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Forum topic by DRJZ1974 posted 06-10-2010 05:08 AM 1925 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DRJZ1974

71 posts in 1603 days


06-10-2010 05:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: rust removal t9 rust free

I went to woodcraft today to buy some T9 surface protectant and they had the package of T9, Rust Free and Blade and bit spay for $24 (1/3 off regular price) I do not have much rust as my table saw is only 6 months old, but thought what little bit of surface rust could be easily removed with the Rust Free. I got home and applied it, I can’t get the stuff off! It has left a white film and several white blotches I can’t remove. I even tried a rubber gritted fine sanding pad used for cleaning metal with no luck. It seems like it needs some type of chemical remover, but what? Any suggestions would be great, my nice shiny table looks like crap now.


27 replies so far

View Knothead62's profile

Knothead62

2364 posts in 1650 days


#1 posted 06-10-2010 02:30 PM

Acetone or paint thinner? Try a small place first to see what happens.

View SnowyRiver's profile

SnowyRiver

51450 posts in 2169 days


#2 posted 06-10-2010 03:17 PM

Yeah, I think paint thinner would cut it, then after its removed, put on a coat of non silicon car wax to keep it from rusting.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View swirt's profile

swirt

1946 posts in 1661 days


#3 posted 06-10-2010 03:19 PM

Are you sure the haze is not actually the cleaned metal? If it removed the rust, then bare bright metal would be left behind. I know when I have used evaporust on old handsaw blades, the blade looks like it has an odd ghostly appearance, which is the newly revealed metal.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1971 posts in 2153 days


#4 posted 06-10-2010 05:54 PM

Good point SWIRT, you cleared something I wondered about way back when but just ignored till it went away.

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View DRJZ1974's profile

DRJZ1974

71 posts in 1603 days


#5 posted 06-10-2010 07:39 PM

Swirt, pretty certain it is not new revealed metal. It looks very smeary like milk was left to dry, but cant wipe it off. I have been trying to upload pics, but can’t figure out how to embed pics like other forums. I don’t want to open a photobucket or other account. I did post pics on another wood talk forum and nobody seems to be able to tell what it is. It really made the surface look bad though. The splotches and smears are not even where the light surface rust was. Really wish I would not have used this product. Made my 6 month old Sawstop look old and poorly cared for. I am really hoping the paint thinner or acetone will work.

View Milo's profile

Milo

859 posts in 2008 days


#6 posted 06-10-2010 08:22 PM

Hey DRJ,

I’ve used evaporust with great success, but it DOES change the color of the metal. I fear that is what you are suffering from. I’d contact woodcraft & and maybe sawstop and see what they recommend. I’m sorry it looks poorly. My stuff all turned a nice gunmetal grey….

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View bigjoe4265's profile

bigjoe4265

52 posts in 1621 days


#7 posted 06-10-2010 08:30 PM

I second what Milo said regarding Evapo-rust (except mine turned almost black, it was a pair of Klein lineman’s pliers), although in my own haste the few tools I applied it to it was full strength. Don’t know if that made a difference, but it did remove the rust. I dipped them in full strength after rinsing them off, which supposedly buys you protection from flash rusting. I’m wondering if a scotchbrite or 00 wool would remove the discoloring?

Also, be extremely careful using this product on aluminum. If you leave it on it will discolor that for sure.

Bigjoe

View swirt's profile

swirt

1946 posts in 1661 days


#8 posted 06-10-2010 08:56 PM

Does it have a different texture to it? Like if you run your finger across it can you feel a change from the normal metal to the smeary milk?
If you posted the photo to another forum, just copy the location of the image. Then click the insert image icon and paste in the location.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View DRJZ1974's profile

DRJZ1974

71 posts in 1603 days


#9 posted 06-11-2010 01:39 AM

Here is the link to pics I posted on another site:

http://www.woodworkingtalk.com/f2/rust-removal-problem-17501/

Like my post says, it is way worse than the pics look because I have very bright metal halide lights in my shop. This is also after at least a solid hour of rubbing with a towel and an abrasive eraser trying to remove it.

View swirt's profile

swirt

1946 posts in 1661 days


#10 posted 06-11-2010 05:00 AM

Hard to tell from the photos but it looks to me like the rust remover just removes some of the oxidation in the metal.

The part that seems odd is that rubbing with an abbrasive eraser did nothing…. it should be grinding away the surface of your table … unevenely I might add…which is why you would be better off using a very flat hardwood sanding block and some wet/dry sand paper. If this residue were a coating of some kind the abbrasive should be abrading away the residue. If it were an actual chemical change in the metal, then it would take longer to abrade that away.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View DRJZ1974's profile

DRJZ1974

71 posts in 1603 days


#11 posted 06-11-2010 05:20 AM

The eraser is very low grit, but am also very careful to use long even strokes while using it. I think I will just try paint thinner and scotchbrite then apply the T9 and chalk it up as a lesson never to us this product again on my saw. Hope it fades some over time.

View DRJZ1974's profile

DRJZ1974

71 posts in 1603 days


#12 posted 06-11-2010 05:23 AM

Maybe the scotchbrite will have more grit to remove the white streaks???

View swirt's profile

swirt

1946 posts in 1661 days


#13 posted 06-11-2010 05:37 PM

Even with long even strokes, the eraser or scotchbrite will follow the lows and highs as it conforms. If you want flat you have to use flat. Example: when restoring old hand saws, often people try to maintain the etch mark. If you use a sanding sponge or scotchbrite it will follow the dips into the etch and remove the etch and produce a finish that is bright but not mirror-like because it is not flat. If you use a flat block with sandpaper, it does not dip into the etch yet removes the metal around the etch. The resulting surface being flat is also more mirror like.

There is no real reason why your table saw top needs to be mirror like, but if the original surface was more mirror-like and you are trying to get the damaged section to go back to looking like that so it matches, then a solid flat block will get you there better than an abbrasive that conforms to the surface.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View DRJZ1974's profile

DRJZ1974

71 posts in 1603 days


#14 posted 06-11-2010 05:47 PM

Thanks Swirt, I will lay off the eraser, but try to wipe up with paint thinner. I am nervous about taking the wet/dry paper to it with the flat block. What grit would you use? I will likely not go that route yet, but will keep it as an option.

View swirt's profile

swirt

1946 posts in 1661 days


#15 posted 06-11-2010 05:55 PM

I’d start with 1000 … if that proves to be too fine (you can tell because it will leave abrasion patterns that are finer than what was left by the factory) you could always back up to 800 or 600.

I hate to burst your hopes, but I am reasonably sure that the paint thinner isn’t going to have any effect. If you have been scouring with the abrasive sponge and there has been no change, then there is nothing residue-wise to remove. I think the metal has actually been altered (even after looking at your photos). If that is the case, then there are two options.
1) Remove an entire “layer” of metal off the top of the table so that everything looks the same. ...means using the wetdry sandpaper on the block (use either water or wd40 as the “wet”)
2) Use more rust remover in hopes that the entire surface will take on the same appearance.

I hope I am wrong.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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