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Deep grain cuts with white paint.

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Forum topic by Narmscr posted 09-04-2016 12:36 PM 562 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Narmscr

3 posts in 98 days


09-04-2016 12:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finish grain paint rough distress

My girl and I keep seeing items like this in stores. We really like this style and I would like to learn how to replicate it. Does anyone have any tips at how to pull this look off (specifically the type of wood to get that grain look). I was almost thinking a cedar board planed slightly could do it?

Thanks for the help.


11 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8263 posts in 2896 days


#1 posted 09-04-2016 12:41 PM

Maybe a wire brush to accentuate the grain, then paint, followed by sanding.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Narmscr's profile

Narmscr

3 posts in 98 days


#2 posted 09-06-2016 12:28 PM



Maybe a wire brush to accentuate the grain, then paint, followed by sanding.

- Gene Howe

Awesome idea, I’ll take a crack at it this weekend. I’ll use a few different brushes and woods to see how the results vary. Will post here.

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6579 posts in 1618 days


#3 posted 09-06-2016 01:44 PM

That looks just like how you would paint a sign or something that has recessed letters. Make your gouges (like with a wire brush here), paint the whole thing, use a flat sanding block and sand off the top part of the paint. You should be left with the paint that’s below the flat surface.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View Kirk650's profile

Kirk650

295 posts in 216 days


#4 posted 09-06-2016 01:47 PM

I’d use a wire brush, but it would be a round brush in an electric hand grinder. And wear safety glasses.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#5 posted 09-12-2016 07:56 PM

I’d use a pizza cutting wheel dulled a bit. If you gouge out deeply you will have to sand it smooth. If you press in the grooves you are good to go without the sanding.

http://www.dexter1818.com/4-inch-pizza-cutter-high-heat-handle.html

Liming wax for the white.

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=liming+wax

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

822 posts in 388 days


#6 posted 09-12-2016 10:34 PM

Narmscr,

While I can offer a method for producing the effect, I am at a loss as to how to preserve the effect over time.

The photo is reminiscent of the appearance of my projects after I have sanded the first coat of urethane with 220 grit sandpaper. Even after vacuuming and tacking the surface, the effect persists although diminished. The urethane dust is more or less white and gets into the pores of the wood and the scratches left behind from sanding.

When I apply a second coat of urethane, the effect disappears. As a result, I am not sure how it could be preserved. Perhaps the effect persists over time if sanded with a courser grit of sand paper and no further coats of finish are applied after sanding; I just do not know.

Whatever method(s) you elect to try, practicing on a sample board would probably be a good idea.

View nightguy's profile

nightguy

213 posts in 130 days


#7 posted 09-13-2016 01:20 AM

I would do what ever to get the grain indented, paint, let the pain set up a bit, and then wipe or scrape as much excess off. It will make the final sanding a lot easier. Leaving on all the paint and then trying to sand down to the grain would be a real PITB and a lot of clogged sand paper. Then water based poly or the blondest of Shellac, which both adds very little yellowing.

View jwmalone's profile

jwmalone

769 posts in 170 days


#8 posted 09-13-2016 02:04 AM

We used to do that a lot, once we done all the trim in two rooms that way.. Nightguy is correct, paint it then wipe off paint don’t let it dry. There are a million ways to distress it google it and you’ll find plenty of info.

-- "Boy you could get more work done it you quit flapping your pie hole" Grandpa

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

2362 posts in 2465 days


#9 posted 09-13-2016 03:00 AM

If your applying to old wood,make sure any previous urethane or finish is removed.
On a new piece I would use 25 or 50 grit sand paper and scuff the lumber.
Then dilute white paint (water based , use 1/3 water-2/3 paint) apply the paint and wipe it off before it dries.
The soft wood will take the stain-paint and the hardwood grain will wipe off .
The thinner the paint the more it will soak in.
That piece you showed looks like a hemlock spindle.
As above said, experiment on scrap pieces.
ENJOY !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Narmscr's profile

Narmscr

3 posts in 98 days


#10 posted 09-13-2016 11:58 AM

Wow, thanks everyone for the feedback. I did a test piece with a wire brush and primer (because it’s all I had in hand), but the brush I had was too fine and the primer was a bad idea.

I have ordered a brush with thicker bristles, a pizza cutter, some rough grit paper, some white acrylic and the liming wax.

I’m going to run tests this weekend and post results for how each one looks.

View Cooler's profile

Cooler

277 posts in 311 days


#11 posted 09-13-2016 12:52 PM



Wow, thanks everyone for the feedback. I did a test piece with a wire brush and primer (because it s all I had in hand), but the brush I had was too fine and the primer was a bad idea.

I have ordered a brush with thicker bristles, a pizza cutter, some rough grit paper, some white acrylic and the liming wax.

I m going to run tests this weekend and post results for how each one looks.

- Narmscr

There are several videos online for the liming wax. (And a few of the presenters are “hot babes”, so worth watching.)

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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