more common 1/4”-28 and use a standard socket head cap screw. This would almost be free, but I’d be destroying any “collectable” value to this shave, and I understand the 151M is perhaps a bit less common and more desirable than a standard 151.

4. Troll the ‘Bay until a broken 51 turns up for $10 and use it as a donor for a new cap and screw.

Any spokeshave aficionados care to weigh in and give me some much-needed advice?

-- Dylan C ...Seems like all ever I make is sawdust...


7 replies so far

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HokieKen

1752 posts in 602 days


#1 posted 09-07-2016 02:33 PM

I’d go for #3 but my shaves are strictly users, don’t give much concern to collector value. That being said, you can get a 10-28 die off eBay for less than you’re likely to get a broken 151 for. Get a 3/16 steel rod and make your own bolt.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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DylanC

196 posts in 2138 days


#2 posted 09-08-2016 01:58 AM



...you can get a 10-28 die off eBay…Get a 3/16 steel rod and make your own bolt.

- HokieKen

I looked at something like this today. It turns out that #10-28 is VERY close to the metric M5×0.9, which is an old JIS standard that became obsolete in the mid-60’s. BUT we have a tap and die set where I work that has this size in it. I tested it out today on some 3/16” rod and it worked. My plan is to buy a 1/4”-20 brass thumb screw from McMaster, file the threads off, and rethread it to M5×0.9. Only problem is McMaster only sells in packs of 10…oh well.

-- Dylan C ...Seems like all ever I make is sawdust...

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Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#3 posted 09-08-2016 12:08 PM

I searched for 10-28 screws and found quite a few references online. They might not have the type of head you want but there are some out there.

Also, St James Tool has a 10-28 thread replacement depth stop screw for a Stanley #78 that is only $3.00. You might check with them or look at a #78 to see if the screw might work for the spoke shave.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#4 posted 09-08-2016 01:05 PM

I’d just buy a thumbscrew from New Hampshire Plane Parts on ebay. They are good to deal with and know their stuff. If the part is listed as being from or fitting a certain model, it will.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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HokieKen

1752 posts in 602 days


#5 posted 09-08-2016 03:49 PM



I looked at something like this today. It turns out that #10-28 is VERY close to the metric M5×0.9, which is an old JIS standard that became obsolete in the mid-60 s. BUT we have a tap and die set where I work that has this size in it. I tested it out today on some 3/16” rod and it worked. My plan is to buy a 1/4”-20 brass thumb screw from McMaster, file the threads off, and rethread it to M5×0.9. Only problem is McMaster only sells in packs of 10…oh well.

- DylanC

Sounds like a good plan. Let us know how it goes.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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DylanC

196 posts in 2138 days


#6 posted 09-09-2016 03:34 AM

I saw the St. James Tool site, but the parts list hasn’t been updated for over 8 years (based on the 8-2008 on the bottom of the screen), so I passed on that. I’ve also gotten other parts from nhplaneparts on eBay, but again, I’d like to verify the TPI before dropping $13 on one screw. Thanks for both tips, though. Its good to know that St. James is still an active source for stuff like this.

One other benefit of getting 10 of them is I will be able to get a decent looking screw on my Millers Falls No. 77 Router. Right now it’s just got a 14”-20 TPI wingnut basically. The shouldered brass should look much better. And I’l have up to 9 tries to get the fabrication process right. If I nail it on the first shot, I can make 8 more and sell them online to help recoup my shipping costs!

-- Dylan C ...Seems like all ever I make is sawdust...

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DylanC

196 posts in 2138 days


#7 posted 09-15-2016 12:20 AM

So, the fabrication experiment went pretty well. Read on if interested in the whole process.

Here is an original 1/4”-20 next to the finished product. It doesn’t show too much in this photo, but the knurling got a bit dinged up during the modifications.

First step was to chuck it up in the drill press and file off the original threads. I used an old beat up metal file for this step. First pic shows about half way through the process, second is pretty much complete. Finished diameter was about 0.185”. For reference, 5 mm (the size of the threads I was going to cut) is around 0.196”.

After this step there was a bit of a “fillet” at the shoulder as seen in the pic below. I tried to file this down but didn’t work at it too much. The die wasn’t going to be able to cut threads right up to the shoulder anyway.

I didn’t get pictures of cutting the threads, but there’s nothing special there. After running the M5-0.9 die over it, I tried it in the cap. It was a bit tight, so I chucked it back up in the drill press and filed it down bit by bit until it ran freely in the cap. The diameter now sits at about 0.173”. Final step was to shorten it to length at the bench grinder and run the die over it one last time to clean up any damage from the final filing and grinding. Below is the finished product in the 151.

I would’ve liked a bit smaller head. This one looks just a tad large. I guess the increased size give a better grip and more leverage to get it nice and tight though. All-in-all not too bad. Even with the brass screw and shipping this spokeshave cost me under $20.

-- Dylan C ...Seems like all ever I make is sawdust...

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