LumberJocks

What tools should I buy

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by Gixxerjoe04 posted 09-03-2016 07:20 PM 607 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1040 days


09-03-2016 07:20 PM

So I finally upgraded my lathe from the hf to the grizzly g0766, finally going to be able to do larger bowls and things. Have only used carbide, which was nice to get into turning since the learning curve isn’t much, but feel like they just aren’t good enough. Seems to take forever to hollow bowls out, and getting a good finish can be difficult at times depending on the wood and all of that. So with my bday coming up, was going to ask for some traditional tools from Doug Thompson. Trying to decide on what to ask for, plan on asking for the delta slow speed grinder and wolverine jig, but I know I’ll end up having to buy whatever I don’t get.

So, what should I get, plan on tuning all shapes and sizes, bowls, vases, pens, hollow forms hopefully. Talked to doug and he suggested a 5/8” V bowl gouge and 1/2” spindle gouge and I think a 1” scraper. Just wanted to see what everyone else likes using.

Was also wondering, who has the best teaching videos on youtube for learning how to use traditional tools? Gonna have to learn on smaller turnings that’s for sure.


17 replies so far

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7147 posts in 2378 days


#1 posted 09-03-2016 08:11 PM

ALL OF THEM!...........................

What else is new?... ;-)

.
.
.
.
.
.
P.S. Welcome to the club…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1883 posts in 1598 days


#2 posted 09-03-2016 09:06 PM

Got by with just a 1/2” Henry Taylor bowl gouge before adding a 5/8” Crown gouge. I like both U & V style bowl gouges. Bought a Thompson 5/8” U bowl gouge to replace that Crown gouge. I use a 5/8” gouge for roughing out and 1/2” for final turning. Think have three 1/2” bowl gouges with different bevel angles on them now.

I would go with both Thompson 1/2” bowl & spindle gouge to start off with. Not a big fan of scrapers but have more than a few of them. Prefer thick or heavy duty scrapers. My HT scrapers are over twenty years old and work fine. I don’t use scrapers on spindle turning.

Like Thompson tools and plan on adding 3/8” & 1/2” spindle gouges to replace ones have now. Not sure but looks like his gouge flutes are longer than others. I buy unhandled be cause make my own with larger handles.

-- Bill

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7173 posts in 2041 days


#3 posted 09-03-2016 10:39 PM

View sawdust703's profile

sawdust703

270 posts in 884 days


#4 posted 09-04-2016 12:20 AM

Not to be a smart ass, but experience is your best teacher. I’ve been woodworking over 20 years, & took up the lathe in the last couple years. I bought the HF set of chisels w/the red handles to learn with. No, they ain’t top end, but they are ok to learn with. I’ve got an 80 grit wheel on one side of my 6” grinder, & a 220 white wheel on the other side. Some say this ain’t the way to sharpen, but it works for me. I found an ebook called Lathes & Turning Tools. Its a book of select readings from American Wood Turner. Its a short, but informative book about all different subjects of wood turning. I’ve learned a lot from this book.

I’m a scroll sawyer by choice. 23 years at it. It took lots of research, reading, & hands on to get it perfected. My idea with the lathe is to incorporate it into some of my scroll work. I do all kinds of scroll work from sign making, to beer steins. I make dream catchers, crosses, memorials, etc. I cut my own feathers for the dream catchers. Scrolling has been an interesting journey.

The lathe can be fickle, & regardless of the chisel, can help you destroy a project before you even know it happened. In my experience. Sharpening is a good place to start. After that, decide what type of turning you are really wanting to do. Then purchase chisels for that type of turning. Some have told me that, bein’ a beginner, & me wanting to make platters, dinner plates, things like that, to start out with a 1/2” bowl gouge, & add to it. I also want to make other things, too. I’ll try different gouges, & tools until I find what works for me.

-- Sawdust703

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2408 days


#5 posted 09-04-2016 04:26 AM

That was the same answer I was going to offer.

:)

ALL OF THEM!...........................

What else is new?... ;-)

.
.
.
.
.
.
P.S. Welcome to the club…

- HorizontalMike


View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 332 days


#6 posted 09-04-2016 04:31 AM

If you want a decent set of tools for all types of turning, you might want to get a set like this one: https://www.amazon.com/Hurricane-Turning-Tools-Woodturning-Complete/dp/B008DH9BL6/ref=sr_1_12 You might not need all of them, and you might need a few smaller ones for smaller work, but at least you’ll be well covered for whatever projects you might want to do. Just make sure you understand what each tool is for, how to use it and how to sharpen it. There are YouTube videos on all of them. Some of them take a lot more time to learn than others. You can probably master a scraper in about five minutes, but a skew chisel can keep you humble for months. Make sure you learn each tool before you try to use it, and whatever you do, do not use a spindle roughing gouge in a bowl! There are some videos that show how disasterous this kind of experimentation can be.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

View jeff's profile

jeff

988 posts in 2929 days


#7 posted 09-04-2016 06:56 AM

When I wanted to purchase a higher quality tool,I called Doug Thompson and he recommended 3 tools.A 1/2” V and U shaped bowl gouge and a 3/8” spindle gouge.I made my own handles.They are very nice tools.There are many YouTube videos on wood turning/sharpening.Here are a few.
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheCymruBoy
https://www.youtube.com/user/WYOMINGWOODTURNER
https://www.youtube.com/user/robohippy
For sharpening many turners use the Wolverine jig-easy to setup and use.I use Raptor Setup Tools from Craft Supplies Usa-they’re easy to use and you get a consistent bevel on your tools all the time.Lots of good reviews on that G0766 lathe-it looks like a winner.

-- Jeff,Tucson,Az.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

1883 posts in 1598 days


#8 posted 09-04-2016 12:11 PM

Hurricane turnig tools on par with Harbor Freight & Penn State tools. If bought individually as you need them makes sense. The spindle set from HF for less than $80 great for those starting out not sure they sell bowl gouges.

http://www.thewoodturningstore.com/woodturning-tools-1/

From what have read on various message boards is chucks are a better value.

http://www.thewoodturningstore.com/accessories/woodturning-chucks/

-- Bill

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

835 posts in 1040 days


#9 posted 09-04-2016 01:10 PM

Have heard the htc125 is a good chuck for turning large bowls, my supernova 2 should work fine for now. Thought about getting smaller gouges for now and getting larger ones, once I figure out how to properly use them, not gonna chuck up a big bowl blank to learn on anyways, figure the larger ones would be difficult to learn on smaller stuff. I was curious, with carbide being scrapers, do the hss scrapers work a lot better than carbide?

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1749 days


#10 posted 09-04-2016 01:48 PM

I have the HTC 125 chuck. It is a big strong chuck. I also bought the HF turning set. I still use some of them today like the parting tool. Once you get through the turning/sharpening curve I would suggest Thompson tools. Regarding carbide I made a set with inserts from Captain Eddie. However I prefer the Thompson scrapers 10 to 1 over the carbide. I won’t make any more carbide except for hollowing.

-- Bill R

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 765 days


#11 posted 09-04-2016 03:20 PM

An important thing to remember with bowl gouges (not spindle gouges) is there is a size difference in UK made or gauged. In general they are 1/8 larger than others because they are measured by the flute not the diameter.
So a 1/2 UK is the same as a 5/8 US, or a 3/8 UK is the same as a 1/2 US. Some of the UK are Sorby, Hamlet, Asley Iles, Crown…. Hurricane is also UK specifications.
What you go with depends on what you want to turn. For bowls I would go with a 1/2 spindle gouge and 5/8 (US) bowl gouge.
I’m not a big fan of scrapers on bowls but lots of folks love them.
If you are going to do smaller spindle work (like pens, candle sticks, etc) I would suggest a skew.

There are many good videos on youtube but I think you need to be a little more specific. Not may have videos covering broad topics. Some mainly do just bows, others just spindles…..
Suggestions for bowl turning will probably produce different responses than correcting problems with the skew.
Some would be Lyle Jamieson, Stuart Batty, Richard Raffan, Brenden Stemp, John Lucas, Brian Havens, and many others.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Bill7255's profile

Bill7255

354 posts in 1749 days


#12 posted 09-05-2016 01:56 PM

The other thing I would suggest is tool rest from Robust. I just recently got mine and really like them. Makes life a lot easier. I have the inside bowl, outside bowl, J rest, and the 6” and 12” straight rest.

-- Bill R

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

92 posts in 332 days


#13 posted 09-06-2016 11:17 AM


I was curious, with carbide being scrapers, do the hss scrapers work a lot better than carbide?

- Gixxerjoe04


They do if you keep them sharp. When I use a square-nose scraper with a fresh edge the wood comes off in big, wide thin flakes. That’s a good indication that it’s doing more cutting than tearing.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1057 posts in 1453 days


#14 posted 09-06-2016 11:45 AM

Recommend starting out with cheaper HSS tools, such as Benjamin’s Best or Hurricane. You won’t be near as reluctant to try shaping a new tip profile and other things with a $20 tool vs a $75-$100 tool. It’s also cheap to try different size gouges, scrapers, etc. with different shapes and bevel angles and learn what works and what you like. When you wear out the cheaper tools then possibly replace with high $ stuff.

The best videos I’ve found: Bowls – Lyle Jamieson, Skew chisel - Allan Batty, Spindle gouges – Alan Lacer/AmericanWoodworker

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 851 days


#15 posted 09-06-2016 03:50 PM

I second OSU55’s recomendation. I have both BB and Hurricane tools and both are a solid yet relatively inexpensive choice for a beginner. You’ll need to learn to sharpen the various profiles and you don’t want to waste a lot of steel from an expensive tool as you learn. You may also want to invest in some sharpening tools. Most people recommend a slow speed grinder. I personally like using a belt sander but either way you will want to buy or make tool rests and jigs to make sharpening the various profiles easier, faster and repeatable.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com